slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
What type of people do you think were accused of using witchcraft and why?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 44

What type of people do you think were accused of using witchcraft and why? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 334 Views
  • Uploaded on

Recap. What type of people do you think were accused of using witchcraft and why?. Image Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts Illustration "Arresting a Witch". Recap. What crimes/actions were witches accused of ?.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'What type of people do you think were accused of using witchcraft and why?' - libitha


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1
Recap

What type of people do you think were accused of using witchcraft and why?

Image Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MassachusettsIllustration "Arresting a Witch"

slide2
Recap

What crimes/actions were witches accused of ?

Image Courtesy of Glasgow University Library, Special Collections

slide3
Witches and Witchcraft

Trials and Punishment

slide4
…Aims of the lesson:

To explore witch trials and their outcomes

To discover what punishments supposed witches received for practising witchcraft

slide6
Discuss what you think is happening in the picture.

Who are these people?

“The Trial of George Jacobs, August 5, 1692”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1855.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide7
What do you think this lady is doing?

Young girl accusing George Jacobs of being a Warlock

George Jacobs – accused of witchcraft

People affected by witchcraft faint

slide8
The people of Salem suffered a great deal prior to 1692. Taxes were high and a number of people were killed by Indians, who were thought to be agents of the Devil.

In fact the people of Salem who had arrived as colonists from Europe before 1692 suffered so many hardships that it is no wonder that many thought that the Devil was amongst them causing things to go wrong.

Hanged in Salem, New England, 1692

Events in Salem, Massachusetts, New England

As you know belief in witchcraft was not new in the 1600’s. In England the church had given licenses to ministers to cast out devils and Matthew Hopkins had been employed to round up witches for execution.

slide9
George Jacobs was an old man who had to have the aid of two sticks while walking. When accused of witchcraft and taken before the magistrates, one of whom began the trial with the words, “Here are those that accuse you of acts of witchcraft”, George Jacobs replied bravely, “Well, let us hear who are they and what are they.” When his servant stood forward and accused him ofpractising witchcraft George Jacobs replied with: “You tax me for a wizard: you may as well tax me for a buzzard. I have done no harm.” The magistrates asked him to recite the Lord’s Prayer and he apparently “missed out several parts of it”.George Jacobs was condemnedto death and hung in 1692.
slide11
These paintings and illustrations have been reproduced with the kind permission of

Peabody Essex Museum, Massachusetts.

Click upon the picture that you would like to study

Next set of pictures

slide12
“Examination of a witch”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1854.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide13
“Examination of a witch”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1854.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

What do you think is happening here?

slide14
“Examination of a witch”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1854.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

Who do you think this person is supposed to be?

slide15
“Examination of a witch”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1854.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

What do you think is happening here?

slide16
“Examination of a witch”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1854.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

What do you think is happening here?

slide17
“Examination of a witch”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1854.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

Who do you think this person is?What is he doing?

slide18
“Examination of a witch”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1854.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

Who do you think this person is?What may his job be?

slide19
“Examination of a witch”. By T.H. Matteson, Oil on canvas, 1854.

(Photo by Mark Sexton). Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

What may this man be trying to do?

slide20
Write a paragraph describing the scene shown in the picture.

Remember to add and explain as much information as possible.

Click here for help

slide21
Write a paragraph describing the scene shown in the picture.

Remember to add and explain as much information as possible.

Click here for help

* Briefly explain what the whole scene is about - then,* Describe what is happening in each part of the painting in more detail.i) Who are the people shown?ii) Why are these people here – what are their jobs?iii) What may the outcome of this event be?

slide22
Witch Tests and Trials

Witch examinations often involved looking for a witch-mark. This was supposed to be where familiars sucked blood fromthe witch.

Sometimes large pins were pushed into the witch-mark. If the person did not cry out in pain (or if she did not bleed from the wound!) she was a witch.

Other witches were ducked or thrown into water with their hands tied. If they sank (and drowned!) they were saidto be innocent and if they floated they were guilty and hung or burnt.

slide23
Illustration, "Witchcraft in New England,"

a 19th century engraving, depicting 17th century New England

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide24
?

Who do you think these people are?

Illustration, "Witchcraft in New England,"

a 19th century engraving, depicting 17th century New England

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide25
What could be happening here?

?

Illustration, "Witchcraft in New England,"

a 19th century engraving, depicting 17th century New England

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide26
?

Who could this be? What could she be saying?

Illustration, "Witchcraft in New England,"

a 19th century engraving, depicting 17th century New England

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide27
What could the following people be saying?

?

Illustration, "Witchcraft in New England,"

a 19th century engraving, depicting 17th century New England

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide28
What could the following people be saying?

?

Illustration, "Witchcraft in New England,"

a 19th century engraving, depicting 17th century New England

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide29
What could the following people be saying?

?

Illustration, "Witchcraft in New England,"

a 19th century engraving, depicting 17th century New England

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide30
Write a paragraph describing the scene shown in the picture.

Remember to add and explain as much information as possible.

Click here for help

slide31
Write a paragraph describing the scene shown in the picture.

Remember to add and explain as much information as possible.

Click here for help

* Briefly explain what the whole scene is about - then,* Describe what is happening in each part of the picture in more detail.i) Who are the people shown?ii) Why are these people here – what are their jobs?iii) What may the outcome of this event be?

slide32
?

Click upon the picture that you would like to study

These paintings and illustrations have been reproduced with the kind permission of

Peabody Essex Museum, Massachusetts.

Recap

slide33
Here is an example of some of the punishments that were used during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.

"Old Boston Town House Square, about 1657“ Stocks Old Boston Townhouse, ca, 1657Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts

slide34
Types of punishment

Can you think of any other forms of punishment that may have been used?

slide35
Write a paragraph describing the types of punishment that people accused of witchcraft could receive.

Remember to add and explain as much information as possible.

Click here for help

slide36
Write a paragraph describing the types of punishment that people accused of witchcraft could receive.

Remember to add and explain as much information as possible.

Click here for help

* Briefly explain each punishment - What type of punishment was it? - What would the outcome of the punishment be?

slide37
What do you think is happening in this picture?

Click the forward arrow for more help

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide38
What do you think is happening in this picture?

Click the forward arrow for more help

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide39
Click the forward arrow for more help

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide40
Highlight areas of the picture that you would like to discuss

Courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

slide41
Why did people treat those suspected of witchcraft in this way?

Who can you see and what are they doing?

Image courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

Worksheet

slide43
Recap

Witch Trials and Punishments

Extension

End

Image courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts

slide44
Extension Work and Revision:For more information upon Witchcraft you could visit The University of Glasgowwebsite - Special Collections Department.

http://special.lib.gla.ac.uk/

You may also like to visit Peabody Essex Museum:

http://www.pem.org

for additional information upon witchcraft and The Salem Witch Trials.

Although institutions and organisations have kindly agreed that we can provide links and use some of the images found on their sites, they are not responsible for the way in which those images have been used. Nor are they responsible for any of the written content found within this presentation.

ad