roman geography
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Roman Geography

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 14

Roman Geography - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 266 Views
  • Uploaded on

Roman Geography. Students will be able to identify the boundaries of the Roman Empire at its height. Rome. Troy. Carthage. Beginning of Rome. Myth Trojan prince Aeneas discovers Latins while looking for promise land. Romulus and Remus, son of Latin princess and god Mars, abandoned

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Roman Geography' - libitha


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
roman geography

Roman Geography

Students will be able to identify the boundaries of the Roman Empire at its height.

slide2
Rome

Troy

Carthage

beginning of rome
Beginning of Rome

Myth

  • Trojan prince Aeneas discovers Latins while looking for promise land.
  • Romulus and Remus, son of Latin princess and god Mars, abandoned
  • Romulus and Remus cared for by she-wolf, discovered by shepherd and wife
  • Romulus kills Remus; becomes king of Rome
beginning of rome1
Beginning of Rome

Historical

  • Latins settled on Palatine, a futile area with pleasant climate, around 1200 B.C.
  • Etruscans (people of the sea) of Etruia ruled Rome (Latins) for 200 years
  • Romans overthrew Etruscan leaders and set up a Republic in 509 B. C.
slide5
Roman Empire

500 B.C. – 264 B.C.

Rome

Troy

Carthage

expansion of the roman republic
Expansion of the Roman Republic

The Battle of Zama

  • Romans conquered and controlled all of Italy by 275 B.C.
  • City-State Carthage ruled much of North Africa, Spain, and Sicily
  • Roman conflict with Carthage started the Punic Wars
  • Romans fought Carthaginians for control of Mediterranean Sea
  • Hannibal defeated at Zama; Carthage lost all its territories to Rome
  • By 146 B.C. Rome was the leading power of the Mediterranean.
slide7
Roman Empire

265 B.C. – 146 B.C.

Rome

Troy

Carthage

Hannibal’s route to

Rome.

the final years of the roman republic
The Final Years of the Roman Republic

Julius Caesar

  • Rome’s conquers caused changes in economy and government
    • Large estates replaced small farms; cities became crowed
    • Gap grew between rich and poor
  • Attempts were made to improve conditions in Rome
    • Gracchi brothers gave land and wheat to the poor
    • General Mariusa gave power to the army
    • General Sulla gave more power to the Senate
  • Julius Caesar built up army and took power
    • Conquered Britain, Libya, Egypt, Cyrenaica, Numidia, Syria, Asia Minor
    • Caesar assassinated by those who opposed his dictatorship
slide9
Roman Empire

147 B.C. – 44 B.C.

Rome

Troy

Carthage

the roman empire
The Roman Empire

Cleopatra’s Death

  • After Caesar’s death, power shared by Marc Antony, Lepidus, and Octavian.
  • Civil War broke out between Antony and Cleopatra and Octavian
  • Octavian won naval victory at Actium in 31 B.C.
  • When Antony was defeated and Egypt was made a Roman province, he and Cleopathra committed suicide to avoid being paraded through Rome as captives
  • Octavian became absolute Ruler of Rome; he was given the title Augustus (honored)
  • As Rome’s “First Citizen” Augustus ended the expansion of the Empire at its defensible boundaries: Rhine, Danube and Euphrates rivers; and Sahara Desert
  • Augustus introduced the “Pax Romana,” a time of peace and unity for the Empire
slide11
Roman Empire

44 B.C. – 31 B.C.

Rome

Troy

Carthage

the roman empire1
The Roman Empire

Gladiatorial Games

  • Augustus’ successors accepted his defensive foreign policies
  • Trajan, Rome’s last great conqueror, established new provinces in Dacia, Armenia, Assyria, and Mesopotamia
  • Empire reached its greatest height under Trajan in A.D. 117
  • Five Good Emperors ruled Rome between A.D. 96 and A.D. 186
  • After A.D. 186, civil war broke out in the Empire and emperors lost control
  • Rome’s size was difficult to manage; Diocletian divided it in two
  • Barbarians attacked the Empire from many sides
  • Internally, gladiatorial games were one sign of Rome’s decline
slide13
Roman Empire

43 B.C. – 117 A.D.

Rome

Troy

Carthage

slide14
Roman Empire Split

349 A.D.

Constantinople

Rome

Troy

Western Roman Empire

Eastern Roman Empire

Byzantine Empire

Carthage

ad