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The purpose of education is to enhance understanding. Howard Gardner. Literacy and Language Learning. Cet atelier vous offre: de l’information basée sur la recherche des idées des stratégies et

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Presentation Transcript
slide1
The purpose of

education is

to enhance

understanding.

Howard Gardner

1.4

literacy and language learning
Literacy and Language Learning

Cet atelier vous offre:

  • de l’information basée sur la recherche
  • des idées
  • des stratégies et
  • des ressources…pour vous aider B enseigner la lecture dans la salle de classe de français langue seconde

1.4

literacy for learning
Literacy for Learning
  • is based on current research and best practice cited in Literacy for Learning The Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy in Grades 4 to 6 in Ontario
  • reflects the information in the junior Guide to Effective Literacy Instruction
  • reflectsthe information in Education for All The Report - The Expert Panel on Literacy and Numeracy Instruction for Students With Special Education Needs, Kindergarten to Grade 6

1.4

complexities of being literate
Complexities of Being Literate

“Literacy is defined …as the ability to use language and images in rich and varied forms to read, write, listen, speak, view, represent, and think critically about ideas. It enables us to share information, to interact with others, and to make meaning. Literacy is a complex process.”

(Literacy For Learning,The Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy

in Grades 4 to 6 in Ontario, 2004 )

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what it means to be literate
What It Means to Be Literate

“Literacy is about more than reading and writing – it is about how we communicate in society. It is about social practices and relationships, about knowledge, language and culture. Literacy…finds its place in our lives alongside other ways of communicating. Indeed literacy itself takes many forms: on paper, on the computer screen, on TV, on posters and signs. Those who use literacy take it for granted – but those who cannot use it are excluded from much communication in today’s world. Indeed, it is the excluded who can best appreciate the notion of literacy as freedom.” (UNESCO)

1.4

slide7
If I have one tenet in teaching, it is that no one can make a student learn anything.

You can only provide an environment for possibilities and hope.

Susan Ohanian, Who’s in Charge? 1994

1.4

the building blocks of language
The Building Blocks of Language

4.1

WORDS

Speaking

Reading

Writing

Representing

Listening

Viewing

1.4

word knowledge
Word Knowledge

Word knowledge encompasses spelling, grammar, language conventions, literary devices, and word choice.

Literacy for Learning: The Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy in Grades 4 to 6 in Ontario, 2004, p.88

1.4

instruction
Instruction

Instruction [in word knowledge] must be developmentally appropriate, interactive, and constructive, providing students with genuine opportunities to make meaning with words and to use them in real-world contexts.

Literacy for Learning: The Report of the Expert Panel

on Literacy in Grades 4 to 6 in Ontario, 2004, p.88

1.4

considerations for reading instruction in the language classroom
Considerations for Reading Instruction in the Language Classroom
  • Availability of and exposure to books of a variety of types/forms
  • What Teacher Read Aloud and Shared Reading can look like in a Core French classroom
  • Opportunities for reading and writing in French
  • Opportunities to choose personally significant topics, forms or texts
  • Reading and writing are purposeful – authentic, cross-curricular
  • Reading and writing are reciprocal

1.4

reading key messages
Reading – Key Messages
  • Reading … (in the language classroom) is an interactive, problem-solving process, with the primary purpose of making meaning.
  • All … students need to use higher-order thinking and critical-literacy skills to read and understand increasingly complex texts.
  • …students need high-quality texts of appropriate complexity and variety, and many opportunities to read and talk about their reading.
  • Both successful and struggling readers need rich reading experiences. Struggling readers should not be limited to low-level activities focused on decoding and literal comprehension.

1.4

reading key messages13
Reading – Key Messages
  • Reading begins with what the reader already knows. The reader’s personal and cultural identity, first language, and other knowledge, experiences, and interests all contribute to the process of making meaning.
  • Reading instruction is based on information about students’ learning needs gathered by the teacher from a variety of assessments.
  • (Language) students need purposeful and explicit reading instruction to read successfully and to understand a range of text forms in a variety of subjects.
  • Engagement with a wide variety of text forms can help students see the texts all around them and recognize the many ways in which they read every day.

1.4

to begin
To Begin…
  • Provide sufficient, varied and appropriate selection of books–genres, formats, fiction,nonfiction, levels …
  • Know your students as readers.
  • Build background knowledge through Read Aloud and Shared Reading.

1.4

what do my students need
What Do My Students Need?

Students need experience with:

  • questioning
  • accountable talk
  • reading response
  • retell, relate, reflect
  • making connections and other reading comprehension strategies

1.4

slide16

Planning with the End in Mind

To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where you are going so that you better understand where you are now so that the steps you take are always in the right direction.

Stephen R. Covey

1.4

planning for inclusion
Planning for Inclusion

“In a diverse classroom, no single method can reach all learners. Multiple pathways to achieving goals are needed.” (Hitchcock et al., 2002,p.18)

Education for All – The Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy and Numeracy Instruction

for Students With Special Education Needs, Kindergarten to Grade 6, 2005.

1.4

gradual release of responsibility
Gradual Release of Responsibility

Teacher models

  • explains, demonstrates, thinks aloud

Shared Practice

  • teacher and student practise strategy together

Guided Practice

  • students practise the strategy with coaching from the teacher

Independent Practice

  • students apply strategy on their own
  • get feedback

Student Application

  • new genre or format/more difficult text

1.4

the comprehension strategies
Activating Prior Knowledge

Making Connections

Questioning

Making Predictions

Inferring

Visualizing

Determining Important Information

Synthesizing

Monitoring And Repairing Comprehension

The Comprehension Strategies

1.4

making connections
Making Connections

The reader cannot create. That has been done for him by the author. The reader can only interpret, giving the author a chance to make his impression. Robertson Davies

“When you use your schema, it wakes up memories.” (Nina)

1.4

questioning
Questioning

We must strive to create classrooms that celebrate curiosity.

In fact, schools often appear more interested in answers than in questions.

Harvey and Goodvis, Strategies That Work

Asking questions is smart. It means you don’t understand something and you know you don’t understand it.” (Bret)

1.4

visualizing
Visualizing

When we visualize, we are in fact, inferring, but with mental images rather than words and thoughts.

When we visualize, we create pictures in our mind that belong to us and no one else.

Children can share their mental images by talking, drawing/illustrating, acting them out.

Goudvis and Harvey, Strategies That Work

“When my mom reads me Harry Potter, it’s like I have a paint set inside my brain. And I never run out of paint.” (Ben)

1.4

on reading aloud
On reading aloud . . .

When words

are infused

with the human voice,

they come alive.

MAYA ANGELOU

1.4

why read aloud
Why Read-aloud?
  • to entertain
  • to inform
  • to explain
  • to reassure
  • to arouse curiosity
  • to inspire
  • to model

Jim Trelease, The Read Aloud Handbook

1.4

what does the expert panel say about read aloud
What does the Expert Panel say about Read-aloud:
  • relatively uninterrupted
  • students to experience the whole before examining the parts
  • students experience global aspects of text: story grammar, characterization,

cause and effect, character motivation, etc.

1.4

shared reading
Shared Reading

“We can make the most of our reading time with students by making it a richer instructional context: demonstrating a new literary form, connecting it to the curriculum, and inviting active participation.”

Routman p.147

1.4

shared reading30
Shared Reading

Shared Reading involves:

  • direct instruction of reading skills, strategies and behaviours
  • creating an environment that supports risk taking
  • revisiting text to build fluency, deepen understanding and provide opportunity for critical thinking
  • building a class repertoire of texts
  • offering an entry point for all students
  • allowing students to build on the ideas of others

1.4

reflecting in the shared reading lesson
Reflecting in the Shared Reading Lesson
  • Clarifies and affirms the reader’s thinking
  • Deepens reader’s understanding
  • Provides future direction for the teacher - short and long term
  • Targets largest group of “like” readers
  • Text is at instructional level
  • Explicit instruction occurs in shared reading
  • Balances needs of students with expectations to be taught.

1.4

sharing and reflecting
Sharing and Reflecting
  • Reading time is always followed by the opportunity to share what they have learned as readers.
  • This encourages students to be aware of their own learning (metacognition).
  • Sharing is often oral.

1.4

readers theatre and boys
Readers Theatre and Boys

“Boys often enjoy working with readers theatre scripts, which allow them to feel like active participants in a story.”

p.22

1.4

give one get one
Give One! Get One!

Consultation Line – Favourite Mises-en-train

1.4

carousels
Carousels
  • Model Lessons for Read Aloud and Shared Reading
  • Grades 4,6 & 8

1.4

carousels37
Carousels
  • Model Lessons for Read Aloud and Shared Reading
  • Grades 4,6 & 8

1.4

conclusion
Conclusion
  • Reading in the Core French classroom is…
  • One strategy I plan to use soon is…
  • One strategy I plan to use next year is…

1.4

c l brons la lecture et la litt ratie
Célébrons la lecture et la littératie

…en français, et partout!

Merci de votre participation aujourd’hui.

1.4