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High School Content Expectations: Science

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  1. High School Content Expectations: Science

  2. Overview of Process • Academic Work Group – January, 2006 • Dr. Andy Anderson (MSU), Co-Chair • Dr. Robert Poel (WMU), Co-Chair • Sub-committees for Earth Space, Biology, Physics, Chemistry • First Draft to State Board – May, 2006 • Public/Web Review – May 15 – July 1, 2006 • National Review – June, 2006 • Final Approval by State Board – August, 2006

  3. Content Expectations Goal These expectations were developed to provide a description of what students should know and be able to do in Scienceby the end of high school for postsecondary success – college, careers and community.

  4. Content Expectations Goal The Expectations provide a foundation for curriculum and assessment development that represents rigorous and relevant learning for ALL high school students.

  5. Content Expectations Goal The Expectations: • Revise and extend the current Michigan Curriculum Framework High School Standards and Benchmarks. • They will also becomethe basis forthe non-ACT elements within theMichigan Merit Exam.

  6. Rigor, Relevance, and Applied Learning Standards These Expectationswill engage students to… • Master content knowledge • Have the ability to apply that knowledge to analyze and propose solutions to real-world problems • Make connections between what they read, hear, and learn in class and the world around them

  7. Rigor, Relevance, and Applied Learning Standards These Expectations will: • Challenge students intellectually • Require that students make a substantial investment in their own learning • Foster the development of cognitive abilities • Promote inquiry

  8. Science Development Work Group Academic Review Andy Anderson, Co-Chair, MSU Robert Poel, Co-Chair, WMU • Theron Blakeslee, Ingham ISD • Carol Clark, DLEG • Brian Coppola, U of M • Mark Davids, Grosse Pointe South HS • Claudia Douglass, CMU • Kaz Fujita, MSU • George Goff, Detroit King HS • Annis Hapkiewicz, Okemos HS • Marilyn Rands, LTU • Walter Rathkamp, SVSU • Kevin Richard, MDE • Judy Ruddock, Flint PS • Sandra Rutherford, EMU • Michael Seymour, Hope College • Randy Showerman, DLEG • Betty Underwood, MDE Internal Review • Larry Calser, Genesse Math/Science • Paul Drummond, Macomb ISD • Mandi Frantii, Munising HS • Michael Gallagher, Oakland Schools • Shamarion Green, Flint Schools • Joseph Grigas, Lake Fenton HS • Cheryl Hach, Kalamazoo Math/Science • Ardis Herrold, Grosse Pointe South HS • Michael Klein, Macomb ISD • David Peters, East Kentwood HS • Kevin Richard, MDE • Gary Waterson, Benzie Central HS Project Coordinator • Susan Codere Kelly, MDE

  9. Organizing Structure

  10. Levels of Content • Pre-requisites • Knowledge needed when entering high school (K – 7) • Essential • Critical knowledge regardless of course • Aligned to large-scale assessment • Core • Specific to the discipline (course) • Required for credit in required areas (Biology, and Chemistry or Physics) • Preparation for advanced study

  11. Choice All All Choice All All All All All All All All Credit for high school Earth and Space Science, Biology, Physics, and Chemistry will be defined as meeting BOTH essential and core subject area content expectations. Represents required for graduation Science Content Structure

  12. Science Application Construct

  13. Levels of Construct • Identifying • Recall, define, relate, represent basic principles • Using • Make sense of the natural world, predict and explain observations • Inquiry • Identify and explain patterns, habits of mind • Reflecting • Critique and justify strengths and weaknesses of scientific knowledge

  14. Next Steps • Public/Web Review – May – July 1, 2006 • National Review – June, 2006 • State Board Approval – August, 2006 • Statewide Launch – September, 2006 • Model Lesson Development – October, 2006 to June, 2007

  15. Viewing For the complete Science High School Content Expectations document, please click on the image below. For the Science Content Expectations by standard, please continue to the next slide.

  16. Viewing We invite you to view these Expectations. Click on the Back button in your browser window to return back to Science HSCE PowerPoint. • Earth & Space Science • Biology • Physics • Chemistry

  17. Viewing Earth and Space Science: To view a copy of the Expectations, click here: To view a paper copy of the Survey, click on this link: Paper Copy

  18. Viewing Biology: To view a copy of the Expectations, click here: To view a paper copy of the Survey, click on this link: Paper Copy

  19. Viewing and Commenting Physics: To view a copy of the Expectations, click here: To view a paper copy of the Survey, click on this link: Paper Copy

  20. Viewing and Commenting Chemistry: To view a copy of the Expectations, click here: To view a paper copy of the Survey, click on this link: Paper Copy

  21. Contact Information For additional information, contact: Susan Codere Kelly, Project Coordinator Office of School Improvement CodereS@michigan.gov Kevin Richard,Science Consultant Office of School Improvement RichardKe@michigan.gov