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HIGH SCHOOLS IN AMERICA 2003

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  1. Archived Information HIGH SCHOOLS IN AMERICA 2003 Prepared for the US Department of Education By The Education Trust

  2. What Do We Know About Student Achievement?

  3. 12th Grade Achievement In Math and Science is Up Somewhat

  4. High School Achievement: Math and Science Source: NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress.

  5. In Reading, 12th Grade Achievement is Headed Downward

  6. HIGH SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT: READING AND WRITING

  7. After Earlier Progress in Narrowing Gaps, Gaps in the 90’s Grew

  8. Gaps Narrow Then Mostly Widen NAEP Reading, 17 Year-Olds 21 31 Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 107) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

  9. Gaps Narrow, Then Hold Steady or Widen: NAEP Math Scores, 17 Year-Olds 32 20 Source: US Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress (p. 108) Washington, DC: US Department of Education, August 2000

  10. Students Make More Growth Grade 4 to 8 than Grade 8 to 12

  11. Academic GrowthGrades 4-8, 8-12

  12. Value Added in High School Declined During the Nineties

  13. Value Added Declining in High School Math... Age 13-17 Growth Source: NAEP 1999 Trends in Academic Progress

  14. …Still Age 13-17 Growth Source: Main NAEP 1996, 2000

  15. Reading: Students Entering Better Prepared, But Leaving Worse Source: NAEP 1996 Trends in Academic Progress

  16. Hormones?

  17. Students in Other Countries Gain far More in High School

  18. TIMSS

  19. Source: NCES 1999-081R, Highlights From TIMSS

  20. Source: NCES 1999-081R, Highlights From TIMSS

  21. PISA

  22. US 15 Year-Olds Rank Near Middle Of The Pack Among 32 Participating Countries

  23. One measure on which we rank high?Inequality!

  24. Performance Of U.S.15 Year-Olds Highly Variable *Of 27 OECD countries Source: OECD, Knowledge and Skills for Life: First Results From PISA 2000, 2001.

  25. KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS AT END OF HIGH SCHOOL

  26. NAEP Mathematics Performance 2000

  27. By Race, Ethnicity NAEP 12th Grade Math 2000 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

  28. By Income 12th Grade Math (2000) Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

  29. By Race, Ethnicity NAEP 12th Grade Reading 2002 Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

  30. By Income 12th Grade Reading (2002) Source: USDOE, NCES, National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Summary Data Tables

  31. African American and Latino 17 Year Olds Do Math at Same Levels As White 13 Year Olds Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)

  32. African American and Latino 17 Year Olds Read at Same Levels as White 13 Year Olds Source: Source: NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends Summary Tables (online)

  33. These, of course, are just the students who MAKE IT through high school.

  34. Each Year, One of Every Twenty High School Students Leaves School

  35. One Year Dropout Rates by Race, Grades 10-12 Source: NCES “Drop-out Rates in U.S. 1998” (1999)

  36. One Year Drop-out Rates by Family Income, Grades 10-12 Source: NCES “Drop-out Rates in U.S. 1998” (1999)

  37. By Age 18-19, 82% of American Young People Have Earned a Diploma (72.5%) or a GED/Equivalency Certificate (9.8%)

  38. By Age 22-24, 86.3% of American Young People Have Earned a Diploma (75.9%) or a GED/Equivalency Certificate (10.4%)

  39. Students Complete High School At Different Rates, 2000 Age 18-24 Source: US Bureau of Census, Current Population Reports, Educational Attainment in the United States: March 2000, Detailed Tables No. 2

  40. Inevitable?

  41. No. Around the Country, there are: • Classrooms; • Schools; • Districts; and, • Even entire states where students—especially poor and minority students—are performing at much higher levels.

  42. SO, WHAT CAN WE DO? Four questions to help frame our improvement efforts.

  43. #1. Can we agree on a single, overarching goal for high school that will give clearer purpose, focus to our reform efforts?

  44. Kids and Parents are Clear: Their Goal is College Source:Metropolitan Life, Survey of the American Teacher 2000: Are We Preparing Students for the 21st Century?, September 2000.

  45. Indeed, Most High School Grads Do Go On To Postsecondary Within 2 Years Source: NELS: 88, Second (1992) and Third (1994) Follow up; in, USDOE, NCES, “Access to Postsecondary Education for the 1992 High School Graduates”, 1998, Table 2.

  46. That’s Good, Because Education Pays:Annual Earnings of 25-34 yr-olds by Attainment, 2001 Source: US bureau of Labor Statistics and Bureau of the Census, Current Population Survey, March 2002

  47. But Many of Those College Freshmen Not Prepared…and Do Not Return for Sophomore Year Source: Tom Mortensen, Postsecondary Opportunity, No. 89, November 1999

  48. Why? At Least In Part Because Their Teachers Had Other Ideas About Their Plans

  49. To break through these old attitudes, cannot equivocate. ALL students must graduate from high school ready for postsecondary education.

  50. #2. It is increasingly clear that student success--in college, on assessments, and in gaining access to decent jobs--depends on completing a rigorous, college prep-level curriculum.