bishop s committee on the liturgy music in catholic worship 1972
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BISHOP’S COMMITTEE ON THE LITURGY, MUSIC IN CATHOLIC WORSHIP (1972)

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bishop s committee on the liturgy music in catholic worship 1972
BISHOP’S COMMITTEE ON THE LITURGY, MUSIC IN CATHOLIC WORSHIP (1972)

“At times the choir, within the congregation of the faithful and as part of it, will assume the role of leadership, while at other times it will retain its own distinctive ministry. This means that the choir will lead the people in sung prayer, by alternating or reinforcing the sacred song of the congregation, or by enhancing it with the addition of a musical elaboration. At other times in the course of liturgical celebration the choir along will sing works whose musical demands enlist and challenge its competence.”

singing in english
SINGING IN ENGLISH
  • Primary vowels
  • Dipthongs
  • Consonants
  • Connecting/Dividing Syllables within the Word
  • Connecting/Separating Words
  • What not to Stress
  • Special Rules
  • Beginnings and Endings
  • Inertia
vowels
VOWELS
  • Basic building block of all singing is the vowel
  • Primary vowels sounds: ooh (who); oh (woe); ah (lah); ay (way); ee (we)
    • Remember, sing to the end of the vowel sound and sustain its tone quality
    • Do not change the quality of the vowel as you ascend higher notes
diphthongs
DIPHTHONGS
  • Diphthong is a sound formed by two consecutive vowels in one syllable
  • Each component of a diphthong is sounded distinctly, e.g., day (day-ee); high (hah-ee); new (nee-oo), etc. The first vowel sound, however, is generally given prominence.
consonants
CONSONANTS
  • Consonants may be considered as the gates through which we pass from one vowel sound to the next.
  • Consonants are either voiced (resonant-this requires a vocalized sound or unvoiced (non-resonant- requires a blowing of air).
    • Singers take care that you sing
      • “On the vine” not to be sung as “On the fine”
  • VOICELESS VOICED
    • t d
    • f v
    • p b
    • s z
connecting dividing syllables within the word
Connecting/Dividing Syllables within the Word
  • Printed Sung
    • Seat-ed sea-ted
    • Dif-fer-ence di-ffe-rence
    • Bless-ed ble-sed
    • Mas-ter ma-ster
  • Consonants are generally carried forward so that they begin the next syllable.
connecting separating words
Connecting/Separating Words
  • If the first word ends in a consonant, this consonant is quite often carried over to the second word: e.g., kiss me (ki-sme); his own (hi-zown)
  • When the same consonants occur at the end of one word and at the beginning of the second word, generally omit one of the consonants; e.g., send down (sen-down)
  • When the first word ends in the same vowel sound that begins the second word, separate the two words: e.g., three / eagles (and not threeeagles).
  • Always separate words if a mistake in hearing would occur by linking them together: e.g., deaf / ears (not dea-fears).
    • Words may be separated to give them special effect: e.g.,
      • His / silent journey.
what not to stress
What NOT to Stress
  • Do not stress prepositions (of, at, to), conjunctions (and), or articles (the, a, an).
  • Do not emphasize consonants like s, z, sh, ch, and the soft c. Doing so results in a very unmusical effect. Generally these consonants are linked to the following syllable or word: e.g., ma-ster
a consonant with special rules
A Consonant with Special Rules
  • The consonant r has some special rules
  • It is never sung before another consonant:
    • e.g., summer day sung day summe’ day
  • It is not sung before a pause
  • It is always sung before a vowel
    • LOOK AHEAD!

ALWAYS SING TO THE END OF THE WORD,

TO THE END OF THE PHRASE

beginnings and endings
BEGINNINGS and ENDINGS
  • A slight unobtrusive h sound helps facilitate attacks that begin with a vowel: e.g., (h) O bone Jesu.
  • Singers need to pay special attention to releases concluding with consonants like s,z,sh,ch to avoid the “snake” effect: e.g., fears sung as fearssssss. The same is true for the final d and t.
  • Overcome the natural inertia found in daily speech. e.g., “Whaujheet?” for “What did you eat?” Do not “sing as we speak”
singing latin

SINGING LATIN

PRONUNCIATION

VOWELS

CONSONANTS

vowels12
VOWELS

Letter English Word Latin Word

a father pater

e, ae, oe red etiam or caelum

i, y feet gloria

o foe Deo

u tune cum

consonants13
CONSONANTS

b Pronounced as in English

c 1) pronounced ch (as in church) before I,e, ae, oe, y:

e.g., caeli (che-lee)

2) cc before those same vowels is pronounced t-ch:

e.g., ecce (et-che)

3) at all other times c is pronounced as k:

e.g., cum (koom)

4) ch is always pronounced as k:

e.g., chorus (ko-roos)

slide14
d pronounced as in English

f pronounced as in English

g 1) always soft (as in general) before e, i, ae, oe, y: e.g., genitor

2) gn is pronounced ny: e.g., magnum (mah-nyam)

3) before all other vowels the g is hard, as in government

slide15
h 1) silent

2) except for mihi and nihil

(mee-hee,nee-heel

j often written as I and pronounced as y forming one sound with the following vowel: e.g., jam (yam)

k, l, m, n, p and q: pronounced as in English

r rolled slightly with the tongue

slide16
s 1) hard (as in sea)

2) slightly softened when it occurs between two vowels: e.g., misericordia

3) sc before e, I, ae, oe, y, is pronounced like the English sh (as in shed): e.g., suscepi (su-she-pee)

t 1) pronounced as in English: e.g., totus

2) ti appearing before a vowel and following any letter (except s, x, t) is pronounced t-see:

e.g., gratia (grat-see-a)

slide17
th pronounced as t:

e.g., catholicam (ka-to-lee-kam)

v pronounced as in English

x 1) like the English ks: e.g., (exercitus (eks-er-chee-tus)

2) xc before e, ae, oe, i, y is pronounced as ksh: (excelsis)

3) before other vowels xc has the hard sounds of the letters composing it: e.g., excussorum (eks-coos-so-rum)

slide18
z (rare in liturgical Latin)

pronounced dz:

e.g., zona (dzo-na)

  • Double consonants: clearly sound each consonant: e.g., bello (bel-lo)

terra (ter ra)

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