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Q6 – What are typical knowledge-management applications?. The characteristics and goals of knowledge management applications and systems are to Create value for an organization from its intellectual capital Share knowledge among and between employees, managers, suppliers, and customers

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Q6 – What are typical knowledge-management applications?


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    1. Q6 – What are typical knowledge-management applications? • The characteristics and goals of knowledge management applications and systems are to • Create value for an organization from its intellectual capital • Share knowledge among and between employees, managers, suppliers, and customers • Include knowledge that is known to exist in documents or employees’ brains • Foster innovation by encouraging the free flow of ideas • Improve customer service by streamlining response times • Boost revenues by getting products and services to market faster • Enhance employee retention rates by recognizing the value of employees’ knowledge and rewarding them for it • Streamline operations and reduce costs by eliminating redundant or unnecessary processes • Preserve organizational memory by capturing and storing lessons learned and the best practices of key employees. • The three major categories of knowledge assets are data, documents, and employees. © Pearson Prentice Hall 2009

    2. Q6 – What are typical knowledge-management applications? • Two key technologies for sharing content in KM systems are: • Indexing—the single most important content function in KM applications. It’s an easily accessible and robust means of determining if content exists and includes a link to obtain the content. It’s used in conjunction with search functions. • RSS, Real Simple Syndication—a standard for subscribing to content sources on Web sites. It uses an RSS Reader program that helps users • subscribe to content sources. • periodically check sources for new or updated content through RSS feeds. • place content summaries in an RSS inbox with a link to the full content. © Pearson Prentice Hall 2009

    3. Q6 – What are typical knowledge-management applications? • This figure shows a typical RSS reader. The left pane shows RSS sources. Entries are grouped into categories predetermined by the user. Fig 9-19 Interface of a Typical RSS Reader © Pearson Prentice Hall 2009

    4. Q6 – What are typical knowledge-management applications? • Blogs provide an easy way to share knowledge as seen in this figure. You can use RSS feeds to subscribe to thousands of blogs. Fig 9-20 Blog Posts of SharePoint Team Member © Pearson Prentice Hall 2009

    5. Q6 – What are typical knowledge-management applications? • Another form of knowledge management are expert systems. Here are characteristics about them along with some of their problems: • They capture human expertise and format it for use by nonexperts. • They are rule-based systems that use if…then rules. • They gather data from people rather than using data-mining techniques. • They are difficult and expensive to develop. • They are difficult to maintain because the rules are constantly changing. • They have been unable to live up to the high expectations set by their name. © Pearson Prentice Hall 2009

    6. Q6 – What are typical knowledge-management applications? • This is an example of the output from a medical expert system that is part of a decision support system. Based on the system’s rules, an alert is issued if the system detects a problem with a patient’s prescriptions. Fig 9-21 Alert from Pharmacy Clinical Decision Support System © Pearson Prentice Hall 2009