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Power the Fight: Capturing the Smart Microgrid Potential for DoD Installation Energy Security. A Briefing of the BENS Report. January 16, 2013. Business Executives for National Security (BENS) is a national non-partisan organization.

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power the fight capturing the smart microgrid potential for dod installation energy security
Power the Fight: Capturing the Smart Microgrid Potential for DoD Installation Energy Security

A Briefing of the BENS Report

January 16, 2013

business executives for national security bens is a national non partisan organization
Business Executives for NationalSecurity (BENS) is a nationalnon-partisan organization
  • BENS mission is to apply best private business solutions to our most difficult national security challenges ranging from cyber threat and energy security to threat finance
  • BENS members come from a wide range of enterprises, most with no relationship to the defense industry
  • BENS assembled a study group from across industry to consider the question of DoDmicrogrids

BENS has only one special interest:

to help make America safe and secure

overview
Overview
  • Background and Context
  • Report Findings and Observations
  • Report Recommendations
dod owns and operates a large diverse portfolio of bases
DoD owns and operates a large,diverse portfolio of bases
  • 500 Military installations, 300,000 buildings
  • Diverse building mix of various vintages: barracks, commissaries, data centers, office buildings, laboratories, aircraft maintenance depots
  • DoD’s facility energy strategy seeks to reduce energy costs and improve the energy security by: 
    • Reducing demand for traditional energy through conservation and energy efficiency
    • Expanding supply of renewable energy and other forms of distributed (on-site) energy
    • Enhancing the energy security of our installations directly
    • Leveraging advanced technology
the reliance of dod installations on the commercial electric power grid is a growing vulnerability
The reliance of DoD installationson the commercial electric power gridis a growing vulnerability
  • Defense Science Board (2008)

“Military installations are almost completely dependent on a fragile and vulnerable commercial power grid, placing critical military and Homeland defense missions at unacceptable risk of extended outage”

  • Since 2008, reliance of DoD installations on commercial grid has become more operations-critical
    • Increasing C4ISR sophistication
    • Remote combat operations
    • Homeland defense, humanitarian missions

“Tornadoes knock out power to Redstone Arsenal and Marshall Space Flight Center” (4/2011)

NYT: “Terrorist Attack on Grid Could Cause Broad Hardship, Report Says”

“Panetta: US Vulnerable to ‘Cyber-Pearl Harbor’”

in august 2011 dod encouraged the bens microgrid study with specific questions
In August 2011, DoD encouragedthe BENS microgrid study, withspecific questions
  • Business model
    • Ownerships
    • Effects of utility privatization
  • Size and scope
  • Non-technical impediments to deployment

“Micro-grid technology could be a potential ‘triple play’ for the DoD” (energy security, energy efficiencyand renewables integration)

smart microgrids are a potential solution to the energy security needs of dod installations
“Smart Microgrids” are apotentialsolution to the energysecurity needs of DoD installations
  • Microgrid = integrated system of electricity generation, distribution infrastructure, and energy storage (as needed) to enable an installation to maintain power while disconnected from commercial grid
  • Smart Microgrid = added communications and control technology to drive greater value-generation (especially from energy efficiency and demand response) and renewable energy integration
overview1
Overview
  • Background and Context
  • Report Findings and Observations
  • Report Recommendations
microgrids can be cost effective saving dod at least 225m year increasing energy security
Microgrids can be cost-effective,saving DoD at least $225M/year,increasing energy security
  • $4 B/yr installation energy budget
  • 25% of installations in States with high electricity prices, strong renewable incentives
  • 15-20% cost savings/installation
  • Achievement of savings is dependent on use of third-party financing and public-private approaches

2013 ADC INSTALLATION INNOVATION FORUM | pAGE10

significantly greater savings are possible with new approaches and stronger dod capabilities
Significantly greater savings arepossible with new approaches andstronger DoD capabilities
  • Fully utility-integrated microgrid (and other energy security solutions) maximize the economic benefits of on-base electrical resources (generation, distribution, management)
    • Requires specific local utility “discovery” and negotiation
    • Requires a more detailed understanding of installation energy use
  • “Bundling” generation, efficiency, and demand-response opportunities at individual installations would maximize third-party incentives, cost reductions
    • Complicated by utility privatization, lack of coordination of current installation energy programs (ESPC, ECIP)
  • Bidding portfolios of bases, with varying project economics, could most economically extend microgrid development to bases facing a “security premium” for power
significantly greater savings are possible with new approaches and stronger dod capabilities 2
Significantly greater savings arepossible with new approaches andstronger DoD capabilities (2)
  • DoD needs to increase the consistency and quality of data it has about installation energy management
  • To support effective decision making and dealmaking, DoD needs understand models, terminology, and approaches used by the private sector
    • Levelized Cost of Secure Energy
    • Open standards
    • Performance-based systems acquisition
other task force observations
Other Task Force Observations
  • Standard blueprint or template for how military installations purchase or distribute electric power does not exist
  • DoD has undertaken significant microgrid technology demonstration and prototype development efforts to increase understanding of the technical challenges and opportunities
  • Installation energy security does not require a technological breakthrough
  • There is no clear vision of energy management evident at DoD installations with respect to:
    • Allowable or “approved” components, generation, and control technologies
    • Design bases (spatial, temporal) for mission assurance objectives
overview2
Overview
  • Background and Context
  • Report Findings and Observations
  • Report Recommendations
report recommendations
Report Recommendations
  • DoD needs to establish energy security requirements for Defense installations
    • Define the “design basis threat” energy security solutions must meet (drives requirements for outage duration, fuel supply chain, etc.)
  • DoD needs an organizational approach for microgrid development that supports timely decision making and development of an enduring capability within DoD
    • Single technical authority for engineering analysis and design
    • Single point of contact for finance and electric power industries
    • Business capability in analytics and economic tradeoffs
    • Maximize discretion in acquisition procedures and regulations

Start

Start

Immediate

Immediate

Impact

Impact

Medium-Term

Near-Term

report recommendations 2
Report Recommendations (2)
  • DoD should begin a dialogue with leadership from the electric power and finance sectors to build model agreements that support microgrid design, operations, and investment
  • DoD should support legislative changes that would remove impediments to microgrid investment and expand the pool of investors
      • Eliminate requirement for DoD retention of RECs
      • Expand MLPs, REITs to allow for renewable generation, microgrids

Start

Start

Medium-Term

Near-term

Impact

Impact

Long-Term

Medium- to Long-Term

dod should pursue 6 to 8 at scale microgrid development projects
DoD should pursue 6 to 8 at-scale microgrid development projects

Two goals:

Gain key insights into influence of technology choices on business models

Develop multidisciplinary capabilities needed to envision, analyze, negotiate successful microgrid with full range of industry partners

Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, NJ

California

Redstone Arsenal, AL

MacDill AFB, FL

Fort Bliss, TX

Camp H.M. Smith, HI