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  1. Before Reading_Main Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 1. Warm-up Questions 2. The Second World War 3. Nazi 4. Auschwitz 5. Requiem

  2. Before Reading_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Warm-up Questions 1. 2. 3. What do you know about Hitler? Do you know anything about the concentration camp? What do you know about the Second World War?

  3. Before Reading_2_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Some special terms 1) The Allies (同盟国): Britain the US the USSR

  4. Before Reading_2_2_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 2) The Axis (轴心国): Germany Italy Japan

  5. Before Reading_2_2_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Chronology The Second World War in Europe started with the German armies pouring across the Polish frontier. September 1, 1939 Denmark and Norway were conquered. April, 1940

  6. Before Reading_2_2_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Hitler’s troops drove into France and within the following six weeks, Holland, Belgium and Luxembourg surrendered just as France did. May 10, 1940 Hitler launched his long-term attack on the Soviet Union. June 22, 1941

  7. Before Reading_2_2_3 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading A decisive battle was fought at Stalingrad, which was the turning point of the war. September, 1942 — February, 1943 The U. S. A. entered the war after the Japanese planes bombed the American naval base at Pearl Harbor. December, 1941

  8. Before Reading_2_2_3 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading American, British and Canadian forces landed in Normandy and opened the second front in Europe. June 6, 1944 The Soviet army conquered Berlin. May 2, 1945 Germany surrendered. May 7, 1945

  9. Before Reading_3_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading ■

  10. Before Reading_3_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Adolf Hitler’s invasion of Poland in September, 1939, ignited (点燃) World War II. One by one, Europe’s nations surrendered before Germany’s mechanized armies. Only Britain held firm. While the Allies (同盟国) conferred (协商), treachery (背叛) approached from the East. On December 7th, 1941, the Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor. The next day, the United States entered the war. The war continued for almost four more years, spreading to North Africa and the Pacific area. On “D-Day”, June 6, 1944, the Allied troops began the liberation of Europe. Within a year, Germany surrendered. To subdue (使屈服) Japan, the United States dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Then Japan formally surrendered on September 2, 1945. World War II claimed more than 27 million deaths and caused enormous human sufferings.

  11. Before Reading_3_2_POP Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Some famous figures in the war 1) Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler was the German dictator and the founder of the Nazi party. His anti-Semitism and aggressive policies led Germany on the road to World War II. Mein Kampf (My Struggle) written in prison sums up his anti-Semitism, worship of power, disdain for morality and strategy for world domination. ■

  12. Before Reading_3_3_1_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Hitler was born at Braunau, Austria April 20, 1889 Hitler joined a small political group —National Socialist German Workers’ Party. 1919 Hitler began to write My Struggle, an autobiography in which he expressed his hatred for the Jews, his worship of power, and his plans to conquer the world. 1923 Hitler became Chancellor of a coalition government — Nazi. January 30, 1933

  13. Before Reading_3_3_1_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Hitler proclaimed his regime as the “New Order” and the German state as “ The Third Reich” 1934 Hitler began secretly to rearm Germany in violation of the Versailles Treaty. 1933-1935 Hitler launched the Second World War. September 1, 1939 Hitler killed himself April 30, 1945

  14. Before Reading_3_3_1_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 2) Benito Mussolini Benito Mussolini was the leader of Italy from 1922 to 1943. He founded the first fascist political group and later allied his country with Germany in World War II. His clenched fist, jutting jaw, fiery speeches, and dramatic poses became his trademarks. ■

  15. Before Reading_3_3_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 3) Churchill Sir Winston Leonard Spencer (1874-1965) Churchill was British politician and prime minister of the United Kingdom (1940-1945, 1951-1955), and was widely regarded as the greatest British leader of the 20th century. ■

  16. Before Reading_3_3_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 4)Stalin, Joseph (1879 - 1953) Stalin was the General secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (USSR) from 1922 to 1953. ■

  17. Before Reading_3_3_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 5)De Gaulle, Charles André Joseph Marie (1890 - 1970) De Gaulle was the French general and statesman, the founder of the Fifth French Republic and its first president (1959 - 1969). ■

  18. Before Reading_3_4 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Nazi Spurred by the emotional speeches of Adolf Hitler, the National Socialist Party took control of Germany in 1933. The Nazis then reorganized Germany into a totalitarian (极权主义)state. Their systematic genocide(种族屠杀)of millions of Jews was the most tragic aspect of their rise to power. Nazi military aggression in Europe sparked World War II, one of the bloodiest wars in human history. Germany’s defeat in World War II ended the Nazi regime. ■

  19. Before Reading_3_5 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Auschwitz ■

  20. Before Reading_3_5 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Auschwitz Directions: Fill in the blanks with the words or phrases you hear. _____ On a clear day in August 1944, an air reconnaissance plane (空中侦察机) flew over southern Poland. Its plant. But when they were developed, the aerial photographs showed more than just a Nazi factory. by accident, the aircraft had taken photographs of another seven kilometers away. It was the Nazi’s most evil The true horror of is captured here. A train has just arrived. The SS guards are selecting fit prisoners to be with a number and sent to work in the camp. The others, the old, the young and the weak, are sent straight to the gas and then burnt in one of five crematoria (火葬场), which was clearly seen here. One moment on the photograph was just one second within three years of killing. allied _______ mission was to photograph a new Nazi chemical ______ Purely ___________ extermination complex _______ camp, Auschwitz. genocide _______ _______ tattooed chambers ________ captured _______ continuous _________ ■

  21. Before Reading_3_5_POP Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 1. Verdi’s Requiem Requiem is a musical setting of the Roman Catholic Funeral Mass for the souls of the dead, performed on All Souls’ Day and at funerals. The Requiem by Giuseppe Verdi, Italian operatic composer, was completed to mark the first anniversary of the death of Alessandro Manzoni, an Italian poet and novelist much admired by Verdi. The piece is also sometimes referred to as the Manzoni Requiem. ■

  22. Before Reading_3_5_POP Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Listen to the two famous requiems. 1)Requiem by Verdi 2)Requiem by Mozart

  23. Globe Reading_main Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 1. Part Division of the Text 2. Further Understanding For Part 1& Part 2 True or False For Part 3 & Part 4 Questions 3. Chart Completion

  24. Globe Reading._1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Part Division of the Text Parts Paragraphs Main Ideas In Terezin, we could not only recall the suffering days but also the triumph. 1 1 2 2~14 Rafael Schaechter managed to organize a choir singing the song of Verdi’s Requiem as a defiance against Nazi. The performance of the choir successfully defied the Nazis though they did not realize it. 3 15~22 Marianka May showed her great respect for Rafael Schaechter. 4 23

  25. Globe Reading_2_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading True or False Directions: Decide whether the following statements about the text are true or false. • Terezin was also a scene of triumph because finally all the Nazis there were killed. () F Terezin was also a scene of triumph because some of the Jews there in the camp successfully sang their song of defiance to the Nazis. 2. In contrast to other extermination camps, Terezin had been designed by Nazis to cheat people all over the world. T ( ) () 3. Jews in Terezin lived at leisure. F Jews in Terezin lived a miserable life.

  26. Globe Reading_2_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading 4. SS troops were not posted in the fortress because a Jewish “Council of Elders” was able to watch inmates’ activities. () F Because the camp made concessions for propaganda purposes. () 5. Schaechter was already well-known in prewar Prague. F Schaechter was just beginning to make a name for himself at that time. 6. The chorus members still stuck to their rehearsals though they were very hungry. T ( ) 7. Warned by the camp’s Jewish elders, Schaechter asked someone of the chorus to leave. () F Since it was quite dangerous to attend the special rehearsals, Schaecher allowed anyone to leave if he or she wanted to.

  27. Globe Reading_3_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Questions 1. How did the audience enjoy the performance? 2. Whose Requiem were the Jews singing? 3. Did Nazis like the Requiem? Why or why not? 4. What did Marianka May think of Schaechter and the Requiem?

  28. Globe Reading_3_2_1 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Chart Completion Directions: Fill in the chart according to the text. Time Events About Schaechter he was just beginning to make a name for himself in the rich cultural mix of prewar Prague. Before World War began, II After being kept in the camp for several years, his fury at his captors steadily grew and he thought of using the Requiem as the weapon. In the autumn of 1943, the first performance conducted by Schaechter took place and it impressed the prisoners.

  29. Globe Reading_3_2_2 Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Time Events About Schaechter the performance was repeated several times for the additional audience of prisoners. Over the ensuing months, When Red Cross representatives visited the camp, the performance was set for a face-to-face confrontation between the defiant Jews and the man behind the Final Solution — Adolf Eichmann. Soon after the final performance, Schaechter and nearly all his chorus members were loaded into boxcars bound for Auschwitz. Schaechter was never seen again.

  30. Article Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading They confronted the Nazis with the only weapon they had: their voices.

  31. Article Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger.

  32. Article2_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Yet the camp made concessions for propaganda purposes. SS troops were posted outside the fortress, while daily activity was overseen by a Jewish “Council of Elders,” which turned a blind eye to inmates’ activities, unless they might attract Nazi attention. So, amid the pervasive atmosphere of death, writers managed to write, painters to paint, and composers to compose. Among them was Rafael Schaechter, a conductor in his mid-30s. Charismatic, with a striking face and wavy, dark hair, Schaechter was just beginning to make a name for himself in the rich cultural mix of prewar Prague. He had scarcely thought of himself as Jewish at all, until he was seized by the Nazis. As his months in the camp stretched into years, and more and more Jews disappeared eastward on Nazi transports, Schaechter’s fury at his captors steadily grew. And then he thought of a daring plan.

  33. Article3_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading He confessed his idea to his roommate in a single sentence: “We can sing to the Nazis what we can’t say to them.” Their weapon was to be Verdi’s Requiem. Everything that Schaechter wanted to say lay camouflaged within the Latin words of the Requiem, with its themes of God’s wrath and human liberation. Schaechter had access to no musical instruments except a broken harmonium found in a rubbish heap. Other than that, he had only human voices to work with. Throwing himself into the plan, he managed to recruit 150 singers. Among the group was a brown-eyed teenager named Marianka May. During her 12-hour workday, she labored at everything from scrubbing windows to making tobacco pouches for German soldiers. At night, however, she slipped away to join the choir, where she felt lifted up by Verdi’s music and Schaechter’s passion. “Without Rafi Schaechter, we’d never have survived,” says May, one of the tiny handful of chorus members to live through the war. “He saved us through his music.”

  34. Article4_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Aching with hunger, sopranos and altos, tenors and basses would take their places, while Schaechter pounded out Verdi’s towering themes on the harmonium. Since there was only a single score, the singers had to memorize their parts, in Latin, a language that few besides Schaechter understood. When they rehearsed the key section called “Day of Wrath,” Schaechter explained that it meant God would judge all men — including the Nazis — by their deeds and they would one day pay for their crimes against the Jews. “We are putting a mirror to them,” he said. “Their fate is sealed.” Although the Germans had spies among the prisoners, Schaechter managed to keep the real meaning behind the chorus’s rehearsals a secret. Still, the camp’s Jewish elders were upset. “The Germans will deport your whole chorus, and hang you,” they warned Schaechter at a stormy meeting.

  35. Article5_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading That night Schaechter told his chorus, “What we are doing is dangerous. If anyone wants to leave, you may go.” No one left. At last, in the autumn of 1943, all was ready. The first performance took place for prisoners gathered in a former gymnasium. Someone had found an old piano missing a leg and propped it on a crate. During the performance, a technician kept it in tune with a pair of pliers. Verdi’s music burned through the audience like an electrical charge, and many remember it as one of the most powerful events of their lives. The Requiem was like food put in front of them. They gnawed at it from sheer hunger. Over the ensuing months, the Requiem was repeated several times for additional audiences of prisoners.

  36. Article5_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Then Schaechter received an order from the camp’s commandant to stage a command performance of the Requiem. This would be “in honor” of a visit by Red Cross representatives who, fooled by the Nazis, would notoriously report that the Jews were living in comfort at Terezin. There would also be high Nazi officials present — among them, an SS lieutenant colonel named Adolf Eichmann. The scene was set for a face-to-face confrontation between defiant Jews and the man behind the Final Solution. Despite his best efforts, Schaechter could muster only 60 singers for the chorus. Emaciated, they gathered on the small stage. Eichmann sat in the front row, dressed in full Nazi regalia. The Jews looked the Nazis in their eyes, and their voices swelled as they sang: The day of wrath, that day shall dissolve the world in ash. … What trembling there shall be when the judge shall come. … Nothing shall remain unavenged.

  37. Article6_S Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading When the performance ended, there was no applause. The Nazis rose in silence. As he left, Eichmann was heard to say, with a smirk, “So they’re singing their own requiem.” He never realized the Jews were singing his. Soon after, Schaechter and nearly all his chorus members were loaded into boxcars bound for Auschwitz. Schaechter was never seen again. Marianka May was among those freed when Allied troops reached Terezin. “I believed in nothing in that camp,” says May, with a look in her eyes that takes in both the death-filled streets of Terezin and the soothing hills of upstate New York, where she now lives. “I would say to myself, ‘Is God there? If so, then how could these children be dying?’ Schaechter wasn’t a religious man. But what was it but God that he gave us in the music?”

  38. Article1_W Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger.

  39. Article1_S_Half of Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. What can we infer from this sentence? The streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic remind us of the suffering days of the village sixty years ago, when the Jews were tortured by Nazis.

  40. Article1_S_…are getting Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. Paraphrase the sentence. From the evidence provided by Nazis it seemed that during much of the time in World War II, Jews were quite relaxed in the concentration camp and the seized Jewish filmmakers were even told by Nazis to produce a movie showing Jews enjoying lectures and basking in the sun.

  41. Article1_W_shroud Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading shroud: v. cover or hide sth. Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich The mist shrouding the valley had lifted by eight o’clock. 突然所有的灯都灭了,房间笼罩在黑暗之中。 Suddenly all the lights went out and the house was shrouded in darkness. When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. CF: conceal, hide, screen & shroud 这四个词都是动词,均有“隐藏,遮蔽”的意思。 conceal 正式用词,多强调有目的、有意识,巧妙地进行隐藏或隐瞒。 例如: She tried to conceal the fact that she was pregnant. 她设法隐瞒她怀孕的事实。 hide 普通用词,既可指有意地隐藏,又可指无意或偶然地藏匿。例如: Mary hid the pictures in her drawer. 玛丽把照片藏在她的抽屉里。 screen 指把处于被发现的人或物掩盖起来,使其不被发现。例如: She raised her hand to screen her eyes from the bright light. 她抬起手遮住眼睛,阻挡强光。 shroud 强调通过覆盖或围绕来遮住事物。例如: Visitors have complained about the scaffolding that shrouds half the castle. 参观者抱怨脚手架遮住了城堡的一半。

  42. Article1_W_triumph Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. triumph: n. an important victory or success Winning the championship is a great personal triumph. 通过接种疫苗根除天花是医学界最伟大的胜利之一。 The eradication of smallpox by vaccination was one of the medicine field’s greatest triumphs.

  43. Article1_W_perverse Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich perverse: adj. behaving in an unreasonable way, especially by deliberately doing the opposite of what people want you to do When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. Jack was being perverse and refusing to agree with anything we said. 听说她妹妹离婚了,她有一种反常的愉快。 She took a perverse pleasure in hearing that her sister was getting divorced.

  44. Article1_W_propaganda Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. propaganda: n. information false or true used by a government or political group to make people agree with them One official dismissed the ceasefire as a mere propaganda exercise. 他们是政府的宣传机器。 They are the government propaganda machines.

  45. Article1_W_captive Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich captive: 1. adj. kept in prison or in a place that you are not allowed to leave When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. His son had been taken captive during the raid. 这个飞行员已经被俘虏六年了。 The pilot has been hold captive for six years. 2. n. someone who is kept as a prisoner, especially in a war All the captives were kept in a darkened room with their hand tied. Collocations: be captive to 受制于 captive audience 受制而走不开的听众 captive market 垄断市场 hold / take somebody captive 俘虏某人

  46. Article1_W_bask Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich bask: v. enjoy sitting or lying in the heat of the sun or a fire; enjoy the approval or attention that you are getting from other people When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. Lizards were basking in the morning sun. 她举起奖杯面对人群,沉浸在荣耀中。 She basked in her moment of glory, holding the trophy up to the crowd.

  47. Article1_W_stuff Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading stuff: Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich 1. v. push or put sth. into a small space, esp. in a careless way She stuffed two more sweaters into her bag. When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. 在他的床下,他们发现了一个装满钱的袋子。 Under his bed, they found a bag stuffed with money. 2. n. a substance or a group of things or ideas, etc. Where’s all the camping stuff? NB: stuff oneself with… 是一个习惯用语,意为“吃得过饱”。例如: The kids have been stuffing themselves with candy. They’d been stuffing themselves with snacks all the afternoon, so they didn’t want any dinner. Collocations: all that stuff 所有的东西/事 露一手 do / show your stuff good stuff 好东西 擅长,知道如何做 know one’s stuff hot stuff 奇才,非凡的事物

  48. Article1_W_infest Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Song of Defiance Fergus M. Bordewich infest: v. if insects, rat, etc. infest a place, there are a lot of them and they usually cause damage When you walk the cobbled mist-shrouded streets of Terezin in the Czech Republic, your mind fills with images of the village sixty years ago, when it was a Nazi concentration camp packed with desperate and dying Jews. But Terezin was not only a place of suffering. It was also a scene of triumph. Terezin had been a perverse kind of showcase. In contrast to Auschwitz, Treblinka and other extermination camps, the Nazis designed the town near Prague to fool the world. For much of World War II, Nazi propaganda suggested that Jews there enjoyed a life of leisure, even using captive Jewish filmmakers to craft a movie showing “happy ” Jews listening to lectures and basking in the sun. The reality was horribly different. As many as 58,000 Jews were stuffed into a town that had originally held 7,000. Medical supplies were almost nonexistent, beds were infested with vermin and toilets overflowed. Of the 150,000 prisoners who passed through Terezin, 35,000 died there, mostly from disease and hunger. The kitchen was infested with cockroaches. 谷仓里有成群的老鼠出没。 The barn was infested with rats.

  49. Article2_W Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Yet the camp made concessions for propaganda purposes. SS troops were posted outside the fortress, while daily activity was overseen by a Jewish “Council of Elders,” which turned a blind eye to inmates’ activities, unless they might attract Nazi attention. So, amid the pervasive atmosphere of death, writers managed to write, painters to paint, and composers to compose. Among them was Rafael Schaechter, a conductor in his mid-30s. Charismatic, with a striking face and wavy, dark hair, Schaechter was just beginning to make a name for himself in the rich cultural mix of prewar Prague. He had scarcely thought of himself as Jewish at all, until he was seized by the Nazis. As his months in the camp stretched into years, and more and more Jews disappeared eastward on Nazi transports, Schaechter’s fury at his captors steadily grew. And then he thought of a daring plan.

  50. Article2_S_That was more… Before Reading Global Reading Detailed Reading After Reading Yet the camp made concessions for propaganda purposes. SS troops were posted outside the fortress, while daily activity was overseen by a Jewish “Council of Elders,” which turned a blind eye to inmates’ activities, unless they might attract Nazi attention. So, amid the pervasive atmosphere of death, writers managed to write, painters to paint, and composers to compose. Among them was Rafael Schaechter, a conductor in his mid-30s. Charismatic, with a striking face and wavy, dark hair, Schaechter was just beginning to make a name for himself in the rich cultural mix of prewar Prague. He had scarcely thought of himself as Jewish at all, until he was seized by the Nazis. 1. Translate the sentence into Chinese. 党卫队只在城堡的外面设岗,营内日常活动由一个犹太人“长老委员会”监管。只要关押在里面的人的言行不引起纳粹的注意,该委员会装着视而不见。 2. Analyze the structure of the sentence. 本句中在while引导的从句中含有一个which 引导的非限制性定语从句,定语从句中又嵌套有一个由unless引导的让步状语从句。 As his months in the camp stretched into years, and more and more Jews disappeared eastward on Nazi transports, Schaechter’s fury at his captors steadily grew. And then he thought of a daring plan.