providing supporting and sustaining rigorous instruction focus on inquiry n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
“Providing, Supporting, and Sustaining Rigorous Instruction” Focus on Inquiry PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
“Providing, Supporting, and Sustaining Rigorous Instruction” Focus on Inquiry

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 34

“Providing, Supporting, and Sustaining Rigorous Instruction” Focus on Inquiry - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 133 Views
  • Uploaded on

“Providing, Supporting, and Sustaining Rigorous Instruction” Focus on Inquiry. June 8 th , 2010 Presenter: Jessica Chafin. Think About It. Here. Exponential growth of information will lead educators to:. Embrace digital and global culture Embrace student centered learning

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

“Providing, Supporting, and Sustaining Rigorous Instruction” Focus on Inquiry


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
providing supporting and sustaining rigorous instruction focus on inquiry

“Providing, Supporting, and Sustaining Rigorous Instruction”Focus on Inquiry

June 8th, 2010

Presenter: Jessica Chafin

exponential growth of information will lead educators to
Exponential growth of information will lead educators to:
  • Embrace digital and global culture
  • Embrace student centered learning
  • Foster interdependent learning styles
  • Assist students as they become independent, self-directed and lifelong learners
what can we do
What Can We Do?

Help students learn explicit strategies that inform and organize the way they do specific types of thinking.

Build into instruction significant opportunities for students to reflect on, monitor, evaluate, and plan their thinking.

Prompt specific engagements on the part of students in using the type of skillful thinkingbeing taught in thinking about the content they are learning.

Follow up specific lessons with opportunities for students to get more practiceguiding themselves to do the same sort of thinking in new situations.

Conducted in an environment wheregood thinking attitudes are modeledand where students are given opportunities to manifest those attitudes and reflect on their value.

habits of mind

Habits of Mind

"Habits of Mind are the characteristics of what intelligent people do when they are confronted with problems, the resolutions of which are not immediately apparent." (Costa)

the 16 habits of mind
The 16 Habits of Mind

Persisting

Thinking and communicating with clarity and precision

Managing impulsivity

Gathering data through all senses

Listening with understanding and empathy

Creating, imagining, innovating

Thinking flexibly

Responding with wonderment and awe

Thinking about thinking (metacognition)

Taking responsible risks

Striving for accuracy

Finding humor

Questioning and posing problems

Thinking interdependently

Applying past knowledge to new situations

Remaining open to continuous learning

why focus on inquiry
Why Focus on Inquiry?

“Teacher questioning strongly supports and advances students’ learning...”

  • Put Reading First, National Institute for Literacy
slide8

Why Focus on Inquiry?

  •  People are curious by nature
  • Curiosity comes from having a little bit of knowledge
  • Curiosity drives initial questioning
  • the act of questioning can be a more significant learning experience than getting the answer.   
  • "The formulation of a problem is often more essential that its solution."
  • - Albert Einstein
  • The most effective questions are asked by the student himself. 
  • Modeling challengingquestions fosters interest and curiosity
  • Posingmany, varied questions helps students increase their own habit of questioning and posing problems.
  • Good problem solvers = goodquestion askers
  • "To raise new questions, new possibilities, to regard old problems from a new angle, requires creative imagination and marks real advances." 
  • - Albert Einstein
slide9

SODAS Method

Establish the nature of the Problem S

Determine Possible Solutions O

Weigh the disadvantages of each option D

Weigh the advantages of each option and, A

Select the best course of action. S

example lesson 1 horton hatches the egg
Example Lesson #1: Horton Hatches the Egg

The students become little Horton, sitting on Maisie's egg after she goes off on a vacation for herself, just as he spots some hunters. What should he do? He's promised Maisie to take care of her egg, but these hunters pose a real threat to him.

The students develop a set of options (e.g., run away without the egg, fight the hunters, tell them what he is doing and ask them not to harm him) and then consider their pros and cons in terms of what would result if they adopted a specific option.

Then they compare them and decide which is best. These students learn how to explain why they think that the option they have chosen is best when asked for their reasons.

slide12

Example Lesson #2: Job and Money Management

You have a new job but no transportation

You have a new job but you don’t get paid for two weeks and you need new clothes

You have not job, but your rent and phone bills are due.

You’ve been holding down a job and you get paid every Thursday but by Monday all of your money is gone

slide13

Example Lesson #2: Job and Money Management

  • Options?
    • What could you do?
    • Now choose one of the options to explore
  • Results
    • What will happen?
    • List pros and cons
  • Choice
    • Is your choice a good one?
    • Why?
what do we know about the questions teachers ask
What do We Know about the Questions Teachers Ask?

Nearly 90% of teacher questions are low-level (even teachers that reported they wanted to engage students in higher level discourse)

Elliott, 1989.

slide15

Qualities of an Effective Questioner

  • Request data to support others' conclusions and assumptions
  • "What evidence do you have.....?" "How do you know that's true?"
  • Pose questions about alternative points of view:
  • "From whose viewpoint are we seeing, reading of hearing?"
  • "From what angle, what perspective are we viewing this situation?"
  • Make causal connections and relationships:
  • "How are these people (events) (situations) related to each other?"
  • "What produced this connection?"
  • Hypothetical problems characterized by "iffy"-type questions:
  • "What do you think would happen IF.....?"
  • "IF that is true, then what might happen if....?"
  • Recognize discrepancies and probe into their causes:
  • "Why do cats purr?"
  • "How high can birds fly?"
questioning and posing problems
Questioning and Posing Problems:
  • "Too often we give our children answers to remember rather than problems to solve”Roger Lewin
  • How do you know? 
  • Having a questioning attitude
  • Knowing what data are needed and developing questioning strategies to produce those data. 
  • Finding problems to solve.
slide17

Productive Questions Are:

  • Clear and Concise
  • Seldom asked by chance
  • Purposeful
  • Clear in content focus
  • Engaging to students at varied and appropriate cognitive levels
slide18

Unproductive Questions:

  • Verification questions the answers to that are already known

“What is the name of...........?”

“How many times did you .......?”

  • Closed questions that can be answered "yes", "no" , or "I can".
  • “Can you recite the poem?”
  • “Can you tell us the name of .....?”
  • “Who can remember.....?”
what do we know about students and questions
What do We Know about Students and Questions?
  • “…50 percent of student answers to oral questions posed by their teachers do not match the cognitive level of the questions themselves.” (Cotton, 1988)
  • “…students of all ability levels…can think at higher levels if given adequate support and instruction.” (Bulgren. Lenz, Marquis, Schumaker &Deshler, 2002).
slide21
Select an item from your purse, pocket, etc.

Place the item into the paper bag or envelope at your table.

Pass the bag or envelope around and have each member of your group select one item Write a Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 question for the item that you selected from the bag.

Share your questions in a random order with your group.

The group members will decide the level of each question shared and the person whose item is selected should answer the questions.

Inquiry in a Bag

slide22

Three Story Intellect

One-Two-Three Story Intellect Poem

There are one-story intellects,

two-story intellects,

and three-story intellects with skylights.

All fact collectors who have

no aim beyond their facts

are one-story people.

Two-story people compare, reason,

generalize, using the labor of

fact collectors as their own.

Three-story people idealize,

imagine, predict – their best illumination

comes through the skylight.

-Adapted from Oliver Wendall Holmes

slide23

Costa’s Three Levels

  • Factual Questions: Level 1
    • 1 correct answer
    • Answered by pointing to the text
  • Interpretive Questions: Level 2
    • More than one reasonable answer
    • Supported with evidence from the text
  • Evaluative/Universal Questions: Level 3
    • Abstract and does not pertain to the text
    • Ask that judgments be made from information
    • Give opinions about issues, judge the validity of ideas and justify opinions and ideas.
where is the answer what is it like
Where is the Answer & What is it like?

Level One

-in the text

-concrete pertaining only to the text

-facts about what has been heard or read.

Level Two

-inferred from the text

-abstract but dealing only with the text

-combine information in a new way.

Level Three

-beyond the text

-abstract not pertaining to the text

-provide judgments, opinions or justification

sample questions
Sample Questions

Level One

What is the setting of the play?

List the names of the members of the Younger family.

Level Two

Contrast George Murchison and Joseph Asagai.

Why does Ruth offer Walter Lee food and drink every time they have a disagreement?

Level Three

Imagine that Walter Lee accepts the offer from Mr. Linder not to move into Clybourne Park. What happens to each member of the Younger family next?

Where will the Younger family be in the next 10 years?

questioning strategies
Questioning Strategies
  • Factual Questions: Level 1
    • 1 correct answer
    • Answered by pointing to the text
  • Interpretive Questions: Level 2
    • More than one reasonable answer
    • Supported with evidence from the text
  • Evaluative/Universal Questions: Level 3
    • Abstract and does not pertain to the text
    • Ask that judgments be made from information
    • Give opinions about issues, judge the validity of ideas and justify opinions and ideas.
questioning strategies1
Questioning Strategies

Second Story Questions:

Where does this event take place? How do you know?

If you were a soldier in this scene, how would you be feeling now?

Why is this event taking place?

Is this picture like any others you have seen? How is it similar or different?

How is this view different from the traditional (Texan) view of The Battle of The Alamo?

questioning strategies2
Questioning Strategies

Third Story Questions:

What will soon happen in this place? Support with details.

Why is this event happening now? Support with details.

Write a short caption for this picture.

slide34

Sources

  • Habit of Minds website. http://www.habits-of-mind.net/
  • Costa, A. and Kallick, B. (2000) Habits of Mind. A Developmental Series. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
  • The National Center for Teaching Thinking website. http://www.nctt.net/
  • Sample Lesson: The National Center for Teaching Thinking: http://www.nctt.net/lesson_horton.html
  • Region V Avid
  • Avidonline.org
  • www.phy.ilstu.edu/programs/ptefiles/311content/inquiry/levels_of_inquiry.ppt
  • Texas Humanities Interactive, Artwork by Howard L. Hastings, cover illustration for J. Walker McSpadden, Texas, A Romantic Story for Young People, 1927