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Educational & Facilities Master Plan Update

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Educational & Facilities Master Plan Update

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  1. Educational & Facilities Master Plan Update College Forum October 21, 2005 Assignments 1 & 2 Updates and Student Learner Outcomes

  2. What is the desired outcome for the EFMP process? • A current plan that • Is educationally driven and supports student learning • Is meaningful, relevant and timely • Results from a transparent and inclusive process • Can be implemented within existing resources, both human and fiscal • Results in all programs and services having completed program review

  3. How will the results be used? • To guide improvement in student learning • To better respond to dynamic student and community needs • To provide the appropriate mix of instructional and support programs and services • To guide design of new facilities • To guide allocation of resources • To provide a foundation for ongoing planning and improvement

  4. Process & Time Line • 8/17 Planning agenda set with GAP • 8/26 College Forum • 9/30 Assignment #1 – Update from 2001 • 10/14 Assignment #2 – Student Learner Outcomes • 10/21 College Forum • 11/10 Assignment #3 – Future Directions • 12/2 College Forum • 1/26 College Forum • 4/21 College Forum • 5/3 GAP approval of EFMP

  5. 9:00 - 9:30 Continental breakfast 9:30 - 9:45 Welcome and opening remarks:  Frank Chong 9:45 - 10:15 Mission Statement:  Alex Braun 10:15 -12:00 Update of Programs & Services (Assignment #1) From the Present to the Future (Assignment #3) Daniel Peck, Harriett Robles 12:00 - 1:00 Lunch  1:00 - 1:45 Student Learning Outcomes (Assignment #2) Stephanie Kashima 1:45 - 2:00 Wrap-up:  Frank Chong Agenda

  6. Goals for Today • Obtain feedback on proposed revisions to mission statement • Become informed about college wide changes since 2001 • Identify areas for further research • Update progress on student learner outcomes • Prepare for Assignment #3 • Create a culture of evidence and develop an etiquette of inquiry that supports respectful, honest, critical and productive dialogue about the future directions of the college

  7. Mission Statement Drafts as of May 12, 2005

  8. Option A • Mission College advances lifelong learning through personalized, student-centered teaching. As an educational leader in the heart of Silicon Valley, we develop students’ basic and vocational skills, promote transfer to 4-year institutions, and award certificates and associate degrees. We prepare individuals to be change agents in our global community.

  9. Option B • Mission College, an educational leader in the Santa Clara Valley, is committed to excellence in student-centered teaching and learning. Through personalized service to our diverse and multicultural community, we provide the knowledge, information, skills, and aesthetic appreciation necessary to be responsible, effective, and creative leaders in an interdependent and ever-changing world.

  10. Option C1 • At Mission College, student success drives our teaching and learning and enhances our community vitality and individual achievement.

  11. Option C1.1 • At Mission College, student success drives our teaching and learning and enhances our community vitality and individual achievement. As an educational leader in the heart of Silicon Valley, we develop students’ basic and vocational skills, promote transfer to 4-year institutions, and award certificates and associate degrees. We prepare individuals to live responsibly, creatively, and effectively in in an interdependent and ever-changing world.

  12. Option C1.2 • At Mission College, student success drives our teaching and learning and enhances our community vitality and individual achievement. As an educational leader in the heart of Silicon Valley, we develop students’ basic and vocational skills, promote transfer to 4-year institutions, and award certificates and associate degrees. We prepare individuals to become agents for change in our global economy.

  13. Assignment #1 From 2001 to 2005

  14. Ready, Set…..Go! • Thanks for a great start! • What we are reviewing today in many ways is only the beginning • We will continue to update information and post it to the E&FMP website • As you prepare Assignment #3, we should work together to place information in context • Unique departmental and program factors • Larger and interconnected college, regional, and economic factors

  15. Brief Review of Enrollment Trends • Total enrollment by headcount has steadily decreased since the high of 10,594 in Fall 2002 • The largest increase in students by age has been in the group of students under 21, followed by those students over 40 • Mission College students are increasingly taking full-time loads (12+ units)

  16. Total Enrollment by Headcount Source: WVMCC PARIS System

  17. External Events & Enrollment Trends

  18. Day & Evening Enrollment Source: WVMCC Datatel Systems

  19. Headcount Enrollment by Age Source: WVMCC PARIS System

  20. Number of Units Enrolled Source: WVMCC PARIS System

  21. E&FMP Assignment #1 • Special thanks to Curtis Pembrook and Jennifer Ludwick • Participation of 95% • Many similarities across instructional programs, student services, and administration • Your thoughts on the process?

  22. Instructional Programs Question #1: Number of Students Served Since 2001

  23. Considerations • Every program is unique • Different internal and external factors may impact enrollment numbers • Changes in FTEF or # of sections offered • Short-term and late-start classes • Enrollment can be looked at in multiple ways • FTES, WSCH, Enrollment, Headcount • Each approach captures a different element • Efficiency, Interest per student, overall interest

  24. Snapshots of Enrollment Patterns • FTES—Number of Full-Time Equivalent Students. 1 FTES = 525 class (contact) hours of student instruction/activity in credit and non-credit courses. • Enrollment—“Seat Count” showing the number of “warm bodies” filling classrooms. One student may account for multiple enrollments. • Headcount—Unduplicated count of students. Does not consider number of faculty contact hours.

  25. Snapshots of Enrollment Patterns Source: WVMCC PARIS System

  26. Snapshots of Enrollment Patterns Source: WVMCC PARIS System

  27. Snapshots of Enrollment Patterns Source: WVMCC PARIS System

  28. Snapshots of Enrollment Patterns Source: WVMCC PARIS System

  29. One Illustration • Enrollment patterns may not always match up • Fire Protection Technology • FTES: Increase Over 30% • Enrollment: Change Within + or – 10% • Headcount: Decrease Over 10% • Discussion: What might contribute to these differences? • These are the discussions we hope every program will hold

  30. Non-Instructional Services Question #1: Number of Students Served Since 2001

  31. Considerations • Data for Non-Instructional programs is more difficult to capture outside of self-reports • Most programs capture headcount or number of services provided • However, there is no centralized data source • Different measures are more appropriate for different services • As program review continues to evolve, so will the collection and analysis of data

  32. Considerations • Different measures are more appropriate for different services • LATC versus Admissions • Patterns of student service use may not match patterns of enrollment • As program review continues to evolve and grow, so will the collection and analysis of data

  33. Reactions?

  34. Instructional Programs Question #2 Changes in Curriculum Since 2001

  35. Changes in Curriculum Defined As… • Revisions to courses • Development of new courses • Creation of distance learning options • Creation of new • Degrees • Certificates • Graduation competencies • Programs

  36. Accounting Anthropology Art Athletics Biology Business CA Child Development CIS CIT CNET Communication Studies Community Education Counseling DISC English ESL Foreign Language Global Studies Graphic Arts Graphic Design Hospitality Management Humanities Library Manufacturing Mathematics Music Pharmacy Technician Physical Education Political Science Psychology Reading Sociology Workforce Development Programs Reporting Changes and Changes Approved by the BOT Since 2001New Degrees/Certificates/Graduation Requirements

  37. Reactions?

  38. Non-Instructional Services Question #2 Changes in Services Since 2001

  39. Reactions?

  40. Administrative Office Question #1: Nature of Services Since 2001

  41. Considerations • Data for Administration and Governance is more difficult to capture outside of self-reports • Additional review materials, such as surveys and focus groups can provide additional information • As program review continues to evolve, so will the collection and analysis of data

  42. Administrative Office Question #2: Scope of Services Since 2001

  43. Reactions?

  44. Combined Response Question #3 Staffing Changes Since 2001

  45. Funding in Staffing, 2005-2006

  46. Types of Staffing Needs • Fulltime Faculty (not included in most recent prioritization) • Retail Floristry • Work Experience • Classified • Office Support • Division Offices • Part time Faculty Center • Student Services • Career Transfer Center • DISC • Assessment • Health Services (Physician, RN) • Instructional Support • Nursing • Foreign Language • LATC • Science • Students • AV/TV • Instructional Support Labs

  47. Reactions?

  48. Combined Response Question #4 Technology & Other Equipment Needs Since 2001

  49. Technology & Other Equipment Funding Since 2001

  50. Types of Technology & Other Equipment Needs • Smart Classrooms • Instructional Equipment • Computer Upgrades • Instructional • Administrative • Servers • Office Equipment • ADA Equipment: TTYs