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Utilize critical-thinking skills to determine best options/outcomes. 2.05. Define the term creativity. Creative Is . . .

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creative is
Creative Is . . .
  • “Creativity is the act of turning new and imaginative ideas into reality. Creativity involves two processes: thinking, then producing. Innovation is the production or implementation of an idea. If you have ideas, but don’t act on them, you are imaginative but not creative.” — Linda Naiman

Naiman, L. (2010). What is creativity? Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.creativityatwork.com/articlesContent/whatis.htm

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  • “Creativity is the process of bringing something new into being…creativity requires passion and commitment. Out of the creative act is born symbols and myths. It brings to our awareness what was previously hidden and points to new life. The experience is one of heightened consciousness-ecstasy.”—Rollo May, The Courage to Create

Naiman, L. (2010). What is creativity? Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.creativityatwork.com/articlesContent/whatis.htm

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  • “A product is creative when it is (a) novel and (b) appropriate. A novel product is original not predictable. The bigger the concept, and the more the product stimulates further work and ideas, the more the product is creative.”—Sternberg & Lubart, Defying the Crowd

Naiman, L. (2010). What is creativity? Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.creativityatwork.com/articlesContent/whatis.htm

creativity traits
Creativity Traits
  • Curiosity
  • Seeing Problems as Interesting and Acceptable
  • Confronting Challenge
  • Constructive Discontent
  • Optimism
  • Suspending Judgment
  • Seeing Hurdles as leading to improvements and solutions
  • Perseverance
  • Flexible Imagination

Rowse, D. (2007, May 9). 9 Attitudes of highly creative people. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.problogger.net/archives/2007/05/09/9-attitudes-of-highly-creative-people/

demonstrating creativity
Demonstrating Creativity
  • Believe in yourself. Positive self-encouragement works.
  • Use nonlogical thinking. Not everything has to make sense right away.
  • Free your mind! Don’t think of everything in practical form.
  • View problems as challenges that offer the opportunity to innovate.
  • Entertain all ideas. There is no such thing as a frivolous idea.

Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business management (p. 51). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

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  • Relax! Relaxation is a key part of the creative process.
  • Have a playful attitude. Don’t worry about looking foolish.
  • Look at failure as a learning experience that will lead to success.
  • Model creative behavior. Anyone can learn to think creatively.
  • Develop listening skills. You can learn a lot by listening to other people talk about their wants and needs.

Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business management (p. 51). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

developing enhancing creativity
Developing/Enhancing Creativity
  • 1. Commit Yourself to Developing Your Creativity
    • The first step is to fully devote yourself to developing your creative abilities. Do not put off your efforts. Set goals, enlist the help of others and put time aside each day to develop your skills.
  • 2. Become an Expert
    • One of the best ways to develop creativity is to become an expert in that area. By having a rich understanding of the topic, you will be better able to think of novel or innovative solutions to problems.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

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  • 3. Reward Your Curiosity
    • One common roadblock to developing creativity is the sense that curiosity is an indulgence. Rather than reprimanding yourself, reward yourself when you are curious about something. Give yourself the opportunity to explore new topics.
  • 4. Realize that Creativity is Sometimes Its Own Reward
    • While rewarding yourself is important, it is also important to develop intrinsic motivation. Sometimes, the true reward of creativity is the process itself, not the product.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

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  • 5. Be Willing to Take Risks
    • When it comes to building your creative skills, you need to be willing to take risks in order to advance your abilities. While your efforts may not lead to success every time, you will still be boosting your creative talents and building skills that will serve you well in the future.
  • 6. Build Your Confidence
    • Insecurity in your abilities can suppress creativity, which is why it is important to build confidence. Make note of the progress you have made, commend your efforts and always be on the lookout for ways to reward your creativity.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

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  • 7. Make Time for Creativity
    • You won't be able to develop your creative talents if you don't make time for them. Schedule some time each week to concentrate on some type of creative project.
  • 8. Overcome Negative Attitudes that Block Creativity
    • According to a 2006 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, positive moods can increase your ability to think creatively. According to Dr. Adam Anderson, senior author of the study, "If you are doing something that requires you be creative or be in a think tank, you want to be in a place with good mood." Focus on eliminating negative thoughts or self-criticisms that may impair your ability to develop strong creative skills.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

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  • 9. Fight Your Fear of Failure
    • The fear that you might make a mistake or fail in your efforts can paralyze your progress. Whenever you find yourself harboring such feelings, remind yourself that mistakes are simply part of the process. While you may occasionally stumble on your path to creativity, you will eventually reach your goals.
  • 10. Brainstorm to Inspire New Ideas
    • Brainstorming is a common technique in both academic and professional settings, but it can also be a powerful tool for developing your creativity. Start by suspending your judgment and self-criticism, then start writing down related ideas and possible solutions. The goal is to generate as many ideas as possible in a relatively short span of time. Next, focus on clarifying and refining your ideas in order to arrive at the best possible choice.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

slide17
  • 11. Realize That Most Problems Have Multiple Solutions
    • The next time to approach a problem, try looking for a variety of solutions. Instead of simply going with the first idea you have, take the time to think of other possible ways to approach the situation. This simple activity is a great way to build both your problem-solving and creative thinking skills.
  • 12. Keep a Creativity Journal
    • Start keeping a journal to follow your creative process and track the ideas you produce. A journal is a great way to reflect back on what you have accomplished and look for other possible solutions. This journal can be used to save ideas that can later serve as future inspiration.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

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  • 13. Create a Mind Map
    • A mind map is a great way to connect ideas and look for innovative answers to questions. Create a mind map by writing down a central topic or word. Next, link related terms or ideas around the central word. While similar to brainstorming, this technique allows for branching ideas and offers a very visual way of seeing how these ideas are linked.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:MindMapGuidlines.svg

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

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14. Challenge Yourself

    • Once you have developed some basic creative skills, it is important to continually challenge yourself in order to further advance your abilities. Look for more difficult approaches, try out new things and avoid always using the same solutions you have used in the past.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

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15. Try the "Six Hats" Technique

    • The "six hats" technique involves looking at a problem from six differing perspectives. By doing this, you can produce more ideas than you might have had you only looked at the situation from one or two points of view.
      • Red Hat: Look at the situation emotionally. What do your feelings tell you?
      • White Hat: Look at the situation objectively. What are the facts?
      • Yellow Hat: Use a positive perspective. Which elements of the solution will work?
      • Black Hat: Use a negative perspective. Which elements of the solution won’t work?
      • Green Hat: Think creatively. What are some alternative ideas?
      • Blue Hat: Think broadly. What is the best overall solution?

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

slide21
  • 16. Look for Sources of Inspiration
    • Never expect creativity to just happen. Look for new sources of inspiration that will give you fresh ideas and motivate you to generate unique answers to questions. Read a book, visit a museum, listen to your favorite music or engage in a lively debate with a friend. Utilize whatever strategy or technique works best for you.
  • 17. Create Opportunities for Creativity
    • In addition to looking for inspiration, you also need to create your own opportunities for creativity. This might involve tackling a new project or finding new tools to use in your current projects.
  • 18. Consider Alternative Scenarios
    • When approaching a problem, utilize "what if..." questions to consider each possible scenario. If you take a specific approach, what will the outcome be? By looking at these alternatives beforehand, you'll be better able to develop creative solutions to problems.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

slide22
  • 19. Create a Flow Chart
    • When you are developing a new project, start by creating a flow chart to track the presentation of the project from start to finish. Look for various paths or sequences of events that might occur. A flow chart can help you visualize the final product, eliminate potential problems and create unique solutions.
  • 20. Try the Snowball Technique
    • Have you ever noticed how one great idea often leads directly to another? You can take advantage of this by utilizing a "snowball technique" when you are generating ideas for your project. If the idea isn't appropriate for your current work, set it aside to work on later or implement it in a future project.

Cherry, K. (n.d.). How to boost your creativity. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://psychology.about.com/od/cognitivepsychology/tp/how-to-boost-creativity.htm

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  • Look at problems in different ways. Get the group to change their perspective on the problem. Once people “lock into” one way of looking at things the idea flow will slow to a tickle. Have people take a new persona. Ask them to look at the issue from the perspective of another group – accounting, HR, or sales for example. Ask them to think about how their Grandmother or an 8 year old would solve the problem. These are simple ways to force people into a new perspective and the new perspectives will generate more ideas.
  • Make novel combinations. The ideas that land on the flip chart or whiteboard in a brainstorming session are typically considered individually. Have the group look at the initial list and look for ways to combine the ideas into new ones.

Eikenberry, K. (2008, February 21). Eight ways to generate more ideas in a group. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.innovationtools.com/Articles/ArticleDetails.asp?a=300

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  • Force relationships. Once a group is finished with their initial list, provide them with words, pictures or objects. The objects can be random items, the words can come from a randomly generated list or from pictures in magazines or newspapers. When people have their random word, picture or item, have them create connections between the problem and their item. Use questions like, “How could this item solve our problem?” What attributes of this item could help us solve our problem?”
  • Make their thoughts visible. Have people draw! Too often the brainstorming session has everyone sitting except the person capturing the ideas. Let people doodle and draw and you never know what ideas may be spurred.

Eikenberry, K. (2008, February 21). Eight ways to generate more ideas in a group. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.innovationtools.com/Articles/ArticleDetails.asp?a=300

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  • Think in opposites. Rather than asking your direct problem question, ask the opposite. “How could we ensure no one bought this new product?” could be one example. Capturing the ideas on “the opposite,” will illuminate ideas for solving the actual problem.
  • Think metaphorically. This approach is similar to forcing relationships (and is another way to use your words, pictures or items). Pick a random idea/item and ask the group, “How is this item like our problem?” Metaphors can be a very powerful way to create new ideas where none existed before.

Eikenberry, K. (2008, February 21). Eight ways to generate more ideas in a group. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.innovationtools.com/Articles/ArticleDetails.asp?a=300

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  • Prepare. Too often people are asked to brainstorm a problem with no previous thinking time. If people have time to think about a topic, and let their brains work on it for awhile, they will create more and better ideas. Allow people to be better prepared mentally by sharing the challenges you will be brainstorming some time before the meeting whenever possible.
  • Set a Goal. Research shows and my experience definitely confirms that the simple act of giving people a quantity goal before starting the brainstorming session will lead to a longer list of ideas to consider. Set your goal at least a little higher than you think you can get – and higher than this group typically achieves. Set the goal and watch the group reach it!

Eikenberry, K. (2008, February 21). Eight ways to generate more ideas in a group. Retrieved April 12, 2011, from http://www.innovationtools.com/Articles/ArticleDetails.asp?a=300

applying creativity
Applying Creativity
  • Practice brainstorming.
    • When you brainstorm, you think freely to generate ideas. During brainstorming, ideas are not judged as good or bad. Even those that seem silly should be given a fair hearing initially.

Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business management (p. 51). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

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  • Look at ordinary items in new ways.
    • Find a simple item and figure out how many new products or uses you can find for it. With practice, you’ll get better at seeing things in a different light.

Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business management (p. 51). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

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  • Find creative solutions to common problems.
    • When you find yourself perplexed by a problem, think about how to find a solution. Have you ever used a flat-head screwdriver to pry something open? That’s finding a creative solution to a problem.

Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business management (p. 51). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

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  • Connect unrelated items.
    • Ask a friend to put together a tray of different items when Then try to come up with a new product from the items. This forces you to look at things in new ways.

Allen, K.R. & Meyer, E.C. (2006). Entrepreneurship and small business management (p. 51). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

performance activities
Performance Activities
  • Search the Internet for two examples of creativity in business. Record your findings, and discuss them with the class, identifying the impact of the examples on business.
  • Use the Internet, your classmates, and other resources to start thinking about possible venture/product ideas. Generate a list of five or more possibilities, and discuss them with your class. Insert your list into your VIP portfolio.