slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
T ENNESSEE AND THE S ETH C AMPAIGN: PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
T ENNESSEE AND THE S ETH C AMPAIGN:

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 60

T ENNESSEE AND THE S ETH C AMPAIGN: - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 171 Views
  • Updated on

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities presents. T ENNESSEE AND THE S ETH C AMPAIGN:. Implementing Initiatives to Create a More Consumer-Focused, Community-Based Recovery Model.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

T ENNESSEE AND THE S ETH C AMPAIGN:


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities presents TENNESSEE AND THE SETH CAMPAIGN: Implementing Initiatives to Create a More Consumer-Focused, Community-Based Recovery Model 5th Annual Training Institute for State Mental Health Olmstead CoordinatorsSeptember 27, 2005 Marie Williams, LCSW, Executive Director, Division of Recovery Services Gregory Fisher, CMSW, Director, Office of Housing and Homeless Services Lawrence Wilson, LADAC, Consumer Housing Specialist

    2. Marie Williams, LCSW, Executive Director Division of Recovery Services, TDMHDD

    3. RECOVERY SERVICES Marie Williams, LCSWMental Health Executive Director Lisa Ragan Lisa.Ragan@state.tn.us Special Projects Coordinator Melanie HarperMelanie.Harper@state.tn.us Administrative Assistant David ShermanDavid.Sherman@state.tn.us Administrative Assistant • SUPPORT SERVICES • Oversee, implement and coordinate program and current community support services contract activities, including: • Drop-In Centers • Family Support – NAMI • Consumer Support (BRIDGES, etc.) • Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) • Safety Net • Develop, oversee and implement the statewide Creating Support Services Initiative (CSI). • Contact: • Dennis Wenner • Director, Support Services • Dennis.Wenner@state.tn.us • EMPLOYMENT • Oversee, implement and coordinate program and current community employment contract activities, including: • Department of Human Services • Division of Vocational Rehabilitation • Develop, oversee and implement the statewide Creating Jobs Initiative (CJI). • Contact: • Scott Wyatt • Director, Employment • Planning and Development • Scott.Wyatt@state.tn.us • TRANSPORTATION • Oversee, implement and coordinate program and current community transportation contract activities, including: • Drop-In Centers Transportation • Develop, oversee and implement the statewide Creating Transportation Initiative (CTI) • Contact: • Candy Jordan • Transportation CoordinatorLacanas.Jordan@state.tn.us • HOUSING/HOMELESS • Oversee, implement and coordinate program and current community housing contract activities, including: • U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) • Independent Living • Assisted Living • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Housing Within Reach • Creating Homes Initiative (CHI) • Supportive Living for SLFs • Emergency Shelter Grant Program (ESGP) • Targeted Transitional • PATH • Children and Families Homeless Outreach • Oversee the statewide Creating Homes Initiative (CHI). • Contact: • Gregory Fisher • Director, Housing/HomelessGregory.Fisher@state.tn.us • Jane Thompson • Homeless Outreach/PATH CoordinatorJane.Thompson@state.tn.us SEVEN REGIONAL SETH FACILITATORS Region I, Jeanne Price, LCSW Jprice@frontierhealth.org Region II, Sandie Shaver, LCSW; Sshaver@ridgevw.com Region III, Lisa Morris LisaMorris@aimcenterinc.org Region IV, Bob Currie Bob.currie@parkcenternashville.org Region V, Vonda Gray Vonda.gray@centerstone.org Region VI, Rozann Downing Rozann@bhillc.org Region VII, Cheré Bradshaw Chereb@bhillc.org FOUR CONSUMER HOUSING SPECIALISTS Region III, Gina Turley GinaTurley@comcast.net Region IV, Louetta Hixlhix@dualdiagnosis.org Region VI, Wayne Snellingwaynes@bhillc.org Region VII, Lawrence Wilson lwilson@bhillc.org • Division of Recovery Services • incorporates and promotes implementation of the following: • Prevention and intervention strategies • Evidence-based modalities • Best practices • Targeted outcomes and expansion in support services, employment, transportation, and housing

    4. What is Recovery?When is a Person Recovered? • WHEN REVIEWING LITERATURE WRITTEN BY THE LEADERS IN THE FIELD OF RECOVERY: • DR. PAT DEEGAN • MARY ELLEN COPELAND • DR. BILL ANTHONY • AND OTHERS IT IS CLEAR THAT RECOVERY IS A JOURNEY WHOSE DESTINATION INCLUDES…...

    5. ~ The process in which people are able to live, work, learn, and participate fully in their communities. Recovery is the ability to live a fulfilling and productive life despite a disability. ~ [President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health:Report to the President, 2003]

    6. The federal government’s Mental Health Action Agenda states recovery should: Reinforce the message that mental illnesses and emotional disturbances are treatable and that recovery is the expectation. [Transforming Mental Health Care in America. The Federal Action Agenda: First Steps, SAMHSA, July 2005]

    7. Consumers engaged in the process of Reintegration (Recovery) strive to achieve three goals: • They want to restore their relationships; • They want to move toward independent living; and • They want meaningful work. [Reintegration Today: Summer 2004]

    8. Three Essential Elements of a Recovery-Focused Mental Health System: • Treatment: • To Address Impairments • Rehabilitation: • To Overcome Disabilities • Community Supports: • To Sustain Role Recovery

    9. In the Context of Recovery… T he role of the person is expanded beyond that of waiting to be cared for, to that of learning how to take charge of the healing process. People are seen as a whole person instead of a collection of symptoms. They are no longer cases to be managed but rather are the key informant in the quest for recovery… [Adapted from MetaServices, Recovery Ctr.]

    10. Recovery requires a culture shift of creating a “positive culture of healing.” Internal: • Hope / reawakening of hope • Understanding value, purpose, meaning of all lives - reclaiming a positive sense of self • Healing - control, wellness strategies, coping, resilience • Empowerment • Connection! External: • The facilitation of recovery: implementing a positive culture of healing, applying human rights, providing recovery-oriented services

    11. OU RCU R R E N TRE A L I T Y SUPPORT SERVICES ~ For too many Americans with mental illness, the mental health services and supports they need remain fragmented, disconnected and often inadequate, frustrating the opportunity for recovery. ~ [President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health: Report to the President, 2003]

    12. Support Services Update • Continued support of TMHCA and NAMI TN for advocacy and educational activities. • Beginning July 1, 2005, Tennessee’s 49 drop-in centers (3,300 averaged monthly unduplicated ) became peer support centers. This reflects the reality that peer support centers are becoming places for consumers to direct their own recovery process and to find the support in acquiring the necessary skills to utilize resources within the community.

    13. Support Services Update continued • Updated Scope of Services for peer support centers that reflects the change to a more recovery focus. • Guidebook developed in collaboration with TMHCA to standardize how peer support staff conduct their job as well as assisting them to better understand the recovery process. • Wellness Recovery Action Plans (WRAP) to be implemented through the peer support centers.

    14. OU RCU R R E N TRE A L I T Y EMPLOYMENT Research demonstrates that work is a key to recovery and that consumers who are employed are able to live more satisfactory and rewarding lives through this contribution to their communities. Studies show that……. 60% - 75% of the number of people with mental illness want to work. 85% - 95% are unemployed. [Baron, Anthony, Howell, Danley, & Birkel (NAMI), 2003]

    15. Employment Needs and Challenges Work is a part of our lives that has an impact on our definition of self. • WORK: • increases financial security, • builds self-confidence, • improves opportunities for social interaction, and • promotes a sense of hope about the future. Persons measure success and failure and self-worth by the yardstick of their employment.

    16. P ersons with mental illness and co-occurring disorders want to participate in normative activities, and the most important activity is work. EMPLOYMENT PROVIDES: • MONEY • STRUCTURE • A SENSE OF PURPOSE AND IDENTITY • A POSITIVE SELF-IMAGE AS ONE WHO CONTRIBUTES TO THE GOOD OF SOCIETY

    17. When people with mental illness and co-occurring disorders work, they: • become less stigmatized • become less isolated • are less troubled by symptoms • use crisis services less often • experience fewer hospitalizations

    18. TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTHAND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES’ Creating Jobs Initiative The Creating Jobs Initiative (CJI) will build upon targeted, collaborative, grassroots efforts and bring stakeholders and non-traditional representatives to collaborate and set goals for improving and expanding employment services to persons with mental illness and co-occurring disorders, thus increasing employment opportunities for persons with mental illness and co-occurring disorders.

    19. Vision Create and expand employment opportunities for persons with serious mental illness and co-occurring disorders in local communities in Tennessee. Mission Assertively and strategically partner with local communities through education and information sharing in order to increase the number of persons employed who have serious mental illness and co-occurring disorders.

    20. Goal Increase the number of persons employed who have serious mental illness and co-occurring disorders, to be accomplished through an innovative, targeted, grassroots, local community, multi-agency, collaborative aimed at 2,010 persons with mental illness and co-occurring disorders being employed by the year 2010. 2010 by 2010

    21. Employment is an important source of • dignity • purpose • identity For individuals with mental illness and co-occurring disorders, employment can be an important element in R E C O V E R Y .

    22. Creating Jobs Initiative W ill provide focused statewide, strategic and effective community-based task forces solely aimed at expanding and improving employment outcomes for people with mental illness and co-occurring disorders as well as fostering and promoting full recovery and the active and meaningful participation of persons with mental illnesses in all Tennessee communities.

    23. TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTHAND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIESDIVISION OF RECOVERY SERVICES Creating Jobs Initiative We can change the current employment situation for people with mental illness and co-occurring disorders in Tennessee through • intention, • strategy, • collaboration, and • community.

    24. T O G E T H E R we can create 2010 new jobs by 2010!

    25. OU RCU R R E N TRE A L I T Y TRANSPORTATION Accessible transportation is necessary for people with disabilities to go to work, get an education, receive medical care, and to have an active, inclusive role in society. Barriers include: • Lack of available transportation options • Lack of access to existing transportation services [Consumer/Survivor: Mental Health Information, 2003]

    26. OU RCU R R E N TRE A L I T Y HOUSING Housing is, perhaps, the first line of treatment for people with serious mental illness. ~ The lack of decent, safe, affordable, and integrated housing is one of the most significant barriers to full participation in community life for people with serious mental illnesses. ~ [President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health: Report to the President, 2003]

    27. Gregory Fisher, CMSW, Director Office of Housing and Homeless Services, Division of Recovery Services, TDMHDD

    28. Creating Homes Initiative A strategic plan of the Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities to partner with communities to create housing options for people with mental illness and co-occurring disorders in Tennessee.

    29. Creating Homes Initiative: The Vision To create and expand affordable, safe, permanent, and quality housing options for people with mental illness and co-occurring disorders in Tennessee.

    30. Creating Homes Initiative: The Mission To partner with local communities, assertively and strategically, to educate, inform and expand affordable, safe, permanent and quality housing options for people with mental illness and co-occurring disorders.

    31. Creating Homes Initiative: The Milestones • February 2000- Origins • Office of Housing Planning and Development established • Marie Williams named Director • August 2000 - Kicks Off • Announces Creating Homes Initiative (CHI) at TN/KY Housing Institute • September 2000- $2.5 million for Phase One • Nashville • Jackson • Chattanooga • Memphis

    32. Creating Homes Initiative:The Milestones • January - April 2001 - Moves forward • $2 million from Tennessee Housing Development Authority • HUD Section 8 • Statewide group proposal review and rank • Funding announcements • Produces media events • Fights NIMBY/Legal issues A Place to Call Home • www.housingwithinreach.org • click on NIMBY (Not In My Backyard) • click on NIMBY literature

    33. Creating Homes Initiative:The Milestones • April 2001 - Hires Staff, Submits Grants • Hires Regional Housing Facilitators • Applies for new funding with CMS, THDA, HUD Continuum of Care, Section 8 and 811 • October 2001 - Accepts Additional Project • Receives $1.8 million CMS Real Choice Systems Change Grant • October 2001 - Phase II Begins • Nashville • Johnson City • Clarksville • Knoxville • Jackson • Murfreesboro • Memphis • Chattanooga

    34. Seven Regional SETH Facilitators in Seven Mental Health Planning and Policy Council Regions Rozann Downing Bob Currie Jeanne Price Sandie Shaver Cheré Bradshaw Vonda Gray Lisa Morris

    35. Creating Homes Initiative:The Milestones • October 2002 - Successes • Surpasses goal of 2,005 • Announces new goal of 4,010 by 2005 • December 2002 - Receives funding awards • $8 million from Federal Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program • $5 million from HUD Continuum of Care • Continues to work on HUD Collaborative Initiative to End Homelessness

    36. Creating Homes Initiative:The Milestones • July 2004- DMHDD Reorganization • Commissioner Virginia Trotter Betts forms the Division of Recovery Services to coordinate provision of services in areas of Support, Employment/Education, Transportation, and Housing/Homelessness (SETH). • Gregory Fisher named Director of the Office of Housing and Homeless Services • Regional Housing Facilitators become Regional SETH Facilitators • Regional SETH Facilitators continue CHI activities • Initiative doesn’t skip a beat!

    37. Total CHI Units Created (Flexible Housing Options Array Based on Consumers’ Needs) 299 468 70 3,348 103 Total Units Created = 4,288 Total Amount Leveraged = $93,915,891

    38. Creating Homes InitiativeUnits Created and Funding Statewide Total REGION VOUCHER UNITS TOTAL FUNDING I 126 491 617 $19,945,236 II 145 203 348 $ 7,119,892 III 824 329 1153 $17,574,081 IV 642 192 834 $11,956,179 V 25 130 155 $ 6,979,858 VI 89 425 514 $15,187,354 VII 342 325 667 $15,153,291 TOTAL 2193 2095 4288 $93,915,891

    39. Creating Homes InitiativeThe Funding Partners • FHLBank Affordable Housing Program - $15,168,258 • FHLBank American Dream Home Ownership Challenge - $215,000 • FHLBank Welcome Home - $433,500 • HUD Supportive Housing Program - $5,477,299 • HUD Continuum of Care - $1,481,353 • HUD Section 811 - $9,986,600 • HUD Shelter Plus Care - $6,419,112 • HUD Mainstream Vouchers - $2,160,467 • HUD Section 8 Vouchers - $6,635,253 • HUD Fair Share Vouchers - $446,172 • HUD Designated Vouchers - $1,152,249 • HUD Rural Housing and Economic Development - $400,000 • HUD Section 202 - $2,700,000

    40. Creating Homes InitiativeThe Funding Partners • HUD / VA / HHS - $2,200,000 • HUD / Metropolitan Development Housing Authority HOME - $185,000 • HUD American Dream Down-payment Initiative - $8,310 • TN Housing Development Authority (THDA) HOME - $11,604,023 • THDA Low Income Housing Tax Credits - $4,250,000 • THDA Section 8 Vouchers - $10,000 • CHI Leverage - $13,476,919 • City of Memphis - $2,465,000 • Metro Nashville - $100,000 • Plough Foundation - $245,000 • Buffalo Valley Development Corporation - $1,174,000 • Community / Private / Other - $5,522,376

    41. Creating Homes InitiativeThe Funding Partners Approximate total dollars leveraged for housing - $93,915,891

    42. Creating Homes Initiative Current Outcomes • More than $93 million has been leveraged • More than 4,200 new or improved units have been developed • More than 1,155 individuals from local, regional and statewide organizations have participated in making CHI success • 95% statewide decrease in re-hospitalization • Housing Within Reach expanded to all regions

    43. Lawrence Wilson, LADAC Consumer Housing Specialist

    44. Housing Within Reach: The Mission To provide access and real systems change so that individuals with a mental illness or co-occurring disorder can secure resource materials in their effort to achieve the American dream of having a safe, affordable and appropriate place to call home in a welcoming and positive environment. We believe that our mission can best be accomplished through the promotion of consumer independence, enhancement of each person’s dignity and worth, and improvement of quality of life.

    45. Housing Within Reach builds on the success of the Creating Homes Initiative (CHI)

    46. What Was Missing? • Easy access to housing information • Consumer-directed choice • Comprehensive housing education • Research and evaluation • Effective reduction of stigmatization Not Duplication . . . But Dissemination

    47. Two Primary Goals

    48. Goal #1 Design and implement an effective, consumer-directed, accessible housing resource system for Tennesseans with mental illness and co-occurring disorders to increase the number of persons in appropriate, quality, affordable and safe housing.

    49. Goal #2 Effectively reduce the stigma of mental illness statewide, while changing community attitudes and misconceptions regarding community housing for persons with mental illness and co-occurring disorders in an effort to provide a more welcoming environment for persons who reside in Tennessee neighborhoods.

    50. How Do We Get There?