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Healthy Eating and Active Living: the CDC’s Public Health Approach to Preventing and Reducing Obesity PowerPoint Presentation
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Healthy Eating and Active Living: the CDC’s Public Health Approach to Preventing and Reducing Obesity . CDR Heidi Blanck, PhD Chief, Obesity Prevention and Control Branch Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion

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Healthy Eating and Active Living: the CDC’s Public Health Approach to Preventing and Reducing Obesity

CDR Heidi Blanck, PhD

Chief, Obesity Prevention and Control Branch

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)

Healthy Schools June 2011 Aruba PACO

slide2
HHS

Department of Health & Human Services

HHS Healthy Weight Task Force

The findings presented are those of the presenter and not the official views of the CDC.

division of nutrition physical activity and obesity dnpao
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity (DNPAO)

Vision:

A world where regular physical activity, good nutrition, and a healthy weight are a part of everyone’s life

Mission:

Lead strategic public health efforts to prevent and control obesity, chronic disease and other health conditions through physical activity and good nutrition

slide4

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS,2000, 2005, 2009

(*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person)

2005

2000

2009

$147 Billion = Obesity Associated

Health Care Spending, 2008 estimates

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

obesity statistics
More than one in six (17%) U.S. children is obese, three times the rate in the 1970’s (BMI at or above the 95% percentile of the sex-specific BMI-for-age growth charts)

According to 2007-2008 data, disparities exist among youth with higher prevalence among minority racial/ethnic groups including Mexican American boys (27%) and Black girls (29%) aged 12-19 y

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hestat/obesity_child_07_08/obesity_child_07_08.htm

Message: Obesity is Common, Costly, and Serious

Obesity Statistics
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2008

1994

2000

2008

1994

2000

No Data <4.5% 4.5-5.9% 6.0-7.4% 7.5-8.9% >9.0%

No Data <14.0% 14.0-17.9% 18.0-21.9% 22.0-25.9% >26.0%

Age-adjusted Percentage of U.S. Adults Who Were Obese or Who Had Diagnosed Diabetes

Obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2)

Diabetes

CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. National Diabetes Surveillance System available at http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/statistics

slide7

National news teleconference

“Obesity is a major public health problem. We need intensive and ongoing efforts to address obesity or more people will get sick and die from complications of obesity, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer.”

“Not only are the cost of obesity high…, but in addition, the economic cost are high. In 2008 medical dollars, medical cost associated with obesity were estimated at 147 billion.”

“Six things can reduce or prevent obesity.” 1. Physical activity. 2. Increase the uptake and continuation of breast feeding. 3. Increase fruit and vegetable intake. 4. Reduce screen time. 5. Reduce high-calorie food intake, in particular, sugary drinks.

public health approach focus on supportive environments
Public Health Approach: Focus On Supportive Environments

Difficult to make a healthy choice in an unhealthy environment

Working to support families in being able to have healthy choices

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Environment

Making Healthy Choices Easier

Individual

Environment

  • Affordability
  • Access, availability
  • Placement
  • Marketing
  • Culture
  • Skills
  • Knowledge
  • Time
  • Preferences

Healthy eating & physical activity

principal target areas for obesity prevention
Principal Target Areas for Obesity Prevention
  • Increase consumption of fruits and vegetables
  • Increase breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity
  • Increase physical activity
  • Decrease television viewing and screentime
  • Decrease consumption of high energy dense foods of low-nutrient value
  • Decrease consumption of sugar drinks
settings for the prevention childhood obesity
Settings for the Prevention Childhood Obesity
  • Medical /hospitals
  • Worksite - family
  • Community
  • School
  • Child Care
cdc guidance documents policy and environmental strategies for state and communities
CDC Guidance Documents: Policy and Environmental Strategies for State and Communities

Guidance Documents

  • Fruits & Vegetables
  • Energy Density
  • Sugar Sweetened Beverages
  • Breastfeeding
  • Physical Activity
  • Television Viewing
evidence based strategies
Evidence-basedstrategies
  • Promising
  • Emerging
  • Effective
  • Research-tested, Practice-based

www.center-trt.org

  • Reach, impact, sustainability/maintenance
strategies to increase fruit and vegetable access availability and consumption
Strategies to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Access, Availability, and Consumption

Food Policy Coalitions as a Means to Improve the Food Environment

Access to Retail Venues that Sell Fruits and Vegetables in Underserved Communities

Farm-to-Where-You-Are Programs in All Possible Venues

Ready Access to Fruits and Vegetables in Worksite Foodservice, Meetings and Events

Community and Home Gardens

Policies to Incorporate Fruit and Vegetable Activities into Schools and Early learning centers/child care

Include Fruits and Vegetables in Emergency Food Programs

7 strategies reducing sugar drink consumption
7 Strategies: Reducing Sugar Drink Consumption

Ensure ready access to potable drinking water

Limit access to Sugar Drinks

Promote access to and consumption of more healthful alternatives to Sugar Drinks

Limit marketing of Sugar Drinks and minimize marketing’s impact on children

Decrease the relative cost of more healthful beverage alternatives through differential pricing of Sugar Drinks

Include screening and counseling about Sugar Drink consumption as part of routine medical care

Expand the knowledge and skills of medical care providers to conduct nutrition screening and counseling on Sugar Drink consumption

strategy ensure ready access to potable drinking water
Strategy : Ensure ready access to potable drinking water
  • To promote water consumption, potable (clean, good tasting) drinking water should be easily accessible to children and adults in homes and public facilities, including parks, playgrounds, schools, child cares, public buildings, worksites, and clinics
child care based program example

Strategy 1: Ensure ready access to potable drinking water

Child Care-Based Program Example
  • New York City’s Nutritional Standards for Child Care
    • Code requires that potable drinking water be made easily accessible throughout the day, including at meals
    • City code prohibits providing beverages with added sweeteners, whether artificial or natural
    • Limit screentime/television viewing
    • Support breastfeeding, pumping, use of breastmilk

Spring 2011: USDA Guidance for Schools – Compliance Fall 2011, low-fat/reduced fat milk, water during mealtime

school based program examples
School-Based Program Examples

Nutrition standards, meals and snacks

Water access

Food and activity as rewards

Candy, treats, limiting activity

Joint use agreements

Allow community members to take part in physical activity, school gardens, cooking/culinary training, making meals for family as part of aftercare programs

Reduction in advertising on school campus

Strategy: Promote access to and consumption of more healthful alternatives to Sugar Drinks

cdc recommended community strategies and measurements to prevent obesity
CDC Recommended Community Strategies and Measurements to Prevent Obesity

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/community_strategies_guide.pdf

other youth settings
OtherYouthSettings --

National Park Service -

Healthy and sustainablefoodguidelines

Vendorscontracts – canteens, vending machines, stores, restaurants

Waterfountains, refillablewaterstations

Modelforsmall, local parks and open spaces

HealthyParks, HealthyPeople

multi sector multi level actions
Multi-sector, Multi-levelActions
  • Champions and civicengagement
    • What can empoweredyouth do?
    • What can parents do?
    • What can teachers, coaches?
    • What can employers, businessleaders do?
  • Makingpublichealthpolicy, publicpolicy
  • Co-benefits – improvedschoolattendance inprovedacademic, improvedjobs/economy; improved mental health/self-esteem
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Improving healthy eating and activity living is a shared responsibility. Social and environmental changes are influenced by the efforts of many…

u s ftc marketing principles
U.S. FTC Marketing Principles
  • U.S. Interagencyworkgroup, FTC Nutrition Marketing Principles, Voluntary
  • Nutrientstandardsforfoodsmarketedtokids
  • Open commentperiod