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Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt

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Ancient Egypt

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  1. Ancient Egypt

  2. Egyptian Timeline http://www.wsu.edu:8000/~dee/EGYPT/TIMELINE.HTM

  3. Life in Egypt

  4. A Nobleman at Work The British Museum. Egyptian Life. http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/life/home.html

  5. Wall paintings from the tomb of Nebamun, a Theban nobleman (c. 1400 BCE) What do these pictures tell you about his daily life? Fowling The British Museum. Egyptian Life.http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/life/home.html

  6. Measuring Time Symbol for Eternity

  7. At night, the temple priest carefully watched the water clock. As the evening fell, the clock was filled with water. During the night, the water dripped out a hole in the bottom. He checked the water level during the night to determiine when to perform nightly rituals. The Water Clock The British Museum. Egyptian Life. http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/life/home.html

  8. Cartouches: used to measure years via reign of princes

  9. Egyptian Homes Materials: Mud Bricks for Houses The British Museum. Egyptian Life. http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/life/home.html

  10. Decoration from the Palace of Amenhotep III at of Malkata Silverman, David P. 50 Wonders of Tutankhamun. New York: Crown Publishers. 1978.

  11. Models of Ancient Egyptian Houses(second one terracotta, with front courtyard) Three-story townhouse? Handicapped accessibility? The British Museum. Egyptian Life. http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/life/home.html

  12. Painting of Typical Three-Story House of Wealthier Egyptians

  13. A Nobleman’s Estate .http://nefertiti.iwebland.com/timelines/topics/housing.htm

  14. Floor plan of a nobleman's compound, Akhetaten (El Amarna) • adjacent garden and agricultural yards - separated each other by a wall • The estate – • largely self sufficient • run by a steward but supervised by the main wife • including silos and stables, was surrounded by a wall, the entrance guarded by a lodge keeper. • Servants quarters - separated from the main house by a yard. • Workshops, stables, storage rooms and kitchen - near by. • The master's family - in the main house • Harem -women’s quarters (not like Muslim harems) http://nefertiti.iwebland.com/timelines/topics/housing.htm

  15. Gardens Royal Couple in a Garden .http://nefertiti.iwebland.com/timelines/topics/housing.htm

  16. “At Gizeh 4th dynasty apartments have been found consisting of a small vestibule, a main room, and a small niche or inner room which probably served as a bedroom.” Traditional Workers’ Housing Basic 2½ room flat – shotgun style http://nefertiti.iwebland.com/building/deir_el_medine.htm

  17. Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm Carpentry

  18. Tools of Early Dynasty Adse Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm Carpentry

  19. Ancient Egyptian Furniture Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/index.html

  20. structure of a bedframe leg (dynasty uncertain) First Dynasty Bedframe Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm

  21. Wooden Box – Old Kingdom Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm

  22. Table - Middle Kingdom Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm

  23. Stool - New Kingdom Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm

  24. Chair, Eighteenth DynastyThe Louvre, Paris, France Killen, Geoffrey.Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm; http://www.humanities-interactive.org/ancient/tut/768/ex080_03d.jpg

  25. Chair of Sitamum, daughter of Amenhotep III Silverman, David P. 50 Wonders of Tutankhamun. New York: Crown Publishers. 1978.

  26. Shrine Box, King TutenkhamenThe Egyptian Museum, Cairo Detail of lid Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm; http://www.humanities-interactive.org/ancient/tut/768/ex080_03d.jpg

  27. Stool, King TutenkhamenThe Egyptian Museum, Cairo Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm; http://www.humanities-interactive.org/ancient/tut/768/ex080_03d.jpg

  28. Chest on Legs, King TutenkhamenThe Egyptian Museum, Cairo

  29. Golden Thrones of King TutenkhamenThe Egyptian Museum, Cairo Killen, Geoffrey. Cambridge University. http://www.geocities.com/gpkillen/materials.htm; http://www.humanities-interactive.org/ancient/tut/768/ex080_03d.jpg. Silverman, David P. 50 Wonders of Tutankhamun. New York: Crown Publishers. 1978.

  30. Inlaid Chair of King Tutenkhamen Silverman, David P. 50 Wonders of Tutankhamun. New York: Crown Publishers. 1978.

  31. Golden Shrine of King Tutenkhamen Silverman, David P. 50 Wonders of Tutankhamun. New York: Crown Publishers. 1978.

  32. Small Container in the Shape of a Double Cartouche of King Tutenkhamen Silverman, David P. 50 Wonders of Tutankhamun. New York: Crown Publishers. 1978.

  33. Daily Life –Family Structure Nuclear Family: The father was responsible for the economic well-being of the family, and the mother supervised the household and cared for the upbringing of the children. Although Egyptian children had toys, . . . much of their time was spent preparing for adulthood. . . . Peasant children accompanied their parents into the fields; the male offspring of craftsmen often served as apprentices to their fathers. Privileged children sometimes received formal education to become scribes or army officers. Life in Ancient Egypt. http://www.carnegiemuseums.org/cmnh/exhibits/egypt/dailylife.htm

  34. Daily Life - Furnishings(Simple in design) The most common piece of furniture was a low stool, used by all Egyptians including the pharaoh. These stools were made from wood, had leather or woven rush seats, and had three or four legs. Life in Ancient Egypt. http://www.carnegiemuseums.org/cmnh/exhibits/egypt/dailylife.htm

  35. Copies of the few simple furnishings in the common Egyptian home Most kitchens were equipped with a cylindrical, baked clay stove for cooking. Food was stored in wheel-made pottery. The basic cooking equipment was a two-handled pottery saucepan. http://www.virtual-egypt.com/gallery/ gallery.cgi?action=view&link=_ Tours/Karnak&image=karnak_01.jpg&img=&tt=img

  36. Clothing – simple style • Kilts for men • Long, straight dresses for women Methethy (varies slightly from canon of proportions; remarkably well preserved) from Sakkara Late V Dynasty (c. 2420 BCE Polychromed wood31 5/8” high Nelson Gallery of Art Atkins Museum. Handbook. Volume 1.Kansas City. 1973.

  37. Elaborate Costume Jewelry for both Sexes Types: earrings, bracelets, anklets, rings, and beaded necklaces. Components: jewelry many minerals including amethyst, garnet, jasper, onyx, turquoise, and lapis lazuli, as well as copper, gold, and shells; amulets to ward off evil. http://www.virtual-egypt.com/gallery/ gallery.cgi?action=view&link=_ Tours/Karnak&image=karnak_01.jpg&img=&tt=img

  38. Cosmetics Cosmetics Bottle Top • Uses: for appearance and for personal hygiene and health • Many cosmetics found in tombs - vital importance against the hot Egyptian sun and dry winds. • Items: Eye paint, both green and black, is probably the most characteristic of the Egyptian cosmetics. • Sources: green pigment, malachite, made from copper; black paint (kohl) made from lead or soot - was usually kept in a small pot with a flat bottom, wide rim, tiny mouth, and a flat, disk-shaped lid. http://www.virtual-egypt.com/gallery/ gallery.cgi?action=view&link=_ Tours/Karnak&image=karnak_01.jpg&img=&tt=img

  39. Games: Senet - a board game from ancient Egypt Board games were very common in ancient Egypt and people from all levels of society played them. Many game boards from ancient Egypt have been found by archaeologists. However, the rules explaining how to play these games have not survived. By studying game boards and other evidence, experts have made some educated guesses about how these games were played.  The British Museum. Egyptian Life. http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/life/home.html

  40. How to play Senet • Throw the sticks to see how many squares to move your piece forward. • If you throw a one, four, or six, you get an extra turn. • You can't land on one of your own pieces. • If you land on the other player's piece, you switch places with them. However, you can't switch with them if they have two or more pieces in a row. • If the other player has three or more pieces in a row, you can't pass them. • Some squares are ‘safe' squares and some are ‘danger' squares. You will learn what they are as you play. • The first player to get all of their pieces off the board wins the game. • The British Museum. Egyptian Life. http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/life/home.html

  41. TransportationBoat with Cockswain and OarsmenXII Dynasty (c. 2000-1788 BCE)Painted wood 38 ½” long Nelson Gallery of Art Atkins Museum. Handbook. Volume 1.Kansas City. 1973.

  42. De La Croiux, Horst, et al. Gardner’s Art Through The Ages, 9E. New York. Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich. 1991. Artwork • Media: wall murals, furniture, wood and stone statues, painting on papyrus scrolls, pottery painting • Subject Matter: royalty, gods, nature, daily life

  43. “The standard Egyptian relief portrait, as it came to be established during the Old Kingdom, required each part of the body to be presented in strict proportion, with its essential aspect to the viewer (shoulders forward, head turned, legs sideways and striding). An icon of Egyptian art, anatomically impossible, it's also a strangely lifelike arrangement” Canon of Proportions

  44. De La Croiux, Horst, et al. Gardner’s Art Through The Ages, 9E. New York. Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich. 1991. Music and DancingDetail of wall painting from tomb of NebamunThebes, C. 14000 BCEFragment 11 ¾ x 2w7 ¼”British Museum, London

  45. Ancient Egypt en toto was formed during the Early Dynastic period from two basic areas: Upper Egypt and Lower Egypt. http://www.virtual-egypt.com/gallery/ gallery.cgi?action=view&link=_ Tours/Karnak&image=karnak_01.jpg&img=&tt=img

  46. “Upper Egypt was the long, narrow strip of ancient Egypt located south of the Delta. This area is composed of four topographic zones: the Nile River, the floodplain, the low desert, and the high desert. Each of these zones was exploited differently by the ancient Egyptians.” • Lower Egypt was west of the delta and Upper Egypt. http://www.virtual-egypt.com/gallery/ gallery.cgi?action=view&link=_ Tours/Karnak&image=karnak_01.jpg&img=&tt=img

  47. Geography

  48. Geography

  49. Egyptian Religion

  50. “Mythology.” Reprinted from the The World Book Encyclopedia. Field Enterprises Educational Corporation. 1973.