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Fragile States— EMIS, M&E, Approaches to Planning. IIEP Summer Training Paris July 24, 2009 Kurt D. Moses—Vice President & Director, AED. Introduction. The Framework—post-crisis to development Key Factors in Systems Rebuilding Specific Education Management Information Needs A Few Examples

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fragile states emis m e approaches to planning

Fragile States—EMIS, M&E, Approaches to Planning

IIEP Summer Training

Paris July 24, 2009

Kurt D. Moses—Vice President & Director, AED

introduction
Introduction
  • The Framework—post-crisis to development
  • Key Factors in Systems Rebuilding
  • Specific Education Management Information Needs
  • A Few Examples
  • Emerging Options
i post crisis to development
I. Post-Crisis to Development
  • They love their children—all of them.
  • They believe a sound education is a right.
  • They believe that parents can and should contribute
  • They try and take responsibility for their part in education
  • Higher/national/provincial levels have little effect at the local level—but are needed to interact with the biggest sources of funding
i post crisis to development4
Post-Conflict

Still major humanitarian needs—external support

Security limited

Limited communication

Minimal administrative structures

No state structures of any consequence

No personnel, policies, reimbursements, or effective rules

Difficult to create a National Plan

Development

Humanitarian needs begin to be met internally

Better security

Better communication

Early administrative structures (models of structure in place)

Initial state structures

Preliminary, simple guidelines and employed persons

Draft National Plan—often mixed agreement

I. Post-Crisis to Development
ii key factors in systems rebuilding education
II. Key Factors in Systems Rebuilding--Education
  • Establish Identity (without it, no measures of magnitude, no transparency)
    • Schools/Learning Spaces
    • Teachers (linked to schools/learning spaces)
    • Students

2. Resist exclusive focus on government—reach & measure other providers

3. Most issues are experienced locally and sub-nationally, even if discussed nationally

4. Establish acceptable accuracy—start simple, use “successive approximation.”

5. Focus on phasing—start from known to unknown, simple to more complex, proven versus experimental

ii key factors in systems rebuilding education 2
II. Key Factors in Systems Rebuilding—Education (2)

6. Fund planning & measurement—at least 5% of total expenditure & personnel

7. Simplify planning & outcomes focus:

  • Adequacy—sufficient for what is expected
  • Evenness—allocated as evenly as possible
  • Rapidity—monthly/quarterly timeframe, not years
  • Transparency—allow many to see the outcome & the basis

8. Ability to “deliver” will almost always “trump” the promise to do so

funding for emis
Funding for EMIS
  • Too Little Money Overall
  • Too Little Money on Operations
  • Capital Investments too Sporadic
  • Imbalance of Investment—too little to Quality Assurance/ Analysis, too much on Collection
iii specific education management information system needs
III. Specific Education Management Information System Needs
  • Proven approach, simply presented
  • Incorporate modeling of good behavior
    • good definitions
    • clear process
    • good work habits
    • accuracy and care
  • Bring in experience when it is needed
  • Provide simple presentations—simple, not simplistic
  • Provide information at the lowest level—and at the highest—information to the person who can do something with it
  • Fast—address at least one, burning, short-term confusion or issue
iii what emis requires
III. What EMIS Requires
  • Data must be interpreted, & then linked to direction & resources. Without it, mere activity
  • Planning should be phased to reflect:
    • the ability to understand
    • the ability to implement—both policy & delivery
    • the level of available, sufficiently accurate data
    • reasonable time-frame (personal, political, structural—QUESTION: How do you think about 20 years when you were elected for 2?)
what good emis requires

EMIS

What Good EMIS Requires

Practices

People

  • Technology
v emerging options
V. Emerging Options
  • New Techniques:
    • Cell telephone, PDAs, WiFi, WiMax, VSAT, Skype
    • Remote sensing
    • Ubiquitous laptops
  • Profiles targeted to Policy Initiatives
  • Planning Stories—focused & customized for local action
  • Planning “clusters”
  • Don’t forget, every crisis is an opportunity for MAJOR TRANSFORMATION
what emerging options require
What Emerging Options Require
  • Simple
    • Can they be used with minimal instruction
  • Multi-purpose
    • Like a cell phone, are there other reasons for keeping it going
  • Inexpensive
    • Typically, under $50—or, with subsidy, under $200
  • Linked to something important
  • Easily replaced or repaired
big change opportunity to learn
Big Change—Opportunity to Learn
  • School year length (850-1000 hrs.)
  • School open each instructional day & close by (1-3 km.)
  • Teacher is present all school hours
  • Student is present all school hours
  • Student/Teacher ratio workable (aver. 40/1)
  • Instructional materials are available & used (2:1 or 1:1 ratio)
  • Organized classroom & pedagogy—curriculum designed
  • Students reading by 2nd or 3rd grade
kurt d moses vice president director aed

Kurt D. MosesVice President & Director, AED

kmoses@aed.org

+1 202 297 0864

+1 202 884 8275