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Leaders PowerPoint Presentation

Leaders

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Leaders

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  1. Leaders Approaching project design Use of the Logical Framework (Logframe)

  2. Introduction to Planning

  3. Introduction to Planning Planning begins with the assessment Continues to implementation Finishes with evaluation and applying lessons learnt

  4. Planning for Emergencies Learning objectives At the end of this sessions you will be able to-- • Describe the planning cycle • Apply this to tasks in disaster planning • Define a problem • Rank priority of problems identified • Write Goals and Objectives, and select indicators • Consider alternatives and select the best strategy • Construct a logical framework (Logframe) • Use this to plan monitoring and evaluation

  5. Can we plan for emergencies?

  6. Can we plan for emergencies? Chance favors the prepared mind - Louis Pasteur

  7. Planning defined Reinke: The essence of planning consists— • in the analysis of alternatives • in order to achieve goals • in the order of priority.

  8. Planning defined • Winnie the Pooh on Planning Planning: what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it's not all mixed up.

  9. Planning defined • Winnie the Pooh on Planning Planning: what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it's not all mixed up.

  10. Planning keeps you out of trouble

  11. Doing planning • Starts with a goal or vision • Various steps along the way to design for a project • Many of these have special tools to help • Once in place, these steps can help you • Monitor the progress • Evaluate the outcome • These can apply to several areas of disaster planning • Preparedness • Response • Recovery • Mitigation

  12. The Planning Cycle assess identify problems implement set priorities design the project consider strategies

  13. Phases in a disaster The disaster cycle preparedness

  14. Phases in a disaster The disaster cycle preparedness Disaster

  15. Phases in a disaster The disaster cycle preparedness Disaster response

  16. Phases in a disaster The disaster cycle preparedness Disaster rehabilitation response

  17. Phases in a disaster The disaster cycle mitigation preparedness Disaster rehabilitation response

  18. Using the planning cycle for all phases assess implement identify problems design the project set priorities • Different tools at each stage • End up with a project design which we will summarize using a Logical Framework (log frame) • Heart of the planning process • Outline of the tools which are needed consider strategies

  19. Activities for today • We are get some experience with planning methods • We will plan for a vulnerability analysis for the Island of St Joan • In the process we will lean how to use various methods • In the end we will practice using a logical framework

  20. First, something about vulnerability Vulnerability Manageability Risk = Hazard x exposure x

  21. Assessing vulnerability Vulnerability Manageability Risk = Hazard x exposure x Vulnerability analysis

  22. Vulnerability Assessment • This is a survey • Samples all areas • All populations • All services needed in a disaster • Determines who and what are vulnerable for a disaster • Also looks at manageability • What are the resources to respond to a disaster • What coping skills do people have • What do they need • Strengthens preparedness and shows where mitigation is needed • Your job will be to PLAN for this

  23. The Planning Cycle assess identify problems implement set priorities design the project consider strategies

  24. The Planning Cycle State the need; what is the purpose of this activity? assess identify problems implement set priorities design the project consider strategies

  25. The Planning Cycle assess identify problems implement set priorities design the project consider strategies

  26. The Planning Cycle assess Identify each problem and write a problem statement identify problems take action set priorities design the project consider strategies

  27. The Planning Cycle assess Identify each problem and write a problem statement identify problems take action set priorities design the project • Tools: • Problem tree or • Fishbone diagram consider strategies

  28. Problem identification • Starts with the observation and looks for root causes

  29. Problem identification • Starts with the observation and looks for root causes The problem tree Car won’t start

  30. Problem identification • Starts with the observation and looks for root causes The problem tree Car won’t start Electrical problem Fuel problem

  31. Problem identification • Starts with the observation and looks for root causes The problem tree Car won’t start Electrical problem Fuel problem Battery flat Wire loose No petrol Fuel line blocked

  32. Problem identification • Starts with the observation and looks for root causes The problem tree Car won’t start Electrical problem Fuel problem Battery flat Wire loose No petrol Fuel line blocked

  33. Problem identification WHY? • Starts with the observation and looks for root causes The problem tree Car won’t start Electrical problem Fuel problem Battery flat Wire loose No petrol Fuel line blocked

  34. Problem identification WHY? • Starts with the observation and looks for root causes The problem tree WHY? Car won’t start WHY? Electrical problem Fuel problem Battery flat Wire loose No petrol Fuel line blocked

  35. Problem identification WHY? • Starts with the observation and looks for root causes The problem tree WHY? Car won’t start WHY? Electrical problem Fuel problem Battery flat Wire loose No petrol Fuel line blocked WHY? WHY? WHY? WHY?

  36. Cause and Effect diagrams • Fishbone or Ishakawa diagrams • Organized brainstorming about a problem • Pictorial display of ideas • Possible causes of a problem--or possible solutions • Helps avoid missing important ideas • Helps in defining the problem • Often leads to extensive discussions • May identify need for further analysis to confirm actual causes—points out areas where data needed

  37. The Fishbone or Ishikawa diagram

  38. The Fishbone or Ishikawa diagram Could select various categories

  39. political The Fishbone or Ishikawa diagram Economic attitudes

  40. political The Fishbone or Ishikawa diagram Economic attitudes Government structure

  41. political The Fishbone or Ishikawa diagram Economic attitudes Government structure cultural

  42. political The Fishbone or Ishikawa diagram Economic attitudes community structure Government structure cultural

  43. The Fishbone or Ishikawa diagram Add more bones if needed Add more bones if needed

  44. Then add in major causes

  45. Then the minor ones

  46. Set the priorities

  47. Getting to work on planning the analysis • Finishes with a problem statement