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Introduction to Marzano’s Art and Science of Teaching
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Introduction to Marzano’s Art and Science of Teaching

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  1. Introduction to Marzano’sArt and Science of Teaching Sherwood Brooks Sharon Klink Driftwood Middle School 2011

  2. Overview of Today’s Training • Explain this observation instrument and how it aids in instructional improvement • Review and practice using Marzano’s Art and Science of Teaching Framework (Domain 1) • Develop accuracy using tools to document evidence of practice and provide feedback to teachers

  3. Doing Teacher Evaluation Differently What is the goal?

  4. The Goal:An expectation that all teachers can increase their expertise from year to year which produces gains in student achievement from year to year with a powerful cumulative effect

  5. Art and Science of Teaching Framework Based Upon Decades of Research

  6. Research-based strategies have a high probability of raising student achievement ifthey are used: • In the part (segment) or type of lesson that is appropriate for the strategy • At the appropriate level of implementation

  7. Teacher Effectiveness:The Research Behind the Model

  8. Five Conditions to Support Teacher Expertise

  9. Causal Links to Student Achievement Common Language of Instruction Domain One Domain Two Domain Three Domain Four

  10. Levels of Performance • Scales: continuum of teaching behavior that documents growth over time and can be used as a formative feedback tool or a summative assessment. Example from Domain 1: Processing New Information

  11. What does high quality instruction look like? • Talk with a partner and write down as many factors as possible.

  12. One of the greatest barriers to school improvement is the lack of an agreed upon definition of what high quality instruction looks like. - Elmore (2010) What are the potential implications for student achievement?

  13. Design Questions • What will I do to establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and celebrate success? 6. What will I do to engage students? • What will I do to establish and maintain classroom rules and procedures? • What will I do to help students effectively interact with new knowledge? • What will I do to help students practice and deepen understanding of new knowledge? • What will I do to help students generate and test hypotheses about new knowledge? • What will I do to recognize adherence and lack of adherence to classroom rules and procedures? • What will I do to establish and maintain effective relationships with students? • What will I do to communicate high expectations for all students?

  14. The Marzano Framework organizes 9 of 10 Design Questions into Three Lesson Segments:

  15. The Marzano Art and Science of Teaching Framework 4 Domains 10 Design Questions (9 Observable Teaching Behaviors) 3 Lesson Segments 41 Categories of Instructional Strategies (Elements)

  16. Design Question 1: Establishing and communicating learning goals, tracking progress, celebrating success

  17. What the Research says about Design Question #1 (setting goals, monitoring progress, celebrating success)

  18. Design Question 3: What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge? Knowledge can be categorized as Procedural or Declarative.

  19. Procedural and Declarative Knowledge

  20. Setting Learning Goals When creating learning goals, it is most useful to state them in one of the following two formats: (Same as SMART Objectives) • Students will be able to __________________. • Students will understand _________________. The reason for this is that content knowledge can be organized into two broad categories: Declarative knowledge & Procedural knowledge.

  21. Learning Goals, Activities and Assignments

  22. Learning Goals-Activities and Assignments: Example

  23. Using Scales to Track Student Progress Scales: A Continuum of Teaching Behavior Leading to Expertise

  24. Scales and the Use of Feedback

  25. A Scale or Rubric Helps Students Learn • Encourages continuous learning • Provides specific and focused feedback specific to a criterion • Students can effectively provide their own feedback and measure their own progress over time • Allows for accurate peer feedback

  26. Building an Effective Scale/Rubric

  27. Design Question #1: What will I do to establish and communicate learning goals, track student achievement, and celebrate success?

  28. Classroom Rules and Procedures • General classroom behavior • Beginning the day or period • Ending of the day or period • Transitions and interruptions • Materials and equipment • Group work • Seat work

  29. Organizing Physical Space

  30. Processing the Learning: Lesson Segment Involving Routine Events Read protocol Number 4. While you watch the following video, look for teacher evidence of establishing routines and student evidence of understanding and following routine expectations

  31. Design Question 2: What will I do to help students effectively interact with the new knowledge?

  32. Teach the Thinking • Small chunks of content need to be processed during a critical input experience • Active processing requires the use of macro-strategies, or interacting instructional strategies • Students cannot intuit these strategies they must be taught

  33. Common Components of Macro-strategies • Summarizing and Note Taking • Nonlinguistic Representation • Questions • Reflection • Cooperative Learning

  34. Identifying Critical Input Experiences Using a Variety of Mediums • A unit with two learning goals might have four to six critical input experiences. • Adequate time must be given to ensure students process the content deeply and comprehensively. • Examples: • Read a specific passage of text. • Watch a video. • Listen to a mini-lecture. • Watch a demonstration. • Participate in a simulation.

  35. Previewing New Content • Help students activate prior knowledge relative to the new information • Activating this knowledge or related knowledge helps students create linkages

  36. Organize Students to Interact with New Knowledge Benefits • Provides students with multiple reference points • Facilitates active processing of information during a critical input experience • Challenges students to articulate their thinking • Allows students to see how others process information • Allows students to react to how others process information • Groups of two to five • Establish operating rules in advance

  37. Present New Information in Small Chunks “Learning proceeds more efficiently if students receive information in small chunks that are processed immediately. The more students know about the content, the larger the chunks can be.” Robert Marzano The Art and Science of Teaching (2007)

  38. Using Descriptions, Discussions and Predictions to Enhance Understanding • After each small chunk of information provided students should work in small groups to describe, discuss, and make predictions regarding new information.

  39. Elaborating on New Content Elaborative questions can be organized into two broad categories: Inferential Questions and Elaborative Interrogations The Art and Science of Teaching (2007)

  40. Recording and Representing Knowledge • Notes • Academic Notebooks • Graphic Organizers • Dramatic Enactments • Mnemonics

  41. Reflecting on Learning • Final step to actively processing information • Importance of questions as a catalyst for success • Sample Questions: • What was I right about? • What was I wrong about? • How confident am I about what I have learned? • What did I do well during the experience and what could I have done better? • All learners benefit from self monitoring, self regulating, and examining understanding • Students can assess their own progress • Sample Questions: • How am I doing? • What do I understand better now? • What am I still confused about? • How could I have completed this task differently?

  42. 3 Ways to Stimulate Student Reflection • Reflective Questions and Journals • Think Logs • Exit Slips

  43. Design Question 2: What will I do to help students effectively interact with the new knowledge?

  44. Research and Theory • Schema Development • Development of Procedural Knowledge • Development of Declarative Knowledge • Homework

  45. Design Question 3: What will I do to help students practice and deepen their understanding of new knowledge?