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Telling a Story with Pictures: Choosing What to Show. Dr. Harry Witchel Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Story Boards. A story board is a way of roughly drawing out on a piece of paper what is going on in the movie

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telling a story with pictures choosing what to show

Telling a Story with Pictures:Choosing What to Show

Dr. Harry Witchel

Brighton and Sussex Medical School

story boards
Story Boards
  • A story board is a way of roughly drawing out on a piece of paper what is going on in the movie
    • In this course, story boards can be drawn by hand, the lines can be sloppy, and you can use symbols and stick figures to represent the objects on screen
  • In a story board, there are frames (you can draw 6-8 frames on a page of A4).
    • In each frame you show what the viewer sees
    • You can illustrate actions occurring by using arrows
    • You can put what the characters say in a text box below the picture
shot selection
Shot Selection
  • In a movie, you need to explain the context of what is happening, and you need to focus the viewer on what is important
  • You do this by carefully selecting a series of “shots” and then defining regions of interest
  • These rules are essential in didactic movies, but they are also important in Hollywood movies
shot selection1
Shot selection
  • Extreme wide shot
    • Very far away: character is invisible or barely visible
    • Gives Location
  • Long shot
    • Size: Far away, character takes up ¼ of total height of frame
    • Relationship in space between characters/objects and environment
      • Character doing something TO the environment
      • Character “owns” environment
  • Full shot
    • Size: full body(s) with space above and below character, character takes up ½ of total height of frame
    • Relationship in space (and emotions) between characters/objects
shot selection2
Shot selection
  • Medium shot
    • Size: half to ¾ of body fills up frame, or there are 2 heads
    • Relationship in space (and emotions) between characters/objects
    • Environment is not relevant (or is already explained)
    • Demonstrates process occurring
    • Most common shot, useful for most of story
  • Close up
    • Size: Head & shoulders – most of body is cut out of shot
    • Register of emotion
    • Intimate
  • Extreme close up
    • Size: part of a body – mouth, eyes, hand
    • Provides information OR
    • Can be intimate
regions of interest rois
Regions of Interest (ROIs)
  • In didactic movies, it is essential that the user knows where to look
    • If not, they will have no idea what is going on
  • There should not be too many things happening at once
  • Usually only one new action can be followed
    • You can include one other familiar action as the “clock”
  • If you put more than one action in a slide, the user will be unable to follow much (if any) of it
    • You can make a series of stopped action shots where the user advances the action (but then why not use photos rather than a movie)
    • You can break up the sequence so that only one action occurs (ie show the same series of events three times, but have the focus on only one action/aspect during each run through)
regions of interest rois1
Regions of Interest (ROIs)
  • Speed
  • Starting and stopping
  • Circling, arrows
  • Contrast and focus
    • Mix circling with contrast lowered outside circle
  • Zoom
  • User interactivity
contrasting colours
Contrasting Colours
  • Contrasting colours are essential for visibility, especially with lettering
  • For two colours to really contrast, one must be dark and the other must be light
    • Contrasting hue (eg red on green) is much less visible than differences in brightness
      • Examples of good combinations:
      • Black lettering on white (& make the lettering bold)
        • Usually a good combination will work both ways (eg White lettering on black)
      • Yellow on dark blue (eg blue gradient), and vice versa
  • Beware of mid-tones, especially Red!
    • If you must use red, put it against a white
  • For complex backgrounds (photos with dark & light), pick 1:
    • Use lettering with outlines (black letters with white outlines)
    • Add a partially transparent square of dark colour where your lettering will be
    • Make the entire background less contrasty and lighten/darken it
white is a good colour for contrasts
White Is a Good Colour for Contrasts
  • White contrasts with most other colours
    • White on pillar box red works well
    • White works well against most mid-tones
  • White does not work against
    • Any background that has white in it
    • Light yellows
slide10

Reduced contrast

and brightness

of photo

Writing with outline

Writing w/o outline

Writing w/o outline

Writing w/o outline

slide11

Please do NOT make mistakes with colour contrasts and lettering – this is an essential part of the course learning material

Red

White

Contrasts are best with differing brightnesses.

Red on green (colour/hue opposites) is disappointing because both are mid-tones

lowering the contrast in flash
Lowering the Contrast in Flash
  • In Flash you can quickly lower the contrast of the background by overlaying a white object with partial transparency over the unimportant objects
    • Partial transparency is achieved by changing the alpha
    • Only use white if that this the colour of the background. Use the colour of the background to make objects less contrasty
  • You can make objects grey
  • You can tint objects with white