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  1. Cartoon group - Cartoonists and the Royal Family, 1953-2003 • This group of cartoons shows the changing representation of Queen Elizabeth II and the Royal family, in the fifty years after her coronation in 1953.During the first decade of the Queen’s reign, newspaper cartoonists maintained the deference and respect that had been shown to British royalty since the late nineteenth century. Readers would protest if her face was shown in a newspaper cartoon, and Stanley Franklin, who became the Daily Mirror political cartoonist in 1959, acknowledged that “in my first few years on the Mirror you drew only the back view of the Queen.” There were, however, no reservations about drawing her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, and he came to feature in many cartoons.Contemporaries looked in amazement at the way Royalty had been caricatured a hundred and fifty years earlier, and believed that the difference arose from the character of the present Queen and her family. “The art of impaling Royalty with a political cartoon is lost today,” wrote the journalist Tom Cullen in 1969, “possibly because present-day Royalty lead such exemplary lives that there is nothing visible into which the cartoonist can sink his harpoon.”A major catalyst for change was the Queen herself, who followed her Press Secretary’s advice and allowed the BBC to film her private life. The resulting two-hour documentary “The Royal Family” was shown in 1969, and was watched by a vast audience of 31 million. For cartoonists the Queen and her family were now fair game, and their deference quickly disappeared. Within twenty years they were treating the Queen as just another public figure whose life was open to comment and ridicule. • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  2. Record code: 01074 • This cartoon of Prince Philip, drawn by the sixty-two year old caricaturist Ralph Sallon, was drawn during his visit to Canada. It demonstrates the popularity of the Prince at this date, and his usefulness for cartoonists wanting to depict Royalty. • Prince Philip - Top of the Royal Pops • Ralph Sallon : Daily Mirror(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  3. Record code: MW0843 • This cartoon, by John Musgrave-Wood ("Emmwood") is characteristic of depictions of the Queen in the first decade of her reign. Shown on a Royal tour of India, Emmwood has chosen to draw her from the back and in silhouette, despite the fact that photographs of the Queen on the same elephant ride appeared in the "Daily Mail." • No caption • Emmwood [John Musgrave-Wood] : Daily Mail(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  4. Record code: JL5081 • This cartoon, by the fifty-two year old cartoonist Joe Lee, underlines the fact that the Queen's coronation, on 2 June 1953, was a major television event. The Queen began her reign in a highly visible manner, and on a wave of popularity. A cartoon by David Low in the Manchester Guardian [LSE4519], criticising the cost of the Coronation festivities, was attacked as "a new low in sheer bad taste". • London Laughs: Crowded Programme. "Well, that's about the lot. We've seen the Coronation, Spithead, ... • Joseph Lee : Evening Standard(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  5. Record code: MC1015 • Another favourite trick used by cartoonists reluctant to draw the Queen was to hide her behind her husband, Prince Philip. In this cartoon Michael Cummings of the "Daily Express" has drawn an actual event in the Queen's visit to Ghana, without showing much more than her hat and the back of her skirt. • "When did you last see your father?" • Michael Cummings : Daily Express(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  6. Record code: 02502 • This cartoon by Wally Fawkes ("Trog") shows another common trick used by cartoonists in the 1950s when depicting the Queen. She was often drawn from behind, almost completely hidden behind the throne, although there was no such reticence about drawing Prince Philip. • No caption • Trog [Wally Fawkes] : New Statesman(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  7. Record code: 07137 • Another cartoon by Wally Fawkes, still deferential in drawing the Queen from the back, but starting to break the taboos by treating her very informally. • "I can forgive them everything, Philip, except these long nights at the opera. • Trog [Wally Fawkes] : Observer(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  8. Record code: 08798 • Another deferential drawing of the Queen from behind, this time by the fifty-two year old JON (William John Philpin Jones) in the Daily Mail. The Queen is shown opening Parliament, and the joke refers to an attack on Parliament published in the same paper the previous day, by the commentator Bernard Levin. • "This House of decay, incompetence... sorry, that's Bernard Levin's speech." • Jon [William John Philpin Jones] : Daily Mail(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  9. Record code: 13069 • The changing attitude of cartoonists to the Royal Family was partly response to the greater willingness of its members to appear in the media. By 1967 Prince Philip in particular was willing to make controversial public statements, and frequently appeared in the newspapers and on television. Wally Fawkes suggests that the Prince is becoming better known as a public figure than a member of the Royal Family. • I know where I seen 'im before - on the telly weren't it? • Trog [Wally Fawkes] : Observer(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  10. Record code: GA2522 • Another cartoon, this time by Carl Giles of the Daily Express, combines a very informal representation of the Queen and Prince Philip on a tube train, with the careful deference of showing them from the back. • Published caption: "Of course, if you will go lending the coach to any Tom, Dick or Harry, dear..... • Giles; Ronald Carl (1916-1995) : Daily Express(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  11. Record code: 15676 • The entry of the Royal Family into the media was at first carefully managed. The Investiture of Prince Charles as Prince of Wales in July 1969 was the subject of a documentary called "A Prince for Wales", in which he was interviewed by David Frost. Stanley Franklin of the Daily Mirror suggests that the interview was likely to be rather sycophantic. • Prince Charles interviewed by David Frost / By appointment • Stanley Franklin : Daily Mirror(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  12. Record code: 16258 • Wally Fawkes' informal depiction of the Queen and Prince Philip was published after Prince Charles appeared as a dustman in a student review at the University of Cambridge, and Princess Anne drove a bus when opening a transport training centre. Fawkes later recalled that even these gentle cartoons of the Queen would attract complaints from readers. • 'I suppose we DID send them to the right schools' • Trog [Wally Fawkes] : Daily Mail(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  13. Record code: 16629 • When this cartoon by Leslie Illingworth appeared in the Daily Mail, the Queen had just admitted that she was living beyond her Civil List allowance, and was using her private income to subsidise public functions. In a television interview, broadcast the previous day, Prince Philip even suggested that “we may have to move into smaller premises”. This cartoon shows the Queen - still drawn from the back - attending the Royal Variety Performance at the London Palladium that night, with Prince Philip saying "At least it's free." • 'At least it's free' • Illingworth, Leslie Gilbert, 1902-1979 : Daily Mail(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  14. Record code: 11534 • In 1969 the Queen appeared in a phenomenally-successful television documentary entitled "The Royal Family", which was viewed by 31 million people. In June 1970 it was announced that the Queen's Christmas address to the nation was to be equally informal, offering a "candid camera" view of the Royal Family. Bernard Cookson's cartoon is a gentle response to this new accessibility on the part of the Royal Family, but later cartoonists would use it as justification for abandoning all traditional deference. • "We could open up with you showing the viewers your polo bruises!" • Bernard Cookson : Evening Standard(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  15. Record code: 21564 • Another Emmwood cartoon, showing the Queen in her dressing-gown discussing the recent increase in her Civil List allowance from the government. No longer hidden or drawn from behind, this cartoon reflects the Queen's new image of accessibility.  • "Good! Now at least we'll be able to afford a turkey for Christmas!" • Emmwood [John Musgrave-Wood] : Daily Mail(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  16. Record code: 21695 • The greater openness of the Royal Family brought a greater freedom to criticise. Journalists asked if they offered value for money, and in December 1971 the Chancellor of the Exchequer indicated the Labour government's willingness to tax the Queen's private income. JAK - Raymond Jackson - imagined the Queen's surprise at receiving her first tax demand (they came in envelopes maked "OHMS", to show they were from civil servants working "On Her Majesty's Service").   • "Philip, what does O.H.M.S. mean?" • Jak [Raymond Jackson] : Evening Standard(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  17. Record code: 21886 • In January 1972 a new official portrait of the Queen was unveiled. Painted by an American named Joseph Wallace King, he explained that it showed her without royal regalia, "as a woman; feminine, petite, charming". Painted for exhibition in the United States, JAK's cartoon wonders how far this type of representation can go. • "I suppose it's only a question of time before that damn Yankee magazine tries to get her for Playma... • Jak [Raymond Jackson] : Evening Standard(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  18. Record code: 25645 • At the time of this cartoon Edward Heath's Conservative government faced considerable problems from high inflation and trades union unrest. In December 1973 action by the coal miners brought the "Three-Day Week", in which the government limited commercial electricity consumption to three consecutive days each week. There were suggestions that a General Election should be fought on the question of "Who rules Britain, the unions or the government?" The Queen had no constitutional role to play, but Cookson imagines her annoyance at being left out of the question. • No caption • Bernard Cookson : Evening Standard(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  19. Record code: 26314 • In 1973 a Northern Ireland Assembly was established, and Michael Cummings' imagines the Queen being obliged to accept further reductions of her power, as the Labour government introduces devolution for Wales, Scotland, and Cornwall. Cummings, who was notoriously opposed to coloured immigration, also adds the "Sikh Republic of Southall" in London. • "Mr. Wilson! Now that, after all, we had to withdraw from Ulster - then Scotland, then Wales, then C... • Michael Cummings : Daily Express(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  20. Record code: 40047 • 'No, no, no! More emphasis on the vowels, Diana. Now try again, "My husband and I..."' • Mac [Stan McMurtry] : Daily Mail(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  21. Record code: 40067 • No caption • Peter Fluck : Labour Weekly(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  22. Record code: 40117 • "I think you're right, Diana. It's getting a bit chilly" • Charles Griffin : The People(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  23. Record code: 36557 • "Just remind her whose balcony this is, Andrew" • Bernard Cookson : The Sun(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  24. Record code: KL0485 • No caption • Kal [Kevin Kallaugher] : Today(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  25. Record code: 40159 • "This carrot loved your speech last night, Your Highness!" • Stanley Franklin : The Sun(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  26. Record code: 40168 • "Charles? Charles? ... Charles who?" • Bernard Cookson : The Sun(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  27. Record code: 40180 • "Oi! Diana. I want a word with you." • Charles Griffin : Daily Mirror(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  28. Record code: 40185 • "The usual press rubbish about a royal rift, your highness!" • Stanley Franklin : The Sun(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  29. Record code: PC3220 • "It's Tuesday! Your nights are Monday, Wednesday and Friday." • Charles Griffin : Daily Mirror(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  30. Record code: 45673 • No caption • Trog [Wally Fawkes] : Observer(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  31. Record code: PC3224 • No caption • Charles Griffin : Daily Mirror(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  32. Record code: PC3225 • No caption • Martin Rowson : The Guardian(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  33. Record code: SBD0001 • No caption • Steve Bell : The Guardian(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  34. Record code: PC0698 • "No need to worry, Sophie, it's just a formality: You know what lawyers are like." • Charles Griffin : Daily Express(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  35. Record code: SBD0024 • No caption • Steve Bell : The Guardian(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  36. Record code: PC0785 • No caption • Chris Riddell : The Observer(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  37. Record code: PC1883 • "I, Lizzie, wish to outline the plans of Tone and his mates for the next Parliament...!" • Colin Whittock : Birmingham Evening Mail(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  38. Record code: PC3896 • No caption • Paul Thomas : Daily Express(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  39. Record code: PC2483 • No caption • Peter Schrank : The Independent(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  40. Record code: PC4647 • "My next guest is Andrew, whose incredibly rich mother refuses to help his beautiful but impoverishe... • Mac [Stan McMurtry] : Daily Mail(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  41. Record code: PC5308 • No caption • Paul Thomas : Daily Express(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  42. Record code: PC5412 • "Philip stop teasing the boy!" • Tom Johnston : Daily Mirror(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  43. Record code: PC6063 • No caption • Dave Gaskill : The Sun(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  44. Record code: 64713 • No caption • Dave Gaskill : The Sun(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  45. Record code: DB0360 • No caption • Dave Brown : The Independent(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  46. Record code: 53322 • "If he want to hear right-wing views, it's easier to pop round to his Dad's' • Jonathan Pugh : The Times(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  47. Record code: 60123 • No caption • Paul Thomas : Daily Express(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  48. Record code: 61574 • No caption • Steve Bell : The Guardian(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  49. Record code: 61433 • No caption • Dix [Andrew Dixon] : The Guardian(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk

  50. Record code: 61820 • No caption • Dave Brown : The Independent(c) The British Cartoon Archive • This document was created at The British Cartoon Archive - http://www.cartoons.ac.uk