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The Jay and the Peacock. Traditional Version Illustrated by Shalini Marti (Spring 1999) . http://www.umass.edu/aesop/jay/index.html. 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. The Jay and the Peacock. Modern Version Illustrated and retold by Shalini Marti (Spring 1999) .

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The Jay and the Peacock


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the jay and the peacock

The Jay and the Peacock

Traditional Version

Illustrated by Shalini Marti (Spring 1999)

http://www.umass.edu/aesop/jay/index.html

slide2

1

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4

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the jay and the peacock5

The Jay and the Peacock

Modern Version

Illustrated and retold by Shalini Marti (Spring 1999)

http://www.umass.edu/aesop/jay/index.html

slide6

1

2

3

4

slide7

1

2

3

4

slide8

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3

biography of aesop
Biography of Aesop
  • Born in 620 B.C., died in 564 B.C.
  • Deformed in body

Accomplished in mind

  • A slave who gained freedom by his wit
  • Lived at the court of Croesus, King of Lydia
  • Be sent to a journey to Delphi
  • Met with a violent death
characteristics of aesop s fables
Characteristics of Aesop’s Fables
  • Short stories
  • Fictitious characters (usu. animals)
    • Universal popular consent
  • No skilful introduction of characters and setting
  • Convey a hidden meaning (moral lesson)
    • Written in the end of the story
  • Aim at improvement of human conduct
universal popular consent
Fox

Cunning and tricky

Hare (rabbit)

Timid

Lion

Bold and arrogant

Wolf

Cruel

Horse

Proud

Ass (donkey)

Patient

Universal Popular Consent
moral lesson of the story
Moral Lesson of the Story
  • It is not only fine feathers that make fine birds.
    • Good virtue does not depend on good-looking.
    • External appearance does not mean internal goodness.
    • Don’t judge people by

their appearances.