Schooling Differences Between Black and White Children before and after the Civil War - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Schooling Differences Between Black and White Children before and after the Civil War

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  1. Schooling Differences Between Black and White Children before and after the Civil War By Jolyn Davis and Heather Kurtz

  2. . Thought Question… How was schooling different between black children and white wealthy children in the late 1800’s? These children are two of the Waller children who lived in the Poplar Hill Mansion in Salisbury, Maryland in the late 1800’s

  3. The top picture is a picture of the Poplar Hill Mansion in Salisbury, MD. Wealthy white children learned in the home before the Civil War. The bottom picture is a one room school house, where newly freed African-American children would have learned after the Civil War.

  4. Schooling for black children BEFORE the Civil War Did you know that before the Civil War, education for black children did not exist? In fact, it was against the law for African-Americans to read and write! Sometimes, slaves would teach themselves to read and write at night after a long day of slave labor.

  5. Schooling for white wealthy children BEFORE the Civil War Before the Civil War, wealthy white children were taught in their home by a slave woman Keep in mind that it was illegal for slaves to learn to read and write. They could only teach numbers, letters and colors

  6. This is an actual picture of a slave woman taken at the Poplar Hill Mansion in Salisbury, Maryland before 1886. She would have taught the children their lessons in the nursery until they were eight years old. Although slaves were not allowed to read and write, her slave master taught her what she needed to know in order for her to teach the children of the house.

  7. AFTER the Civil War

  8. The Waller family lived in the Poplar Hill Mansion in Salisbury, MD from 1882-1945 8 children : Jonathan, James, George W.D., Richard, Martha, Adeline, Julia and Rachel All received the best education possible Poplar Hill Mansion: the wealthy white family

  9. After the Civil War, white wealthy children would leave their nurseries and go into the schools to learn, with plenty of books and materials provided for their learning. Poplar Hill Mansion Continued

  10. African American education after the Civil War After the Civil War, schools were not established for African American children in the same way they were for white children. African American children learned in whatever setting they could find, using whatever materials they could find. In lots of cases, churches would be used as meeting places during the week for students to learn.

  11. Chipman Cultural Center After the Civil War, slaves were freed from the Poplar Hill Mansion. Those freed slaves started the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the current site of the Chipman Cultural Center

  12. First African-American School on the Eastern Shore The church was not being used during the week, so freed blacks saw this space as an opportunity to educate themselves. This church also became the first public school for African-American children on the Eastern Shore

  13. This is the room in the Chipman Cultural Center where the freed slaves would get their education. Today, it is used for meetings and events.

  14. Together as a class compare and contrast schooling now, schooling for black children after the Civil War, and schooling for white children after the Civil War

  15. Use a Venn diagram to sort yourinformation Whites after civil war Now Blacks after the civil war