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Responsibilities of Den leaders w/ ideas. By Del and Brenda Schlosser. We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future. Franklin D. Roosevelt :. What Makes Cub Scouts Work?. Leaders Parents Role Models. The Four T’s of Scouting.

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responsibilities of den leaders w ideas

Responsibilities of Den leaders w/ ideas

By Del and Brenda Schlosser

we cannot always build the future for our youth but we can build our youth for the future

We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future.

Franklin D. Roosevelt:

what makes cub scouts work
What Makes Cub Scouts Work?
  • Leaders
  • Parents
  • Role Models
the four t s of scouting
The Four T’s of Scouting
  • When a call comes to be a Scouting leader, that call should be taken very seriously. You have a sacred trust that’s been put upon you to be responsible in this calling that you’ve received. There are four major “T’s,” that I would like to refer to that will help you be successful in your calling as a Scouting leader.
first t
First "T"
  • The first “T” is the “T” of testimony. We encourage you to bear your testimony of the gospel of Jesus Christ, to strengthen your testimony, to have that testimony ever available so that the young men will know that you believe in Jesus Christ and His atoning sacrifice and that you want to serve Him all of your life.
second t
Second "T"
  • The second “T” requires your time. Scouting takes time, and so we expect that you will devote the proper amount of time, not that we expect you to neglect your other duties and responsibilities as a father and as a husband [or likewise, as a mother and as a wife]—a family leader— but time is required to be a good Scouting leader.
third t
Third "T"
  • The third “T” is to be trained. There are wonderful Scouting training camps and opportunities which give you the skills and attributes so that you will know the fine points of Scouting. Much of what is successful in this world comes down to the small, fine points, and you need to learn those.
fourth t
Fourth "T"
  • And finally, your tenure, the fourth “T,” is required, that you stay in [your] Scouting calling a lengthy period of time because, after being trained and learning the attributes of a good leader, we hope that those will endure for a lengthy period of time. As you examine the [eight] priesthood purposes for the Aaronic Priesthood [and likewise, the purpose and objectives of Primary], look carefully at what you are trying to accomplish when you plan an activity. As a young man becomes converted to the gospel of Jesus Christ and lives by its teachings, that goal is buttressed and supported by Scouting. And so as you look at what you’re going to plan for an activity, a teaching or training opportunity, examine how the priesthood purposes can be taught and trained while in that activity.
here are 3 things cub scout families want from their son s pack
Here are 3 things Cub Scout families want from their son’s pack:
  • 1. Active Fun. 
    • Most parents will not bring their boys to Cub Scouts if they are not having fun. They just won’t. Make sure that the boys in your pack get to do games and other active fun stuff–preferably in the outdoors.
here are 3 things cub scout families want from their son s pack1
Here are 3 things Cub Scout families want from their son’s pack:
  • 2. Well Organized.
    • Parents like packs in which the activities are well planned and which have good communication between leaders and with scout families. They want to know that there is a plan for what the pack will be doing and that the plan has been well communicated. Email, phone calls, schedules, and newsletters all help with communication and organization.
here are 3 things cub scout families want from their son s pack2
Here are 3 things Cub Scout families want from their son’s pack:
  • 3. Advancements.
    • Boys should be earning their rank badges as the year progresses, and they should receive recognition for the advancements they have earned. There should be a clear procedure (which gets carried out) for who in the pack is responsible for recording advancements, for turning in the required paperwork, and for presenting the badges at the appropriate time
making cub scouts work
Making Cub Scouts Work
  • Making Cub Scouts work smoothly can be a challenge.
  • In fact, there seems to be three major barriers in terms of having a Cub Scout program work well.
  • If these common pitfalls are addressed and solved, the other smaller problems will take care of themselves.
the three major barriers
The three major barriers
  • Training
  • Tenure
  • Correlation
training
Training
  • Problem number one: leaders and families are unfamiliar with the program. The solution to this is found in one word:
  • TRAINING
what training should i attend
What Training Should I Attend
  • Pack Planning meeting
  • Round Table
  • Pow-Wow
  • Leader Specific Training
  • Fast Start
  • Scouting Handbooks
tenure
Tenure
  • If leaders are properly educated and supported in their training, they will gain an understanding of and appreciation for the aims and purposes of Cub Scouting.
    • In the 2007 Aaronic Priesthood/Scouting Broadcast, President Charles W. Dahlquist II, Young Men General President, discussed tenure in Scouting. “Over time, leaders become trained, establish strong Scouting traditions, and build relationships of trust with the boys and their families. . . . Ideally, it would be wonderful to leave leaders of the youth in callings as long as possible.” Lack of tenure makes smooth operation of the Cub Scouting program difficult. In a well-run program, the boys will be able to look forward with anticipation to activities with leaders they can expect in future years.
correlation
Correlation
  • There are several ways Cub Scout requirements dovetail with Primary’s goals: the family, Character Connections, and Faith in God.
  • Family
    • Cub Scouting is a family program.
  • Character Connections
    • Character Connections reinforce gospel principles and subjects taught in Primary and at Cub meetings. Found as requirements throughout all three den’s books, Character Connections discuss topics like respect, faith, courage, and honesty. Passing off these requirements necessitates the boys to know, commit to, and practice these values.
correlation continued
Correlation Continued
  • Faith in God
    • A third way Primary and Cub Scouts reinforce one another is through the Faith in God program. This small booklet provides the requirements for the religious square knot patch. After he has earned it, this purple and silver patch is the only one that will remain with him on all his Scouting uniforms. He will wear it on his Boy Scout uniform and on his adult uniform as he becomes a leader.
    • The Faith in God program also uses other Scouting activities to reinforce gospel teachings that help these young boys prepare for the priesthood through handson activities. Many leaders try to incorporate one Faith in God achievement at least once a month in their Cub Scout meetings.
how do we corrilate
How do we Corrilate
  • Scouting and Faith in God
    • Many Faith in God requirements are more in-depth than the Cub Scout requirements;. Den leaders can plan activities that will satisfy both Faith in God and Cub Scout requirements.
    • For example, one Faith in God requirement is to learn budgeting and also learn about tithing, read scriptures and pay tithing and begin saving for a mission, while the Cub Scout requirements center mainly on budgeting and money management. What that means is that if the child has completed the Faith in God requirement, he has also completed the Cub Scout requirement, but completing the Cub Scout requirement does not necessarily mean he has completed the Faith in God requirement.
so how do we make this work
So how do we make this work
  • Planning
    • Schedule
      • Plan your Den Meeting – Know what requirements over lap
      • Plan time to work on both requirements, 1 week a month set aside time
cub scout den leader wolf bear dens

Cub Scout Den Leader(Wolf & Bear Dens)

Wherefore, now let every man learn his duty, and to act in the office in which he is appointed, in all

diligence. D&C 107:99

wolf bear dens
Wolf & Bear Dens
  • The Purposes of Your Calling: Through your ward-outlined Scouting Program, help the assigned young men in your ward ages 8 and 9 achieve the purposes of LDS Cub Scouting.
the purposes of lds cub scouting
The Purposes of LDS Cub Scouting
  • (1) Character development.
  • (2) Spiritual Growth.
  • (3) Good citizenship.
  • (4) Sportsmanship and fitness.
  • (5) Family understanding.
  • (6) Respectful relations.
  • (7) Personal achievement.
  • (8) Friendly service.
  • (9) Fun and adventure.
  • (10) Preparation for Boy Scouting.
  • (11) Preparing to receive the Aaronic Priesthood.
your stewardship qualifications
Your Stewardship Qualifications
  • Register with the Boy Scouts of America as an adult leader.
  • Wear a full Cub Scout leader uniform with appropriate insignia.
  • All Wolf (age 8) and/or Bear (age 9) Cub Scouts in your pack.
  • Attend Fast Start Training; Cub Scout Leader Basic Training; monthly Roundtable
  • Plan, direct, and conduct weekly den meetings.
  • Get to know and become aware of all Wolf and/or Bear Cub Scouts in your ward.
  • Supervise a working advancement program for Wolf and/or Bear Cub Scouts in your den(s).
  • Utilize den chief as activities assistant; assign other responsibilities to den chief as needed.
stewardship qualifications cont
Stewardship Qualifications Cont.
  • Encourage the importance of earning the Bobcat, Wolf, and Bear ranks.
  • Encourage the importance of earning the Arrow of Light Award as a Webelos Scout.
  • Encourage the Cub Scouts to wear a full uniform and set the example.
  • Read and follow the manuals fully.
  • Maintain the standards of the chartered organization and the BSA.
  • Secure adult assistance and resources as needed through your Pack Trainer and pack committee
  • Encourage parent involvement in you den(s).
stewardship qualifications cont1
Stewardship Qualifications Cont.
  • Meet regularly with the Den Chief. Let him help plan den meetings and den activities, and allow him to serve as den activities assistant.
  • Provide meaningful jobs for the Denner and Assistant Denner so they can learn responsibility and gain satisfaction from their efforts.
  • Help the den and pack earn the National Summertime Pack Award.
  • Help establish a close working relationship with the Assistant Den Leader and Den Chief, functioning as a Den Leadership team.
  • Develop a good working relationship with den parents and families. Use their talents to help enrich the den program. Hold den parents' meetings as often as needed to get acquainted and strengthen den operation. Have open communications with den families.
stewardship qualifications cont2
Stewardship Qualifications Cont.
  • Involve den fathers, uncles, and grandfathers in outings and other den activities so boys will have additional male role models.
  • See that a leader is available for all den meetings and activities. Call on the Assistant Den Leader or Pack Trainer to fill in when necessary.
  • Take part in the annual pack program planning conference and pack leaders' meetings (or Den Leader- Pack Trainer meetings).
  • Help set a good example for the boys by behavior, attitude, and proper uniforming.
  • Encourage Boys’ Life subscription coming into the home of each Cub Scout family; Cub Scout
  • Program Helps, the boys' program books, and other Cub Scouting literature as sources for program ideas
  • Maintain two-deep leadership in all activities.
  • Report regularly to Pack Trainer and Pack Committee Chair.
  • Rule One: KISMIF - Keep it simple, make it FUN!
the responsibilities can be boiled down to the following
The responsibilities can be boiled down to the following:
  • Work directly with other den and pack leaders to ensure their den is an active and successful part of the pack.
  • Plan, prepare for, and conduct den meetings with the Assistant Den Leader and Den Chief.
  • Attend the pack leaders' meetings.
  • Lead the den at the monthly pack activity.
qualities you should develep
Qualities you should develep:
  • Ability to work closely with boys ages 8 and 9
  • Ability to organize time effectively
  • Ability to develop leadership, team spirit, and follow the Cub Scout program as outlined
  • A testimony and good relationship with the Lord
meetings activities to attend
Meetings/Activities to attend:
  • Weekly den meetings
  • Monthly pack leaders meeting
  • Monthly pack meeting
  • Monthly district Roundtable
  • Annual Pack Program Planning Conference
  • Cub Scout Leader PowWow or Council Training Day
  • Other district and council activities
  • General church meetings
handbooks and other literature you should have to fulfill your calling
Handbooks and other literature you should have to fulfill your calling
  • Scouting Handbook (LDS)
  • Cub Scout Leader Book
  • Cub Scout Program Helps (annual publication)
  • Cub Scout Leader How-To Book
  • Wolf Cub Scout Book, Big Bear Cub Scout Book
webelos den leader
Webelos Den Leader
  • The Purposes of Your Calling: Through your ward-outlined Scouting Program, help the assigned young men in your ward age 10 achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting.
the purposes of lds cub scouting1
The Purposes of LDS Cub Scouting
  • (1) Character development.
  • (2) Spiritual Growth.
  • (3) Good citizenship.
  • (4) Sportsmanship and fitness.
  • (5) Family understanding.
  • (6) Respectful relations.
  • (7) Personal achievement.
  • (8) Friendly service.
  • (9) Fun and adventure.
  • (10) Preparation for Boy Scouting.
  • (11) Preparing to receive the Aaronic Priesthood.
your stewardship qualifications1
Your Stewardship Qualifications
  • Be a U.S. citizen at least 21 years of age and of good moral character.
  • Register with the Boy Scouts of America
  • Wear a full Webelos Scout leader uniform with appropriate insignia
  • All Webelos Scouts (age 10) in your pack
  • Attend Fast Start Training, Cub Scout Leader Basic Training, monthly Roundtable, and Cub Scout Fast Start.
  • Develop a working relationship with your troop to aid in Webelos-to-Scout transition
  • Get to know and become aware of all Webelos Scouts in your ward
stewardship qualifications cont3
Stewardship Qualifications Cont.
  • Supervise a working advancement program in the Webelos den that will result in each boy earning his Webelos Scout badge and Arrow of Light Award
  • Understand the complete Cub Scout program
  • Read and follow the manuals fully
  • Work in harmony with other den and pack leaders. Work with the Cubmaster and pack committee in recruiting new Webelos Scouts.
  • Help train the Webelos Den Chief and guide him to work with Webelos Scouts. Attend Den Chief training with him. See that he/she receives recognition for his efforts at den and pack meetings.
  • Meet regularly with the Webelos Den Chief. Let him help plan Webelos den meetings and activities.
  • Give him meaningful assignments.
  • Provide worthwhile tasks for the WebelosDenner so he can assume some responsibility and gain satisfaction from his efforts.
stewardship qualifications cont4
Stewardship Qualifications Cont.
  • Use Boys’ Life and Scouting magazines and Webelos Scout Program Helps as resources for ideas and information.
  • Instill Scouting's spirit and moral values by personal example, ceremonies, and meaningful activities such as service projects.
  • Keep accurate records of den attendance.
  • Encourage Webelos Scouts to advance. Maintain high advancement standards. Keep accurate advancement records and see that the boys are promptly recognized for their achievements.
stewardship qualifications cont5
Stewardship Qualifications Cont.
  • With the help of the Cubmaster, pack committee, and unit commissioner, establish a good working relationship with the ward’s troops.
  • Work with the Eleven Year Old Scout (EYOS) Assistant Scoutmaster to plan and conduct meaningful joint activities.
  • Work with the Cubmaster to see that impressive graduation ceremonies are conducted in the pack.
  • Invite the EYOS Leader and troop leaders to take part.
  • Ask qualified persons, including adult family members, to serve as activity badge counselors.
  • Encourage parents of Webelos Scouts to help plan and carry out overnight campouts and other outdoor activities.
stewardship qualifications cont6
Stewardship Qualifications Cont.
  • Help the den and the pack earn the National Summertime Pack Award.
  • Follow the policies of the Boy Scouts of America.
  • Have a plan to ensure that a leader is available for all Webelos den meetings and activities. Call on the
  • Assistant Webelos Den Leader to fill in, as needed.
  • Participate in the annual pack program planning conference and the monthly pack leaders' meetings.
  • Keep the Cubmaster and pack committee informed on the status and needs of the Webelos den.
stewardship qualifications cont7
Stewardship Qualifications Cont.
  • Maintain the standards of the chartered organization (ward) and the BSA
  • Secure adult assistance and resources as needed through the pack committee
  • Encourage parent involvement in your den and close relationships between boys, leaders and families
  • Encourage Boys’ Life subscription coming into the home of each Cub Scout family
  • Maintain two-deep leadership in all activities
  • Prepare boys to become active Boy Scouts
  • Prepare boys to receive the Aaronic Priesthood
  • Rule One: KISMIF - Keep it simple, make if fun!
the responsibilities can be boiled down to the following1
The responsibilities can be boiled down to the following:
  • Work directly with other den and pack leaders to ensure the den is an active and successful.
  • Plan, prepare for, and conduct den meetings with the assistant and Den Chief.
  • Attend pack leaders' meetings.
  • Lead the den at the pack meetings and activities.
qualities you should develop
Qualities you should develop:
  • Ability to work closely with boys age 10
  • Ability to organize time effectively
  • Ability to develop leadership, team spirit, and follow the Cub Scout program as outlined
  • A testimony and good relationship with the Lord
meetings activities to attend1
Meetings/Activities to attend:
  • Weekly Webelos den meetings
  • Monthly pack leaders meeting
  • Monthly pack meeting
  • Monthly district Roundtable
  • Annual Pack Program Planning Conference
  • Cub Scout Leader PowWow or Council Training Day
  • Other district and council activities
handbooks and other literature you should have to fulfill your calling1
Handbooks and other literature you should have to fulfill your calling
  • Scouting Handbook (LDS)
  • Cub Scout Leader Book
  • Cub Scout Leader How-To Book
  • Webelos Scout Leader Book; Webelos Leader Guide
webelos den leader1
WEBELOS DEN LEADER
  • ATTEND NEW LEADERS ESSENTIALS TRAINING
  • ATTEND CUB LEADER SPECIFIC TRAINING
  • ATTEND YOUTH PROTECTION TRAINING
  • REGISTER WITH BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
  • ATTEND MONTHLY ROUNDTABLE
  • ATTEND MONTHLY WARD KEY SCOUT LEADERS MEETING
  • PLAN DIRECT AND CONDUCT WEEKLY WEBELOS DEN MEETING
  • WORK WITH WEBELOS ON PASSING OF ACTIVITY BADGE REQUIREMENTS
  • WEAR A FULL SCOUT UNIFORM
  • ATTEND MONTH PACK MEETING
  • ATTEND MONTHLY PACK LEADERS MEETING
den leaders
DEN LEADERS
  • ATTEND NEW LEADERS ESSENTIALS TRAINING
  • ATTEND CUB LEADER SPECIFIC TRAINING
  • ATTEND YOUTH PROTECTION TRAINING
  • REGISTER WITH BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
  • ATTEND MONTHLY CUB SCOUT ROUNDTABLE
  • WEAR A FULL SCOUT LEADERS UNIFORM
  • PLAN, DIRECT AND CONDUCT WEEKLY DEN MEETING
  • ATTEND MONTHLY PACK MEETING
  • ATTEND MONTHLY PACK LEADER MEETING
the cub scout promise

The Cub Scout Promise

I ________ promise to do my bestTo do my duty to God and my country,To help other people, andTo obey the Law of the Pack

the law of the pack

The Law of the Pack

The Cub Scout follows Akela.The Cub Scout helps the pack go.The pack helps the Cub Scout grow.The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

roundtable attendance
Roundtable Attendance
  • While BSA basic training and supplemental Church training provide an excellent foundation, attendance at monthly roundtables for Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Varsity Scout, and Venturing adult leaders helps a leader renew skills, allows leaders to share ideas, and informs leaders about upcoming district/council events. Roundtables are an excellent opportunity for Scout leaders in the Church to gain a deeper understanding of practical ways to use Scouting in fulfilling their Church responsibilities. Volunteering as members of their district roundtable staff is another way for Church Scout leaders to serve at the district level, while forming new friendships and getting a head start on planning their unit activities.
1 be active
#1 – Be Active
  • Keep your den and pack meetings focused on activities rather than the boys having to just sit and listen. If you need to cover something instructional, turn it into a game, a quiz, a contest– something where the boys are actually involved and doing things.
  • And preferably it should be something that gets them out of their chairs. Get them physically moving around. Play active games. Look at stuff. Go outside. These are the kinds of things that boys enjoy.
2 field trips
#2 – Field Trips
  • Boys love field trips, and parents usually like them also. Boys like variety. Going somewhere new is almost always fun and exciting for them.
3 outdoor focus
#3 – Outdoor Focus
  • Spending time outdoors doing stuff like hiking and camping are what boys are really looking forward to when they join Cub Scouts.
  • Make sure that hiking, camping, and other outdoor activities are a central part of your program. If your pack does not have regular Cub Scout hikes, I would encourage you to start.
  • Of course, any outdoor Cub Scout activities need to be done in accordance with the Guide to Safe Scouting including the Age-Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities.
  • Be sure that you promote in your pack Council-organized Cub Scout family camps and day camps. Boys who get to camp are the ones who are most excited about Cub Scouting.
4 stay in touch
#4 – Stay in Touch
  • Communication with your pack families is very important.
  • For example, I think it’s a good idea whenever a boy is absent for your Cub meetings/activities, to give his parents a call. At the very least, you should call when the boy has missed two meetings in a row.Most parents are very appreciative that someone noticed their son wasn’t there and is checking to see how he is doing. Of course, you shouldn’t say “Why wasn’t Tommy here tonight?” You can say “We just wanted to let you know that we missed Tommy at our last activity. Is he doing okay?” In my experience, parents are usually glad that someone has called. Staying in touch like this is often enough to keep a boy who misses a few meetings from dropping out altogether.
  • Of course, sometimes boys have to miss for an extended period of time due to sports activities. When that happens, I always tell them that’s fine. We just ask that they stay in touch with us and with what we are doing, and we’ll welcome them back when their sports season is over.
5 summer
#5 – Summer
  • Don’t stop your Cub Scout program for summer. Summer is when boys have the most free time on their hands, and it is when they need Cub Scouting the most.
  • It is a lot easier to keep your scouts coming to your scouting program in the fall if you haven’t stopped for a three-month break. Cub Scouts are much more likely to drop out in the fall if they haven’t done any Cub Scout activities all summer.
6 schedule
#6 – Schedule
  • Making and distributing a schedule several months in advance can be a boost for your pack in several ways.
  • For one thing, it will make your pack look fun and exciting. Just telling your scouts and parents that your pack does hiking, camping, outdoor games, Pinewood Derby, etc. is fine, but it is more convincing if you can hand out a schedule that shows that you have committed your plans to paper.
  • A schedule will also help with new scout recruiting. Your schedule will show new recruits that your pack is well-run, organized, and lots of fun.
  • If you don’t make a schedule, it is easier for your pack to let the time slip by and not do the stuff you hoped you would.
7 webelos appeal
#7 – Webelos Appeal
  • There is a lot of difference between 6 and 7 year olds and 10 and 11 year olds. Some activities that are a lot of fun for your Wolf and Bear dens would be way too young and kiddie-ish for most Webelos Scouts.
  • One of the great things about putting on a Cub Scout program is seeing how much boys grow and develop from the time they are Wolfs until they are fifth-grade Webelos. Be sure most of your pack activities are designed for the interests and needs of all your boys.
kismif

KISMIF

Keep it Simple, Make it Fun!

slide66

President Monson said, “They depend on you. Their very salvation may be at stake. You can build a bridge to the heart of a boy and can help guide his precious soul back to our Father in Heaven.”

  • Leaders and parents who recognize and follow this counsel concerning Scouting will do a great service to future generations of the world as we help these young boys grow and mature.
helpful links
Helpful Links
  • http://www.scouting.org/scoutsource/CubScouts.aspx
  • http://www.lds-scouts.org/
  • http://www.scoutermom.com/content/?cat=162
  • http://dyetub.com/
  • http://kismif.org/2010/05/10/cub-scouts-2010-den-and-pack-meeting-resource-guide/
  • http://lds.org/pa/display/0,17884,4819-1,00.html