welcome instructional leaders common core the schools of oakland county n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Welcome Instructional Leaders: Common Core & the Schools of Oakland County PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Welcome Instructional Leaders: Common Core & the Schools of Oakland County

play fullscreen
1 / 90

Welcome Instructional Leaders: Common Core & the Schools of Oakland County

84 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Welcome Instructional Leaders: Common Core & the Schools of Oakland County

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. WelcomeInstructional Leaders:Common Core & the Schools of Oakland County Michael Yocum & Common Core Planning Member

  2. Purpose of our day…to launch the preparation of Instructional Leaders for the shifts required to lead and support the common core. Michael Yocum

  3. Guiding Question What are the leadership implications for you, your staff, your school and your district?

  4. Today is the first in a series of leadership support, as we all begin to implement the common core state standards & prepare for upcoming assessments. Michael Yocum

  5. Before we get started, take a minute at your table to be sure everyone has met, …in a round of sharing offer the group, what brings you to the table today, and how are you thinking about today’s purpose? Connector Lauren

  6. Poll Everywhere Current State Kristine

  7. Todaysmeet.com/ Parking Lot Kristine

  8. Building context Assessment Tasks

  9. ELA task Laura Schiller

  10. Audience Participation Laura Schiller Writing Practice: Without looking ahead, (NO CHEATING!!) we will follow the directions for the following assessment. You will read and write your response.

  11. Laura Schiller

  12. Laura Schiller

  13. Laura Schiller

  14. Laura Schiller

  15. Laura Schiller

  16. What does the learner need to know and do in order to be successful on this task? Kristine

  17. Whole Group Debrief Kristine

  18. Math task Geraldine Devine

  19. What does the learner need to know and do in order to be successful on this task? Kristine

  20. Sample Performance Task Assume the role of an architect designing a park. See page 10 for design requirements. Geraldine Devine

  21. Explore “Session 1” Three construction companies sent bids for work in the park. What do you notice about the three bids? What information would you need to compare the bids? Geraldine Devine

  22. Scoring “Session 1” Explore the grading rubric and sample response on pages 20 and 23. Geraldine Devine

  23. Geraldine Devine

  24. Geraldine Devine

  25. Geraldine Devine

  26. What does the learner need to know and do in order to be successful on this task? Table conversation and sharing Kristine

  27. Table conversation and sharing Poll everywhere Kristine

  28. Oral Language Verbal (written and oral) Real-World Situations Pictures Geometric/ Graphical Contextual Written Symbols Manipulative Models Symbolic Tabular Multiple Representations Adapted from Lesh, R., Post, T., & Behr, M. (1987). Representations and Translations among Representations in Mathematics Learning and Problem Solving.

  29. Standards for Mathematical Practice • Select one of the Standards for Mathematical Practice to read. • Discuss this practice standard in light of the “Designing a Park” task.

  30. Looking across the assessment tasks, what are challenges for instructors and learners as we implement the CCSS? What is standing out for you? Kristine

  31. Poll Everywhere Wordle Kristine

  32. Guiding Question Michael Yocum What are the leadership implications for you, your staff, your school and your district?

  33. Break Michael Yocum

  34. Common Core State Standards (CCSS) • Assessments • Learning Progressions • Shifts/Practices The following slides may provide new or previously learned information. Depending on your level of experience with the CCSS you may need to: • Focus on making sense of the information • View through the lens of implications for your district Dana Lauren Michele Susan

  35. CCSS States and the Assessment Consortia Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) Balanced

  36. Balanced and Dynamic Learning Maps Assessment Consortia CCSS Assessment Systems in Michigan http://www.smarterbalanced.org http://dynamiclearningmaps.org alternative assessment for students with significant cognitive disabilities Dana Lauren Michele Susan

  37. The Schools of Oakland County

  38. A Balanced System Dana Lauren Michele Susan

  39. Smarter Balanced Assessment With a partner, discuss how you would go about solving this task. Short Item

  40. Standards for Mathematical Practice Reasoning and explaining William McCallum Standards for Mathematical Practice Tucson, April 2011 Modeling and Using tools Seeing structure and generalizing

  41. There are two parts in this performance assessment. In the first part, you will be asked to complete a task in which you synthesize the various perspectives on the American dream you have encountered in high school and elsewhere. Your analysis of these texts and the work you do to select, arrange, and understand the different perspectives each offers are important work in and of themselves, but they also prepare the way for the inclusion of an additional voice—your own. In the second part of the assessment, you will have the chance to offer your own perspective on the American dream by crafting a text of your own about an American dreamer you know.

  42. SBAC Content Specifications for Summative Assessment • There are 5 learning outcomes or CLAIMS for the CCSS ELA standards: • Read closely and critically to comprehend a range of increasingly complex literary and informational texts. • Produce effective writing for a range of purposes and audiences • Employ effective speaking and listening skills for a range of purposes and audiences. • Engage appropriately in collaborative and independent inquiry to investigate/research topics, pose questions, and gather and present information. • Skillfully use and interpret written language across a range of literacy tasks.

  43. Claim 1: Concepts and Procedures, ≈ 40% • “Students can explain and apply mathematical concepts and interpret and carry out mathematical procedures with precision and fluency.” Assessment Reporting Categories: The Claims • “Students can solve a range of complex well-posed problems in pure and applied mathematics, making productive use of knowledge and problem solving strategies.” Claim 2: Problem Solving ≈ 20% “Each claim is a summary statement about the knowledge and skill students will be expected to demonstrate on the assessment related to a particular aspect of the CCSS for mathematics.” • “Students can clearly and precisely construct viable arguments to support their own reasoning and to critique the reasoning of others.” Claim 3: Communicating Reasoning ≈ 20% Claim 4: Data Analysis and Modeling ≈ 20% • “Students can analyze complex, real-world scenarios and can construct and use mathematical models to interpret and solve problems.”

  44. Assessment Principles www.smarterbalanced.org • Assessments are grounded in a thoughtful, standards-based curriculum and are managed as part of an integrated system. • Assessments include evidence of student performance. • Teachers are integrally involvedin the development and scoring of assessments. • Assessments are structured to continuously improve teaching and learning. • Assessment, reporting, and accountability systems provide useful information on multiple measures.