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Lord of the Flies

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  1. Lord of the Flies What does it mean to be civilized?

  2. Common Core State Standards in Lord of the Flies Key Ideas and Details • 10.RL.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. • 10.RL.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. • 10.RL.3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

  3. Common Core State Standards in Lord of the Flies Craft and Structure • 10.RL.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). • 10.RL.5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. • 10.RL.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

  4. Common Core State Standards in Lord of the Flies Integration of Knowledge and Ideas • 10.RL.7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment • 10.RL.9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). [allusions and inspirations] Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity • 10.RL.10 By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently [without scaffolding].

  5. Common Core State Standards in Lord of the Flies • 10.W.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole. d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. • 10.W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. • Apply grades 9–10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]”). • 10.W.10 To write routinely over extended time periods and for shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  6. Common Core State Standards in Lord of the Flies • 10. SL.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  7. Common Core State Standards in Lord of the Flies • 10.L.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. • 10.L.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. • 10.L.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9–10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. (Using context, language strategies, or available print or online resources.) • 10.L.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and analyze their role in the text. b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

  8. Day 1- Anticipation & Pre-reading • Content Goals: • Elections of Leaders (volunteers 2012) • Rubric for Leaders • Final Project Options & Rubric • Symbolism Mini-Lesson • Language Goals: • To respectfully elect leaders for groups, review expectations for the unit, and discuss symbolism.

  9. Elections • We need to nominate twelve leaders who will represent our class the best academically.

  10. Peer Teaching Project + Rubric • The checklist is also your rubric. If you do everything on the checklist, you will earn full credit.

  11. Final Project Options + Rubric • Take a look at your project options and rubric sheet.

  12. Project Option #1 • Parody Movie: Your movie version will mock the essential themes of the novel while moving it to a high school setting. Your cast must include Ralph, Piggy, Jack, Simon, and Samneric. A script is mandatory: a project will be worth a maximum of half credit without a script. A well-planned, finished product is a must. The video must be formatted to share in the presentation on: VHS, DVD, or YouTube location. 3 minute maximum. (Up to five credit earning members) • CCSS 10.W.3 narrative writing

  13. Piggy, piggy, piggy, can’t you see? Project Option #2 • Rap or Song Summary (music video optional): Summarize the most important details from all 12 chapters in the lyrics of your song or rap. Be prepared to perform your song/rap live or by recording (CD, DVD) and hand-in a typed copy of the lyrics that labels which lyrics match which chapter. A project will be worth a maximum of half credit without typed, labeled lyrics. (Individual project) • CCSS 10.W.3 narrative writing

  14. Project Option #3 • Comic Book: Write and draw a comic book (computer-aided optional) that summarizes the most important details from all 12 chapters in Lord of the Flies. Include four pictures and four dialog balloons for each chapter. Your drawings cannot include stick figures but may include clip art. The scenes and dialog you select must summarize the most important elements of each chapter. (Individual Project) • CCSS 10.W.3 narrative writing

  15. Project Option #4 • Digital Story: Choose one chapter to reenact with quotes, actions, and scenery directly from the novel. Draw, photograph, and/or choose clip art to represent scenes from the novel. A digital story is a computer-generated movie (using iMovie or Windows Movie Maker), so you will record the script for your chapter, add the pictures, add sound effects, add background music, cite the source of any music you use at the end of your story, and finally produce your project. A digital story will look like a moving comic book for one, specific chapter. Bring your finished project on a USB drive, CD, or save it to YouTube. 3 minute maximum (Individual project) • CCSS 10.W.3 narrative writing

  16. Project Option #5 • Historical Context Research: You will research British history in the early days of the Cold War (1945-1954) to determine similarities in the current events and analyze how they became Golding’s inspiration for LotF. Keep a focus on key characters, themes, and issues within the plot to fully explore the similarities between the source material and Golding’s classic novel. This is an independent project, and the final draft must represent your best writing skills. MLA format and citations must be used. • CCSS 10.W.7 research projects

  17. Project Option #6 • Source Material Research: You will read Coral Island, Golding’s inspiration for LotF, and contrast his text with the original. Keep a focus on key characters, themes, and issues within the plot to fully explore the differences between the source material and Golding’s classic novel. This is an independent project, and the final draft must represent your best writing skills. MLA format and citations must be used. • Coral Island is available on-line to read for free on Gutenburg.org • CCSS 10.RL.9 Transforming source material

  18. Final Project Rubric • You are encouraged to publish your projects online (at a blog or YouTube) instead of bringing them to class. [10.W.6 using technology to produce and/or publish] • All projects will be presented to meet Common Core Standards for Speaking and Listening. • You are encouraged to enhance your presentation with digital media (i.e. photos contemporary to 1945-1954 in England) CCSS 10.SL.5 • Look at the rubric and read along.

  19. Pre-reading Goals- Day 2 • Content Goals- We will take a look at our question “What does it mean to be civilized?” to set the tone for our new novel Lord of the Flies. We will make inferences, compare & contrast, and examine the author’s purpose. • Language Goals- We will look at a famous painting and “read” it like a literary text, write answers to some questions, and discuss answers respectfully. We will also take notes on literary terms and characters’ names.

  20. Considering all the visual cues Pablo Picasso gives in his painting, Guernica, what inferences can you make about the setting? Cite five or more details from this visual text in your answer.

  21. Compare/Contrast these two settings. Discussion Points: • 2 Similarities • 1 Difference • 1 Prediction • Artist’s Purpose

  22. Being stranded on a tropical island would be paradise. Children can naturally organize themselves. Our environment can greatly impact the course of our lives. Leaders rarely dominate weaker people. People tend to follow a charismatic leader. People often misjudge things they don’t understand. Children act differently from grown-ups. There is usually a clear-cut winner in conflicts. Agree or Disagree? (Nuance)

  23. Question & Answer Survey • If this English class were put on a deserted, tropical island, what would happen? • When you watch little kids play together, are they nice to each other? • What is the cruelest, meanest thing you’ve ever done? • Have you ever been hunting? Why? If so, did you kill anything, and how did that feel? • Have you ever shot anyone/anything in a video game? How did that feel? • Have you ever been alone, outside, in the dark? How did it feel?

  24. Pre-Reading Day 3 • Content Goals • Characters’ Names • Author’s Biography • Author’s Purpose • Coral Island • Start chapter 1 • Language Goals • To read selections from The Coral Island and discuss how they may have annoyed the author.

  25. Name Meanings • Each of the main characters in this novel has symbolic meaning. You can tell a bit about each boy based on the meaning of his name. • Please take notes.

  26. Ralph • Derived from the Anglo-Saxon word for “council” (government)

  27. Jack • Derived from Hebrew name Jacob which means “supplanter” or “one who takes over”

  28. Piggy • His mean nickname (doesn’t even rate being called by his real name). • Pigs, by the way, are the only animal to hunt on the island. • He is often vulnerable, reduced in importance, and not respected

  29. Simon • Derived from Hebrew name Shim’on which means “one who listens” or “one who observes”

  30. Sam & Eric = Samneric • Identical twins who are always together • What could this symbolize?

  31. Roger • “famous with a spear”

  32. Littluns • A name for all the little children – mostly whose names we never learn.

  33. William Golding, Author • Born in 1911, Golding was the son of an English schoolmaster, a many-talented man who believed strongly in science and rational thought. Golding often described his father's overwhelming influence on his life. The author graduated from Oxford University in 1935 and spent four years (later described by Golding as having been "wasted") writing, acting, and producing for a next small London theater. Golding himself became schoolmaster for a year, after marrying Ann Brookfield in 1939 and before entering the British Royal Navy in 1940. • From an unknown schoolmaster in 1954, when Lord of the Flies was first published…. In 1983 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature…. Golding died of a heart attack in 1993. • http://www.monmouth.com/~literature/LOTF/student/Bio.htm

  34. Author’s Purpose • “…finally getting the idea for Lord of the Flies after reading a bedtime boys adventure story [The Coral Island (1857) by R.M. Ballantyne] to his small children. Golding wondered out loud to his wife whether it would be a good idea to write such a story but to let the characters ‘behave as they really would.’ His wife thought that would be a ‘first class idea.’ With that encouragement, Golding found that writing the story, the ideas for which had been germinating in his mind for some time, was simply a matter of getting it down on paper.” • http://www.monmouth.com/~literature/LOTF/student/Bio.htm

  35. Chapter 1 – The Sound of the Shell • Content (Reading) Goal- We will make inferences, compare/contrast, and draw conclusions while actively reading Lord of the Flies. • Language Goal- 10.W.9 use textual evidence to support analyses; 10.SL.1 engage in collaborative discussions; 10.L.1-2 demonstrate command of English conventions

  36. Small Group Norms based on Common Core Standards - • 10. SL.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. d. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions , and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

  37. Small Group Norms – 2nd period • Come to discussions prepared = be ready to talk about what you read (read, listen while others read, do your worksheet) • Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making= • don’t be cranky • Stay on task • Don’t talk over other people • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = focus on topic or group taskmaster will get you back on task • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = respectful disagreements need a statement of “that’s okay for you, but…” If the group needs to agree unanimously, the outlier needs to be convinced by the others

  38. Small Group Norms – Period 5 • Come to discussions prepared = must read the chapter and pay attention in class, must have completed the worksheet; if you don’t prepare, you can’t get the points the group earns working together • Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making= • Members can only talk if the “president” allows them • Scribe or secretary roles must be assigned. • Everyone must participate and do their part (or they don’t get credit, see rule #1) • Students who don’t listen and participate won’t get their group to repeat answers. • Groups who are not productive will be broken-up; members will work alone silently • Don’t touch each other. • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = encourage group-mates to participate; when you’re frustrated, if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = use text-based evidence to persuade outliers, with opinions: give reasons and respect each other

  39. Small Group Norms – Period 6 • Come to discussions prepared = be prepared with supplies and book, have read the chapter, pay attention/read along in class, do the worksheet; peers who aren’t up to speed need to read silently; the group will not share answers with the unprepared members • Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making= • The group disciplines each other; detentions may be given. • Elect a smart person to be your group’s “president” • Don’t disrupt reading or group work time • No copying answers; copying is cheating. Your answers need to be in your own words. • Slackers won’t get group help (see rule #1) • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = motivate group members to participate; bring quiet group members out of their shells • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = settle group disagreements with text-based evidence; find polite ways to show you disagree

  40. Small Group Norms • Come to discussions prepared = • Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making= • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions =

  41. Small Group Norms – Period 1 • Come to discussions prepared = read what you’re supposed to. When we’re reading in class, pay attention. When you have to read at home, do it! Do your worksheet. • Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making. • Respect everyone’s opinion • Don’t be disruptive. • See rule #1; if you don’t help, you don’t get graded. • Have orderly participation. Include everyone. • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = everyone participates. See rule 2.3 • Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions = think before you speak

  42. Vocabulary (LC04) • “They were twins, and the eye was shocked and incredulous at such cheery duplication” (19). (2pts) • Define from context not dictionary: • Explanation for definition based on context:

  43. Language Practice • Piggy seamed to be the most intelligent Jack was the natural leader but Ralph was the most attractive and also possessed the conch (2 pts)

  44. Using Modern Language Association (MLA) formatted parenthetical citations • When you answer CAT questions, your evidence must come from the text. It’s best if you quote at least one of your details (and paraphrase the other. Here’s how: We can infer that Piggy would be a great leader because he suggests how Ralph should lead from the start. He told Ralph to call the meeting, and he told Ralph how to blow the conch and said, “You try, Ralph. You’ll call the others” (16). • Notice that the quote is blended into the sentence.

  45. CAT Questions Restate the question in your answer and write complete sentences. Cite very specific details from the text as evidence. (9 pts) • (LC03) What is the most likely reason that Jack assumes he should be elected chief? Provide two details from chapter 1 to support your answer. • (LA06) What are two differences between Piggy and Ralph? Include information from chapter 1 in your answer. • (LT10) One conclusion a reader can draw from this chapter is that the conch represents leadership. Provide two details from the chapter to support this conclusion.

  46. Soundtrack Song • What song do you think is perfect for this chapter? • Who performs it? • Why do you think it’s perfect for this chapter?

  47. Multiple Intelligence Activity • In this chapter, Jack and the boys try to dominate the island by mapping and exploring it (man versus nature). Draw a map of the island based on the descriptions of chapter 1. (10 details for 5 pts)

  48. Multiple Intelligence Activity • In this chapter, Jack and the boys try to dominate the island by mapping and exploring it (man versus nature). Draw a map of the island based on the descriptions of chapter 1. (10 details for 5 pts)

  49. Positive Profile: Ralph • Strengths:   • Hobbies: • Physical Description: • Actions & Words of Character:   • Smartest Action Performed: • Questionable Actions:   • Positive Statement About the Character:

  50. Chapter 2- Fire on the Mountain Content Goal- We will make inferences, recognize conflict, and draw conclusions while actively reading Lord of the Flies. Language Goal- 10.W.9 use textual evidence to support analyses; 10.SL.1 engage in collaborative discussions; 10.L.1-2 demonstrate command of English conventions