slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 37

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 290 Views
  • Uploaded on

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT. EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT Four Basic Components of Emotions : Stimuli that provoke a reaction Feelings – Pos. or neg. conscious experiences of which we become aware Physiological arousal Behavioral response Example:. EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT' - Mia_John


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Four Basic Components of Emotions:
  • Stimuli that provoke a reaction
  • Feelings – Pos. or neg. conscious experiences of which we become aware
  • Physiological arousal
  • Behavioral response
  • Example:
slide3

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Sequence of Emotional Development:

Newborn

3 months

2 ½ - 6 months

8 – 10 months

Second year

Third year

slide6

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Functions of Emotions:
  • Adaptive function
  • Communication
  • Social relationships
  • Sociomoral development
  • Source of pleasure or pain
slide7

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Temperament: a person’s characteristic modes of responding emotionally and behaviorally to environmental events, including such attributes as activity level, irritability, fearfulness, and sociability.

Moderately heritable! Non-shared experiences affect later temperament.

slide8

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

New York Longitudinal Study: 40% Easy, 10% Difficult, 15% Slow-to-Warm-Up, rest showed unique patterns

slide9

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Attachment: a close emotional relationship between two persons characterized by….

1. Mutual affection

2. Frequent interaction and close proximity

3. Selectivity

slide10

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Infant characteristics promoting attachment:
  • “kewpie doll” appearance
  • Rooting, sucking, grasping reflexes
  • Smiling
  • Cooing, babbling
  • Crying
  • Synchronous movement
slide11

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Infant characteristics making attachments more difficult:
  • Physically unattractive
  • Weak reflexes
  • Irritable
  • Little pleasant vocalization
  • Irritating, shrill cry
  • Easily over stimulated
slide12

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Caregiver characteristics hindering attachment:
  • Maternal depression
  • Abused mother
  • Mother doesn’t want baby
  • Mother unable to take lead
  • Mother insensitive to infant
slide14

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Ecological Constraints on Attachment:
  • Several children
  • Poor marital relationship
slide15

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Theories of Attachment
  • Psychoanalytic Theory
  • Learning Theory
  • Cognitive-Developmental Theory
  • Ethological Theory
    • Summary of Evidence
  • Feeding not as critical as once believed.
  • Contact comfort & responsive interaction are important.
  • Timing is related to obj. perm.
  • Infants are active participants.
slide16

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Stranger Anxiety – Wary reaction to a stranger which occurs shortly after attachment to a primary caregiver.

Separation Anxiety – Wary or fretful reaction that infants and toddlers often display when separated from the person(s) to whom they are attached.

slide17

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Separation Anxiety

slide18

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Why Infants Fear Separation and Strangers

“Conditioned Anxiety” Hypothesis

- Separation

- Strangers

- Comments

Ethological Viewpoint

- Separation

- Strangers

slide19

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Why Infants Fear Separation and Strangers
  • Cognitive-Developmental Viewpoint
  • - Separation
  • - Strangers
  • Conclusion:
  • Child’s fear of losing warmth/security of caregiver
  • Apprehension of unfamiliar
  • Inability to fit into existing schemes.
slide20

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Types of Attachment
  • Secure Attachment
  • Explores
  • Distressed when separated
  • Warmly greets mom
  • Outgoing to strangers when mom is there
  • Insecure Attachment (Anxious/Resistant)
  • Anxious
  • Very distressed when separated
  • Ambivalent on mom’s return
  • Wary of strangers when mom is there
slide21

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Types of Attachment
  • Insecure Attachment (Anxious/Avoidant)
  • Not interested in exploring
  • Little distress when separated
  • Avoids contact on return
  • Not wary of stranger
  • Insecure Attachment (Disorganized/disoriented)
  • Show mixture of other two types of insecure attachment
  • Show approach/avoidance conflict when mom returns
slide23

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Explanations of Attachment Differences

Ainsworth’s Caregiving Hypothesis: quality of an infant’s attachment depends largely on the kind of attention the infant has received.

Secure attachment:

Insecure attachment (anxious/resistant):

Insecure attachment (anxious/avoidant):

Insecure attachment (disorganized/disoriented):

slide24

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Explanations of Attachment Differences

Ainsworth’s Strange Situation

slide25

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Explanations of Attachment Differences

Kagan’s Temperament Hypothesis: quality of an infant’s attachment reflects individual differences in infant temperament. All other factors being equal, then:

Easy temperament:

Difficult temperament:

Slow-to-warm-up temperament:

slide26

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Explanations of Attachment Differences

slide27

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Explanations of Attachment Differences

Kagan’s Temperament Hypothesis: quality of an infant’s attachment reflects individual differences in infant temperament. All other factors being equal, then:

Easy temperament:

Difficult temperament:

Slow-to-warm-up temperament:

Who is correct? What is the evidence?

slide28

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Long-term Correlates of Attachment Quality

Securely attached toddlers and preschoolers tend to be:

1. Better problem solvers at age 2

2. More creative

3. More attractive playmates

4. Initiate play activities

5. Sensitive to others

6. Curious

7. Self-directed

8. Eager to learn

slide29

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Important Factors in Daycare & Attachment
  • Quality of care
  • Parental attitudes
  • Two-parent or Single parent?
  • Socioeconomic status (SES)
slide30

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Important Factors in Daycare & Attachment

Characteristics of High Quality Day Care:

1. Child-to-caregiver ratio

2. Caregivers warm/expressive/responsive

3. Little staff turnover

4. Age-appropriate curriculum

5. Administration willing/eager to confer with parents about child

slide31

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Daycare & Attachment

slide32

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • The “Unattached” Infant
  • Harlow’s Studies of Socially-Deprived Monkeys
slide33

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • The “Unattached” Infant
  • Harlow’s Studies of Socially-Deprived Monkeys
  • Three months of Isolation
    • Characteristics displayed
    • Recovery?
slide34

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • The “Unattached” Infant
  • Harlow’s Studies of Socially-Deprived Monkeys
  • Three months of Isolation
  • Six months of Isolation
    • Characteristics displayed
    • Recovery?
slide35

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • The “Unattached” Infant
  • Harlow’s Studies of Socially-Deprived Monkeys
  • Three months of Isolation
  • Six months of Isolation
  • Twelve months of Isolation
  • a. Characteristics displayed
  • b. Recovery?
slide36

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • The “Unattached” Infant
  • Harlow’s Studies of Socially-Deprived Monkeys
  • Three months of Isolation
  • Six months of Isolation
  • Twelve months of Isolation
  • Summary of this work
  • Later recovery
slide37

EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • The “Unattached” Infant
  • Harlow’s Studies of Socially-Deprived Monkeys

B. Early Social Deprivation in children

1. Characteristics of Infants

2. Characteristics of Toddlers/Older Children

3. How to Aid Recovery from Early Social Deprivation