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TRANSGENIC:HOW THEY AFFECT ORGANIC AGRICULTURE IN NORTH DAKOTA Brad Brummond NDSU Extension Service/ Walsh County 2002 NORTH DAKOTA First in organic grain production 90,000 acres certified production UNITED STATES 1992-1997 certified organic cropland has more then doubled

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transgenic how they affect organic agriculture in north dakota

TRANSGENIC:HOW THEY AFFECT ORGANIC AGRICULTURE IN NORTH DAKOTA

Brad Brummond

NDSU Extension Service/ Walsh County 2002

north dakota
NORTH DAKOTA
  • First in organic grain production
  • 90,000 acres certified production
united states
UNITED STATES
  • 1992-1997 certified organic cropland has more then doubled
  • Medium term growth rates 22%
importance of organic agriculture
IMPORTANCE OF ORGANIC AGRICULTURE
  • Viable, fast growing segment of agriculture in ND, U.S. and world
problems facing organic agriculture
PROBLEMS FACING ORGANIC AGRICULTURE
  • Organic standards have no set tolerances
  • Growing acreage of GMO crops in North Dakota and United States
  • UP of organic grains with GMO material will decertify it
  • Possible loss of markets
keeping seed supply free of u p
KEEPING SEED SUPPLY FREE OF U.P.
  • Growing acreage of transgenic soybeans, corn and canola
    • pollen drift and insects
  • Concern about purity of North Dakota Seedstock Program
pollen drift
POLLEN DRIFT
  • Seen as one of the biggest threats to organic crops
    • abandonment of certified organic canola production by most producers
  • Organic growers trying to to develop procedures to deal with this
unintended presence within the system
UNINTENDED PRESENCE WITHIN THE SYSTEM
  • Some buyers will reject anything over Zero
  • Almost impossible to clean last seed out of equipment and facilities
communication has begun
COMMUNICATION HAS BEGUN
  • Organic producers, breeders, North Dakota Seedstock Program, organic certifiers, Northern Plains Sustainable Agriculture Society and Extension have begun communicating on this issue
farmers breeding club project
FARMERS BREEDING CLUB PROJECT
  • Northern Plains Sustainable Agriculture Society (NPSAS) has started training farmers to make seed selections
  • Goal is to develop alternative seed system
  • Project is under funded at this point
educational sessions
EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS
  • NPSAS and other organic organizations are providing training sessions for farmers
  • Certification groups are developing procedures to try to reduce risk
  • Resolutions have been drafted on transgenic crops by NPSAS
  • Organic community is organizing
starting with clean seed
STARTING WITH CLEAN SEED
  • Buy organically grown seed when possible
  • Test every lot of seed before your buy for contamination
seperation by timing of planting
SEPERATION BY TIMING OF PLANTING
  • Planting organic corn later then GMO corn
    • goal is to try and get 5 to 10 day difference in bloom
diligence through distance
DILIGENCE THROUGH DISTANCE
  • Organic farmers consult with conventional neighbors
    • put organic production as far away as possible from transgenic fields
    • separate far enough so bees should not carry pollen between fields
facility and equipment contamination
FACILITY AND EQUIPMENT CONTAMINATION
  • Producers are trying to use equipment and facilities that have never had transgenic products in them
  • Clean out affidavits on other items being used
keep in touch with certifiers
KEEP IN TOUCH WITH CERTIFIERS
  • Certification organizations are developing standards and protocols
  • You need to know what is required of you
summary
SUMMARY
  • Communication
  • Diligence
  • Stay informed
solutions
SOLUTIONS????
  • Communications
  • Coexistence working group
    • Identify issues
    • Gather information
    • Make recommendations
    • Disseminate findings
objectives of working group
OBJECTIVES OF WORKING GROUP
  • Identify issues
  • Gather information
  • Promote understanding between systems
  • Develop BMPs
  • Education
history
HISTORY
  • Pilot group
    • 2 meetings 2001
    • Original organic groups, NDSU and state personnel
    • Decided to include all stakeholders and write grant
  • SARE grant
group members
GROUP MEMBERS
  • Farmers
    • Organic
    • Conventional
    • IP
    • Biotech
group members25
GROUP MEMBERS
  • University
  • ND Depts.
  • Biotech industry
  • Organic groups
order of business
ORDER OF BUSINESS
  • Id issues
  • Gather information
  • Make decisions
  • Disseminate decisons
issues identified
ISSUES IDENTIFIED
  • Liability
    • Where does it lie for U.P.
      • Farmers, industry, NDSU
    • Genetic drift (UP)
    • Commingling
land grant research funding
LAND GRANT RESEARCH FUNDING
  • Public crop variety research and development
  • NDSU mission relating to germplasm maintance and varietal development
  • Relationship to private companies
segreagation purity
SEGREAGATION/PURITY
  • Segregation
    • Can it be done and if so how?
  • Purity
    • How do we keep things separate
  • Monitoring
tolerance
TOLERANCE
  • What is acceptable?
    • Market requirements
    • NOP
  • Is zero realistic?
  • Sampling
  • Testing
germplasm
GERMPLASM
  • Who has the right of access
  • Multiple systems for plant development
  • Access to and development of non-transgenic seed
  • Long term storage viability of germplasm base
germplasm32
Germplasm
  • Implications of patented varieties
  • Consolidation in the seed industry
standards
STANDARDS
  • Protocols for research and development of seed increase
  • Protocols for commercial seed production
  • Education of growers
consequences
CONSEQUENCES
  • Cost /benefit of current commercial transgenic crops
  • Future transgenic development
  • IP infrastructure for added value and rural development
neighbors
NEIGHBORS
  • Need for farmer education and communication
  • Isolation buffers/responsibilities
consumer concerns
CONSUMER CONCERNS
  • Consumer perceptions, attitudes and education
  • Labeling costs and benefits

Consumer choice

Food feed and environment

requirements
REQUIREMENTS
  • Decision process on commercialization of transgenic crops
slide38
This material is based upon work supported by the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, under Cooperative Agreement number 2000-38640-11923
slide39
“Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.”