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Construct a Leakproof Mold

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  1. Construct a Leakproof Mold Mary Biediger John Marshall High School – NISD Dr. Duncan Maitland, Biomedical Device Laboratory

  2. In the lab • The focus of the research is stroke prevention and treatment. • The devices being developed are made of shape memory polymers • The engineering in the lab runs the gamut for engineering disciplines

  3. Preliminary Activity - research • Define - aneurysm • Formal Definition • Plain terminology description • Find statistics – cases per year (USA) • Identify known risk factors • Identify some symptoms and warning signs • Identify family members/close friends who have been diagnosed.

  4. First Class day (of five) • Groups assigned – 3 or 4 students per group • Small group discussion – share information, solidify understanding of the disease • Task – students are given model of an actual size aneurysm with parent vessel • Begin discussion - how to construct a mold that can be cast to fit the aneurysm model

  5. Materials required • Composition notebook – 1 per group • All sketches, plans, specifications will be done in the notebook • A summary of the group’s progress will be recorded here (each day they work on the project) • Any problems they encounter in the project will be recorded here • Actual size aneurysm model (made of modeling clay) • Pencils, ruler, eraser

  6. Output – day 1 • Group definition of aneurysm • Compiled data • Compiled list of risk factors • Compiled list of symptoms • General sketches of the design

  7. Second Class Day (of Five) • Materials selection (samples provided) • Cardboard sheets (by the square foot) • Polystyrene material (by the square 9”x9”) • Meat packaging trays (by the square 6”x 6”) • Packing tape (by the inch) • Aluminum tape (by the inch) • String (by the foot) • Popsicle sticks (per each) • Toothpicks (per each) • Gelatin (by the milliliter) • Budget

  8. Materials Required • Samples of each material provided • This day is planning/decision making ONLY

  9. Output – Day 2 • Record group decisions about materials to use in the notebook • Include quantities • Calculate total estimated cost (must be under budget) in notebook

  10. Third Class Day (of five) • Purchase materials • Construct the container

  11. MaTERIALSrEQUIRED • Cardboard sheets (by the square foot) • Polystyrene take-out container material (by the square 9”x9”) • Meat packaging trays (by the square 6”x 6”) • Packing tape (by the inch) • Aluminum tape (by the inch) • String (by the foot) • Popsicle sticks (per each) • Toothpicks (per each)

  12. Output – Day 3 • Completed mold • 3D sketch of mold in notebook (with dimensions labeled) • Net sketch of mold (with dimensions labeled) • Notes about difficulties, discussion, etc. • Predict effectiveness

  13. Fourth Day of class (of five) • Pour the gelatin in the mold • Check for leaks • Redesign if necessary • Leave to set

  14. Materials required • Gelatin (prepared) • Plastic tubs/trays

  15. Output – Day 4 • Mold cast • Notebook record – • What problems did you find with your mold? • How can you fix it? • Redesign – Sketches + construct

  16. Fifth day of class (of five) • Communicate the solution • Present product (5 minutes per group) • Disclose problems encountered and solutions devised • Explain what they would do differently if they could redesign again

  17. Main goals • Give students an opportunity to design an object that satisfies some specification • Work collaboratively • Make decisions • Experience the engineering design process • TAKS objective – 6, 7, 8, and 10 • Geometric relationships and spatial reasoning • Understanding 2 and 3 dimensional shapes • Understand the concept of measurement and similarity • Mathematical processes

  18. Auxiliary GOals • Develop awareness of aneurysms • Identify symptoms • Learn about current treatment options • Determine familial connections to this condition

  19. 2nd project – dip coating • Pretzels and melted chocolate • Measure diameter after each dip • Predict next diameter after each dip • Plot data on graph • Determine function and write model

  20. 2nd project - objectives • Main Objectives • Measure diameter of circle • Determine thickness of tube • Generate and plot data • Identify parent function • Write model • Test model • Auxiliary Objectives • Learn about a biomedical device – stent • Make a fun snack 

  21. Precalculus TEKS • (P.1)  The student defines functions, describes characteristics of functions, and translates among verbal, numerical, graphical, and symbolic representations of functions, including polynomial, … exponential, … and piecewise-defined functions. • The student is expected to: • (A)  describe parent functions symbolically and graphically, including f(x) = xn, … f(x) = ex, … • (B)  determine the domain and range of functions using graphs, tables, and symbols;

  22. TeKS continued • (P.2)  The student interprets the meaning of the symbolic representations of functions and operations on functions to solve meaningful problems. • The student is expected to: • (A)  apply basic transformations, including a • f(x), f(x) + d, f(x - c), f(b • x), …, to the parent functions;

  23. TEKS continued • (P.3)  The student uses functions and their properties, tools and technology, to model and solve meaningful problems. • The student is expected to: • (B)  use functions such as logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, polynomial, etc. to model real-life data; • (C)  use regression to determine the appropriateness of a linear function to model real-life data (including using technology to determine the correlation coefficient); • (D)  use properties of functions to analyze and solve problems and make predictions; and

  24. Pre/Post Test Sample

  25. Thank you! This has been a very rewarding experience that will pay dividends in my students for years to come. • John Horn – Graduate student who served as my mentor • Dorothy Ringer Sumner – my partner for being a sounding board and exchanging ideas • Dr. Duncan Maitland for allowing me access to his lab to learn about engineering • Matthew Parioythorn, Dr. Robin Autenrieth, Dr. Cheryl Page, Dr. ArunSrinivasa, AshwinRao for organizing the program and giving teachers access to this invaluable experience • NSF, NPI, and TWC for funding this experience • My 2011 E3 cohort, within which I’ve found many intriguing personalities and friends from around the state.