Let s start with maps what do you know
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Let’s start with Maps – what do you know?. An Introduction to Geography at Ballakermeen. Contents. What are maps? Standard OS maps What is your view of the Earth? Where is the EU? Do you know the British Isles? Exploring the UK Summary activities. The key concepts covered are:

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Let s start with maps what do you know
Let’s start with Maps – what do you know?

An Introduction to Geography at Ballakermeen


Contents
Contents

  • What are maps?

  • Standard OS maps

  • What is your view of the Earth?

  • Where is the EU?

  • Do you know the British Isles?

  • Exploring the UK

  • Summary activities

The key concepts covered are:

Place, Space, Scale and Physical and human processes


What are maps
What are maps?

What are maps?

By the end of this section, you will:

  • Know what a map is and why it is used.

  • Understand some of the basic rules that must be followed when making a map.

  • Be able to identify some basic map symbols.


What are maps1
What are maps?

A map is a two dimensional drawing or picture of an area.

Maps can be seen in a variety of different forms:

  • a simple sketch of the street on which you live

  • a complex Ordnance Survey map of a particular area of land

  • a fully comprehensive representation of the Earth.

Throughout history, maps have been essential to help us understand more about our surroundings.


Why are maps useful
Why are maps useful?

Maps can help you plan your route.

You are more likely to arrive at your destination quickly and safely if you use a map.

Maps can help you visualize what a place looks like so you will know what to expect when you get there.

What information must a map contain in order for it to make sense?


Map rules
Map rules

There is certain information that must always be incorporated into a map so that the users can make sense of it.

  • A title must be given that shows what the map represents.

  • A compass displaying a north sign should be included to help users find their bearings.

  • A scale is used to indicate how far apart places and things are.

  • A key is essential to explain what the symbols that are included on the map actually mean.



Standard os maps
Standard OS maps

Standard OS maps

By the end of this section, you will:

  • Know the features of a standard OS map.

  • Understand how relief is shown on an OS map.

  • Be able to use four figure and six figure grid references.


Ordnance survey
Ordnance survey

Ordnance Survey (OS) is Britain’s national mapping agency.

They produce most of the commonly used maps and map data for the British Isles.

What map features tell you what the land is like?

N

What map features would help you navigate?

Scale 1:50 000

1km


Ordnance survey1
Ordnance survey

OS maps contain:

  • symbols and place names

  • contour lines and spot heights

  • a scale

  • grid references and grid lines

  • orientation

N

Scale 1:50 000

1km



How is relief shown on a map
How is relief shown on a map?

Relief is shown on maps in three main ways:

  • contour lines

  • spot heights

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32

37

31

40

46

21

30

14

20

10

12

  • colour shading.

10-20m

21-30m

31-40m

41-50m


Contours
Contours

Relief is often shown on OS maps by light brown/orange lines known as contour lines.

Contours are lines that join points of equal height.

Contour linesusually have a number attached to them. This number indicates the height of the land above sea-level.



Grid references
Grid references

Areas on maps can be identified with a grid reference. For example the highlighted square has the grid reference 0231.

34

The first two digit number is the easting. This is the number at the top or bottom of a map.

The second two digit number is

the northing. This is the number at the side of a map.

33

32

31

30

00

01

02

03

04

A grid reference is a set of two numbers, the easting and the northing.


Finding a grid reference
Finding a grid reference

How would you find the grid reference of square 0231?

34

  • Find the easting by placing your finger on the 02 line at the bottom.

  • Find the northing by placing a second finger on the 31 line at the side.

  • Draw your fingers along the lines until they meet.

33

32

31

The square is North-east of the point where they meet.

30

00

01

02

03

04



Six figure grid references
Six figure grid references

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Sometimes we need to be specific about the location of a place.

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Six figure grid references help us be more exact.

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31

024 315 is the six figure grid reference of the church in grid square 02 31.

30

00

01

02

03

04

What do the extra numbers mean in 024 315?


Finding a six figure grid reference
Finding a six figure grid reference

How would you find the grid reference 024 315?

  • Use the first two digits of each three digit number to find the four figure reference, 024 315.

  • Imagine the square, 02 31, is divided into tenths vertically and horizontally.

  • Use the last digit of each three digit number, 024 315 to estimate lines at 4 tenths across the square and 5 tenths up the square.

  • 024 315 is the point where the imaginary lines cross.

32

5

31

4

02

03