Who are KU’s Students? Dan Bernstein Psychology and CTE - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  1. Who are KU’s Students?Dan BernsteinPsychology and CTE

  2. Who are KU’s Students? • KU Student Demographics • Student Expectations • Intellectual Development • What KU Students are not

  3. KU Students • 20,822 undergraduates, 5,206 graduate students • 50.4% female; 49.6% male; • 69.6% from KS; 30.4% from out-of-state from every state in the US; • 5,796 of US students self-identify as minority (Af-Am, Asian-Am, Native Am, Hispanic) – 21.6% of student body; • 79.6% fulltime students, 20.4% part-time; • 26.2% study abroad

  4. What do students expect? • Time spent on school work • Measures of successful outcome (grades) • Intellectual content and challenge

  5. Time is an issue for all • More students work for money (47%) • Data show average effort is 10-12 hr/week • Only 34% study more than 6 hr/week • 74% plan graduate or professional school • University policy allows 2 hrs preparation outside of class for every hour in class • As a profession, we have let this relation slip

  6. Simple Analysis - 168 hr / week

  7. Grade expectations high • Despite repeated low effort, students have a history of success • 1966 - 15% had A average in high school • 2003 - 48% had A average in high school • 60% expect a B average in college (up from 27% 30 years ago) • Connect success to effort and quality

  8. So do these expectations effect your grading? • Using a curve grading system: • Strengths • Weaknesses

  9. Intellectual Development • What kind of knowledge have undergraduates acquired most often? • Integration of facts into principles • Evaluation of conceptual explanations • Specific facts and information • Application of principles to particular cases

  10. College is not very demanding • Faculty talk about critical thinking (Semb) • Most measures are in the bottom two of Bloom’s Taxonomy

  11. Bloom’s basic skills

  12. More complex skills

  13. Using Bloom’s Taxonomy in your Classes • Remembering:“Who is the author of "Das Kapital"? • Application: “Which one of the following memory systems does a piano-tuner mainly use in his occupation?” • Echoic memory • Short-term memory • Long-term memory • Mono-auditory memory • None of the above.

  14. Using Bloom’s Taxonomy in your Classes • Evaluation: Judge the sentence in italics according to the criteria given below: ”The United States took part in the Gulf War BECAUSE of the lack of civil liberties imposed on the Kurds by Saddam Hussein's regime." a. The assertion and the reason are both correct, and the reason is valid. b. The assertion and the reason are both correct, but the reason is invalid. c. The assertion is correct but the reason is incorrect. d. The assertion is incorrect but the reason is correct.

  15. What sources of knowledge do most students believe underlie what they learn in class? • Knowledge is relative so all positions are equally valid • Authority of expert research • Knowledge comes from reflection on relative merits of evidence

  16. Students’ Level of Intellectual Development • Many students report disappointment • Not challenging enough • Need to be clear about your goals • How can you improve students’ levels of intellectual development? • Plan what you want them to do • Give practice at the level you expect

  17. Example: Scaffolding Intellectual Development • GOAL: Independent analysis of a complex issue • IMPLEMENT: • Practice assignments • Feedback • Multiple components and attempts • Reflection

  18. Who KU Students are NOT: 1) Potential dating partners • See Consentual Relations brochure that you received from the Provost for more information

  19. Who KU Students are NOT: 2) Individuals about whom you may share personal information • Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) • Tips for handling student records provided in folders

  20. What if your students are having trouble in your classes? • You, as a graduate student, are NOT the normal college student • Use campus resources • Library Staff • Writing Center • Tutoring • Other resources -- meet them this morning

  21. Knowing about your students makes a difference in how you teach -- or at least it should. Questions or Comments? djb@ku.edu www.cte.ku.edu