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  1. St. Mary’s University – May 14 2013 Faculty Institute Teaching Practices for Focusing Learning, Framing Content and Creating Community Judith V. Boettcher, Ph.D. Designing for Learning University of Florida judith@designingforlearning.org Focusing Course Framing Collaborating

  2. The Story of Three, Maybe Four Tips Embracing and customizing learning goals for focusing learning (#73) Creating a Launching and Promising Syllabus (#94) Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Randy Buckner, Ph.D and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging www.humanconnectomeproject.org

  3. The Story of Three, Maybe Four Tips (2) Teaming, Partnering, Peering, Collaborating for Community (#92) Lecturing without Lecturing (#74) Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Randy Buckner, Ph.D and the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging www.humanconnectomeproject.org

  4. Getting Acquainted

  5. Getting Acquainted Searching and sharing of wisdom, love and self… A CATHOLIC AND MARIANIST LIBERAL ARTS INSTITUTION What do you wonder about in your teaching? What do you think about?

  6. Getting Acquainted; Getting Started Purpose — Develop specific goals • Form groups of two or three • Share a question that has been brewing in your head • If you prefer, complete one of these sentences • I wish that I knew how to … • I wonder if there is a better way to … • How can we (collectively) make a change in… • Then one person from group will share with the rest of us • Anther person will track action items for group (3) With Help from Susie

  7. Questions – into Goals Is there a better way to… I wish I knew how to… I worry about… It would be great if only…

  8. Tip 73 – Developing Explicit and Personal Learning Goals (1) Tip 73 – Make learning goals meaningful and relevant to learners … “When I finish this course, this is how I will be different…This is how I want my time and effort to make a difference in my life. “

  9. Tip 73 – Developing Explicit and Personal Learning Goals (2) Strategy #1 – Create an assignment, activity around personalizing and customizing goals. Strategy #2 – Use course projects so learner can pursue customized area of interest and purpose. Strategy #3 – Translate learning goals into family and coffee conversation…

  10. Tip 73 – Developing Explicit and Personal Learning Goals (3) • Begins to prepare the head, the brain, tap into your learners’ existing knowledge structures • A quick way to get a sense of your students’ readiness for the content, their zones of proximal development, ala Vygotsky and zone of proximal development • Begins to build connections, relationships with what learners already know • Establishes purpose • Helps learners get ready to answer the question, “What is my next step?” (David Allen, getting things done (GTD), stress-free productivity) • Provides an intro to what might might be an overwhelming new topic for learners, makes its “do-able” Why this makes sense for learning…

  11. Tip 73 Discussion – Setting Personal Goals • When would be a good time in your course to do this? • Can you make time for this activity? • How do you think your students will respond? • Ideas for enhancing this activity?

  12. Tip 94 – Creating a Syllabus That Jumpstarts Learning (1) Tip 94 – Make your syllabus an exciting entry point into your course. Think movie trailer! A brochure of coming events! An overview of upcoming learning experiences… “ Where is all the information on our assignments? Our readings? Oh, in the syllabus, where is that again? “

  13. Tip 94 Creating a Syllabus That Jumpstarts Learning (2) Strategy #1 – Create a graphic that “frames” the course content, sets boundaries, provides “birds-eye view” Strategy #2 – Use pictures, use people, suggest, hint at stories and cases, unanswered questions Strategy #3 – “Talk” to your students as if you were right there with them… get them excited, share your enthusiasm with your expertise

  14. US History - Tona Hangen (1) http://www.tonahangen.com/wsc/us2/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/112.Spr11.pdf

  15. US History Syllabus Tona Hangen (2) http://www.tonahangen.com/wsc/us2/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/112.Spr11.pdf

  16. US History Syllabus Tona Hangen (3) “It is entirely possible to do well in the class without being transformed by your newfound historical knowledge, but it would be a darn shame.” Tona Hangen 2011 http://www.tonahangen.com/wsc/us2/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/112.Spr11.pdf

  17. Tip 94 Creating a Syllabus That Jumpstarts Learning (3) • Well, yes… it is, but it is worth it • Similar to writing out a lecture, creating a script, preparing a presentation • Creating a concept map /graphic overview requires deep processing of your course content • A concept map helps them create lasting “worlds of content” in their knowledge structures • Ask yourself, “How can I create/share a sense of purpose, clarity, excitement? “ • One great benefit of concept maps – you make patterns, relationships explicit that help to chunk content and develop skill in the discipline • How would I do this? Start small… This looks like a lot of work… What might a first step for you be?

  18. Tip 94 Discussion – Refreshing Your Syllabus • What one change might you make in your next term? • Do you need help? Time? A friend? A tool? A camera?

  19. Tip 92 Collaborating with Groups of Two, Three or More (1) Tip 92 – Build connections between learners to add a feeling dimension to your course content … “I really liked working with Jacob. When I had to explain my idea out loud, it finally became clear to me.“ Design for peer consulting and brainstorming, but independent and personal work “What do you think of my idea, project?”

  20. “I don’t know what I think until I write it down.” Attributed to Norman Mailer and also to Novelist and essayist Joan Didion The Year of Magical Thinking

  21. Tip 92 Collaborating with Groups of Two, Three or More (2) Strategy #1 – Use “casual grouping” (Fink, 2004) This means informal chats, sharing, and simply gathering to process and talk about the course ideas, events Strategy #2 — Think buddy system, coffee mtgs, study groups. Purpose is to have students use their voices, fingers, hands… Strategy #3 — Form short term, “buzz” groups on specific questions, cases, problems

  22. Tip 92 Collaborating with Groups of Two, Three or More (3) Why is collaborating a good idea? Great for… • Discovering and developing colleagues • Building a life-long network and support system • Hearing your own voice and the voices of others…and the perspectives shared with those voices • Clarify your own thinking; process and think through course content ideas and questions, to explain to others what you think… Do you have a success story?

  23. Tip 92 Discussion – Two, Three Person Dialogues, brainstorming • How will learners respond? • How might this strategy increase dialogue between you and your students?

  24. Tip 74 – Lecturing without Lecturing: Shaping the Content with Your Voice and Knowledge (1) Tip 74 – Share your expertise; create and communicate your teaching presence “But what do you think? You are my expert for this course. I would like to hear what you think and what you think about what I think…”

  25. Tip 74 – Lecturing without Lecturing: Shaping the Content with your Voice and Knowledge (2) Strategy #1 – Your syllabus is your first “lecture.” Strategy #2 — Create short module introductions (video?) Strategy #3 – “Wrap and bridge” Wrap up discussions and create thought bridges to the next topic, activity, readings

  26. Tip 74 – Lecturing without Lecturing: Shaping the Content with your Voice and Knowledge (3) Strategy # 4 Meet in a Live Classroom regularly…once a week, for open Q & A and for debriefings on assignments and for sharing project ideas

  27. Let’s think… • How do you share your enthusiasm for your “intellectual treasures?” For your discipline? • When? • Where? • How? • Props? • Current findings, challenges, disputes • Great stories??

  28. In course design, we design for the probable, expected learner; in course delivery, we flex, we customize to the specific, particular learners within a course. Wrapping up Quote -Very Important “I really enjoyed the project and how my teacher supported me in doing what was important for me personally.”

  29. Sharing of Action ItemsQuestionsThanks So Much