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Effective Teaching/Learning Practices

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  1. Effective Teaching/Learning Practices An Overview

  2. Effective Teaching/ Learning Practices (EP) Overview and Purpose of Effective/ Learning Practices Overview and Purpose of EP Spaced versus Massed Assessment Capable Learners Reciprocal Teaching Feedback

  3. Norms Be Respectful • Be an active listener—open to new ideas • Use notes for side bar conversations Be Responsible • Be on time for sessions • Silence cell phones—reply appropriately Bea Problem Solver • Ask questions as needed to clarify concepts or directions

  4. Pre-Assessment • Turn to pages 5 and 6 of your handout and complete the pre-assessment. * Handout: FINAL Revised Guided Notes with definitions and pre/post Effective Teaching/Learning Practices Overview 06032013

  5. Today’s Outcomes • By the end of the Effective Teaching/Learning Practices Overview, you will be able to: • Define an effective teaching/learning practice and rationale for utilizing effective practices. • Describe four Effective Teaching/Learning Practices and benefits of each. • Understand that each practice aligns with the Missouri Teacher Standards. • Explain how the Effective Teaching/Learning Practices will be implemented at the building, data team, and classroom levels. • Plan key steps to avoid implementation and fidelity drift.

  6. Guided Notes • Guided notes are provided to assist with your note taking throughout this presentation. • This icon in the upper right corner of a slide is a prompt that there is information for your guided notes: Handout: FINAL Revised Guided Notes with definitions and pre/post Effective Teaching/Learning Practices Overview 06032013 *

  7. Today’s Outcomes • By the end of the Effective Teaching/Learning Practices Overview, you will be able to: • Define an effective teaching/learning practice and rationale for utilizing effective practices. • Describe the four Effective Teaching/Learning Practices and benefits of each. • Understand that each practice aligns with the Missouri Teacher Standards. • Explain how the effective practices will be implemented at the building, data team, and classroom levels. • Plan key steps to avoid implementation and fidelity drift.

  8. Definition of Effective Teaching/Learning Practices Effective Teaching/Learning Practices at the classroom level are evidence-basedeffective methods that are not content related and when implemented with fidelityand informed through datacan produce positive, sustained resultsfor every student.

  9. Why Use Effective Teaching/Learning Practices? Research shows that the ways in which teachers promote ways of thinking through teaching practices can enhance students’ information processing, motivation for learning, and cognitive development. Ames & Archer (1988)

  10. Why Use Effective Teaching/Learning Practices? “Helping teachers create an instructional environment that effectively assists students to master their learning and do problem solving is important for early school successes and provides a basis for expanded school demands” (p. 528). For teachers and educators, creating an academic environment based on learning practices is crucial to students’ learning. Mercer &Mercer (1998)

  11. Why Use Effective Teaching/Learning Practices? “To make teaching and learning visible requires an accomplished ‘teacher as evaluator and activator’, who knows a range of learning strategiesto build the students’ surface knowledge, deep knowledge and understanding, and conceptual understanding”(p. 18). Hattie (2012)

  12. In Your Own Words A colleague stops you in the hallway tomorrow morning and asks you what you learned today. You have one minute before going to bus duty. • In your own words, develop a definition of an effective teaching/learning practice and rationale for using effective practices that you can share in less than a minute. • Share your definition and rationale with a partner.

  13. Today’s Outcomes • By the end of the Effective Teaching/Learning Practices Overview, you will be able to: • Define an effective teaching/learning practice and rationale for utilizing effective practices. • Describe the four Effective Teaching/Learning Practices and benefits of each. • Understand that each practice aligns with the Missouri Teacher Standards. • Explain how the effective practices will be implemented at the building, data team, and classroom levels. • Plan key steps to avoid implementation and fidelity drift.

  14. Which Four Effective Teaching/Learning Practices? The four Effective Teaching/Learning Practices for which we have materials and supports are highlighted. Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) Reciprocal Teaching Feedback Spaced vs. Massed Practice

  15. Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) Definition Benefits Hattie Barometer Alignment to Missouri Teacher Standards

  16. Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) Definition Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) is an effective teaching/learning practice and is defined as students regulating and facilitating their own learningby accurately and appropriately answering the following questions: 1)Where am I going?;2) Where am I now?;3) How do I close the gap?. Adapted from S. Brookhart, (2012); J. Chappuis (2009); J. Hattie (2012), and J. Atkin, P. Black, &J. Coffey, (2001).

  17. Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) Definition (cont.) Students have a clear understanding of the learning target; know where they are relative to mastery of the target based on descriptive feedback; set and monitor their own achievement goals; and know how they can revise or refine their performance to achieve that target. Adapted from S. Brookhart, (2012); J. Chappuis (2009); J. Hattie (2012), and J. Atkin, P. Black, &J. Coffey, (2001).

  18. Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) Benefits A very efficient way to estimate students' knowledge gain is simply to ask students to rate how much they have learned in a given lesson or a set of lessons . . . . . Student self-reports on their learning is an easy and apparently legitimate way to obtain information in the course of walkthroughs or instructional rounds regarding student achievement within the context of a specific lesson or set of lessons.” Marzano, R. J. (2009)

  19. Assessment-Capable Learners(Self-Reported Grades)6 meta-analyses, 209 studies, Rank 1st (Self-Reported Grades)(1.44 effect size) Hattie, J. (2009). Visible Learning. New York: Routledge Hattie, J. (2012). Visible Learning for Teaachers. New York: Routledge

  20. Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) and Missouri Teacher Standards Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) aligns with the following Missouri Teacher Standards: Standard 2, Quality Indicator 2 Standard 6, Quality Indicator 4 Standard 7, Quality Indicators 2 & 3

  21. Assessment-Capable Learners (Self-Reported Grades) and Missouri Teacher Standards Standard 2: Student Learning, Growth and Development 2.2: Student Goals Standard 6: Effective Communication 6.4: Technology and media communication tools Standard 7: Student Assessment and Data Analysis 7.2: Assessment data to improve learning 7.3: Student-led assessment strategies

  22. Reciprocal Teaching Definition Benefits Hattie Barometer Alignment to Missouri Teacher Standards

  23. Reciprocal Teaching Definition Reciprocal Teaching is an effective teaching/learning practice and is defined as students summarizing, questioning, clarifying, and predicting; they take turns being the teacher.

  24. Reciprocal Teaching Benefit “Reciprocal teaching (RT) is an instructional procedure developed by Palincsar and Brown (1984) to improve students’ text comprehension skills through scaffolded instruction of four comprehension-fostering and comprehension-monitoring strategies(Palincsar & Brown, 1984; Palincsar, David, & Brown, 1989; Rosenshine & Meister, 1994), that is, (a) generating one’s own questions, (b) summarizing parts of the text,(c) clarifying word meanings and confusing text passages,and (d) predicting what might come next in the text.” Spörer, N., Brunstein, J. C., & Kieschke, U. (2009)

  25. Reciprocal Teaching2 meta-analyses, 38 studies, Rank 9th (Self-Reported Grades)(.74 effect size)

  26. Reciprocal Teaching and Missouri Teacher Standards Reciprocal Teaching aligns with the following Missouri Teacher Standards: Standard 1, Quality Indicators 1 & 4 Standard 4, Quality Indicator 3 Standard 6, Quality Indicators 3 & 4 Standard 7, Quality Indicator3

  27. Reciprocal Teaching and Missouri Teacher Standards Standard 1: Content knowledge aligned with appropriate instruction. 1.1: Content knowledge and academic language 1.4: Interdisciplinary instruction Standard 4:Teaching for Critical Thinking 4.3: Cooperative, small group and independent learning Standard 6: Effective Communication 6.3: Learner expression in speaking, writing and other media 6.4: Technology and media communication tools Standard 7: Student Assessment and Data Analysis 7.3 Student-led assessment strategies

  28. Feedback Definition Benefits Hattie Barometer Alignment to Missouri Teacher Standards

  29. Feedback Definition Feedback is an effective teaching/learning practice and is defined as an integral aspect of instruction and learning utilizing information provided by an agent (e.g. teacher, peer, book, parent, self/experience, computer) regarding aspects of one’s performance or understanding. The main purpose of feedback is to reduce discrepancies between current understanding or performance andsome desired level of performance or goal.

  30. Feedback includes feedback to students as well as FROM students in terms of what students know, what they understand, and when they have misconceptions. Feedback is essential to Visible Learning which, according to Hattie, occurs “When teachers SEE learning through the eyes of the student AND when students SEE themselves as their own teachers.” visiblelearningplus.com

  31. Feedback Benefit “. . . the main purpose of feedback to be to reduce discrepancies between current understanding or performance and some desired level of performance or goal.” Voerman, L., Meijer, P. C., Korthagen, F. A., & Simons, R. J. (2012)

  32. Feedback23 meta-analyses, 1287 studies, Rank 10th (Self-Reported Grades)(.73 effect size)

  33. Feedback and Missouri Teacher Standards Feedback aligns with the following Missouri Teacher Standards: Standard 1, Quality Indicator 2 Standard 2, Quality Indicators 2 & 5 Standard 6, Quality Indicators 2 & 4 Standard 7, Quality Indicators 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5

  34. Feedback and Missouri Teacher Standards Standard 1: Content knowledge aligned with appropriate instruction. 1.2: Student engagement in subject matter Standard 2: Student Learning, Growth and Development 2.2: Student goals 2.5: Prior experiences, learning styles, multiple intelligences, strengths and needs Standard 6: Effective Communication 6.2: Sensitivity to culture, gender, intellectual and physical differences 6.4: Technology and media communication tools Standard 7: Student Assessment and Data Analysis 7.1: Effective use of assessments 7.2: Assessment data to improve learning 7.3: Student-led assessment strategies 7.4: Effect of instruction on individual/class learning 7.5: Communication of student progress and maintaining records

  35. Spaced vs. Massed Practice Definition Description/Rationale Hattie Barometer Alignment to Missouri Teacher Standards

  36. Spaced vs. Massed Practice Definition Spaced vs. Massed Practice is an effective teaching/learning practice and is defined as spacedpracticebeing those conditions in which individuals are given rest intervals within the practice session and massedpracticebeing those conditions in which individuals practice a task continuously without rest. Adapted from J. Donovan & D. Radosevich (1999).

  37. Spaced vs. Massed Practice Benefit “Repetition of information improves learning and memory. No surprise there. However, how information is repeated determines the amount of improvement. If information is repeated back to back (massed or blocked presentation), it is often learned quickly but not very securely (i.e., the knowledge fades fast). If information is repeated in a distributed fashion or spaced over time, it is learned more slowly but is retained for much longer. Roediger III, H. L., & Pyc, M. A. (2012)

  38. Spaced vs. Massed Practice2 meta-analyses, 63 studies, Rank 12th (Self-Reported Grades)(.71 effect size)

  39. Spaced vs. Massed Practice and Missouri Teacher Standards Spaced vs. Massed Practice aligns with the following Missouri Teacher Standards: Standard 1, Quality Indicator 2 Standard 2, Quality Indicator 3 Standard 6, Quality Indicator 4

  40. Spaced vs. Massed Practice and Missouri Teacher Standards Standard 1: Content knowledge aligned with appropriate instruction. 1.2: Student engagement in subject matter Standard 2: Student Learning, Growth and Development 2.3: Theory of learning Standard 6: Effective Communication 6.4: Technology and media communication tools

  41. Which Practice? • This practice has an effect size of 0.71 and refers to how a teacher schedules practice of new learning for maximum retention. • In this practice, student comprehension is increased through summarizing, questioning, clarifying, and predicting. The students take turns being the teacher. • This practice is literally “off the scale” with effect size; students regulate and facilitate their own learning. • This practice helps students understand their current performance in relationship to a desired level of performance.

  42. Today’s Outcomes • By the end of the Effective Teaching/Learning Practice Overview, you will be able to: • Define an effective teaching/learning practice and rationale for utilizing effective practices. • Describe the four Effective Teaching/Learning Practices and benefits of each. • Understand that each practice aligns with the Missouri Teacher Standards. • Explain how the effective practices will be implemented at the building, data team, and classroom levels. • Plan key steps to avoid implementation and fidelity drift.

  43. Effective Teaching/Learning Practice Building, Data Team, and Classroom Implementation

  44. “The teacher must know when learning is correct or incorrect; learn when to experiment and learn from the experience; learn to monitor, seek and give feedback; and know to try alternative learning strategies when others do not work” (p. 25). Hattie (2009)

  45. Each Grade Level Team or Teacher Will: • Identify a content area of English Language Arts or Mathematics to focus their attention and to report progress. • Select one or two Effective Teaching/Learning Practice(s) for the year that all teachers will agree to start using.

  46. The Teacher Will: • Select the appropriate teaching/learning practice that meets the instructional needs of all students in his/her classroom based on data. • Demonstrate proficiency (knowledge and skills) to implement the selected teaching/learning practice. • Implement the selected teaching/learning practice with fidelity. • Monitor learning and make changes to the teaching/learning practice as needed.

  47. Teacher/Classroom Level • What data will teachers use to select the instructional practice for their classrooms? • How will you know: • that teachers have proficiency in the instructional practice? • that the instructional practice is implemented with fidelity? • that appropriate changes are made based on data?

  48. Today’s Outcomes • By the end of the Effective Teaching/Learning Practices Overview, you will be able to: • Define an effective teaching/learning practice and rationale for utilizing effective practices. • Describe the four Effective Teaching/Learning Practices and benefits of each. • Understand that each practice aligns with the Missouri Teacher Standards. • Explain how the effective practices will be implemented at the building, data team, and classroom levels. • Plan key steps to avoid implementation and fidelity drift.

  49. Effective Teaching/Learning Practices Avoiding Implementation and Fidelity Drift