Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Session 1 August 24 th , 2012 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

tracen
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Session 1 August 24 th , 2012 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Session 1 August 24 th , 2012

play fullscreen
1 / 63
Download Presentation
Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Session 1 August 24 th , 2012
114 Views
Download Presentation

Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Session 1 August 24 th , 2012

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Session 1 August 24th, 2012 Welcome Back!

  2. “Homeplay” • Practice collecting evidence of “engaged learners.” (if you were still observing instruction) • Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion. • Identify the presence or absence of “engaged learners” in your current observation tool.

  3. Your goals and questions…

  4. Questions everyone in the room should be able to answer about engaged learners… • What would be evidence of “engaged learning?” • What are the attributes of engaged learning? • How many students should be engaged?

  5. Some of your goals… • I want to incorporate what I have learned about engagement into my observations. • Encourage teachers to refocus on engaging all learners. • Conduct walkthroughs looking for engaged students. • Help teachers design lessons to maximize student engagement. • Be more consistent with the identification of engaged learning.

  6. Today’s Outcomes: • Explain the difference between current practice and evidence based observation • Identify and define criteria for effective instruction around which evidence collection will be focused • Describe strategies that a district could employ to increase the quality of evaluations and the agreement of evaluators.

  7. Continuum of Engagement OCCASIONAL TEACHER DIRECTED PARTICIPATION TEACHER ONLY SIMULTANEOUS ACTIVE PARTICIPATION OPTIONAL STUDENT PARTICIPATION

  8. Ready for more practice?

  9. 4th grade Science Lesson • Students will be able to: • identify the components of a series circuit connection • compare the components of a series circuit with the components of a circuit connection

  10. Evidence Collected: T “Last week, can you tell me what you were building?” “What did we build with a bulb? What did we call it when we had some components?” S “a circuit.” T “What were the components in a circuit that you built?” “Eric?”

  11. Evidence Collected: T “What do you think these poles represent?” Ss “North and South”. T “Here’s the challenge for today, can you get two bulbs to light at the same time?” All students took out a graphic organizer. Students were seated in quads. The “getters” collected materials for each group. All students were building circuits to test their predictions.

  12. What does it mean when we say “Teach to an Outcome”?

  13. Rubrics….. • What does your piece of a particular rubric say about “teaching to an outcome?” • Be ready to share.

  14. Rubric Work…Teach to an Outcome • Pink: Danielson’s Framework for Teaching (ASCD) • Orange: Danielson (2011 Revised Edition) • Tan: Marshall’s Teacher Evaluation Rubric • Green: Marzano’s Causal Teacher Evaluation • Blue: NYSTCE Framework for the Observation of Effective Teaching (Pearson) • White: NYSUT’s Teacher Practice Rubric • Purple: Thoughtful Classroom Teacher Effectiveness (Silver Strong & Associates)

  15. What does it mean when we say “Teach to an Outcome”? • The objective of the lesson is clear to the students (Shift from “What do I want them to do today?” to “What do I want them to learn today?”) • All classroom activities are aligned with the objective

  16. Time is used efficiently to get to the learning objective

  17. Learning Objectives What? • Objectives state what students are expected to learn in that lesson. • Objectives begin with VERBS that identify the level of thinking required in the lesson.

  18. Learning Objectives Why? • Instructional objectives narrow what students focus on in the lesson and help the teacher keep activities, questions and responses to student’s aligned.

  19. Learning Objectives • Identify and explain the function of each of the organelles in an animal cell. • Use order of operations to solve these two problems. • Describe strategies that a district could employ to increase the quality of evaluations and the agreement of evaluators

  20. Video: 6th Grade Math Outcomes: Students will be able to: • Calculate unit priceby dividing the price of the product by the number of units • Compare unit prices to determine the “best deal” • Explain the mathematical thinking behind what makes it the “best deal”

  21. Video

  22. Evidence Collected: “What is the unit price?” was posted on the interactive white board. T “Today we are going to learn about unit price. What is unit price?” T“Unit price is how much it costs for each unit.” “How do you find unit price?” was displayed on the white board.

  23. Evidence Collected: T “Make sure your decimals are in the right place.” The teacher held up two boxes of cereal—different size boxes. T “You aren’t looking for the better deal, you are looking for the better price.” One student worked on the white board solving 420 divided by 5.

  24. The Keys to Teach to an Outcome

  25. What qualifies as “evidence” for “teach to an outcome”? • Quotations from the teacher • Examples/models • Descriptions of activities in which the students are engaged • Student quotes

  26. More Practice with TTO SWBAT identify how a writer narrows their focus while writing

  27. Collection of Evidence T “Today I want to talk to you about what writers do to narrow their focus.” T used a visual of a pizza/pizza slices to illustrate “narrowing the focus”. Defend WHY you called this evidence of TTO: T “Did I stick to my focus? Is it about my grandmother’s swing and being on that swing—that special time with her?” T “In a few minutes I’m going to ask you to talk to each other and decide if your story is narrowed or if you need to do some more narrowing.” Ss buddy shared.

  28. Collection of Evidence What did you collect? Defend WHY you called this evidence of TTO: The teacher stated to the class, “Narrowing the focus helps us as writers.” She added “narrowing the focus” to the “How Writers Revise” chart posted in the front of the room.

  29. “Homeplay” • Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion • Identify the presence or absence of “teaching to an outcome” in your current observation tool

  30. The Keys to Teach to an Outcome

  31. Thank You! See you August 29th *Submitting Evidence* Feel free to bring computers/electronics

  32. Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training August 29th, 2012 Part 2 – Welcome Back!

  33. “Homeplay” (if you have examples, be prepared to share them) • Practice collecting evidence of “teaching to an outcome”. Describe what has changed for you as an observer as a result of this workshop. • Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion. Describe what you notice about the types of evidence you are collecting. • Identify the presence or absence of “teaching to an outcome” in your current observation tool

  34. Your goals and “keys”…

  35. Keys to Teaching to an Outcome • Make the learning objective clear to the students. • Base the lesson on what it is you want the kids to learn, not do. • Focus on the “bulls eye”/keep focused on the target. • All instruction is focused on the objective of the lesson.

  36. Your Goals: • Practice observing specifically to see if the teacher sets a clear outcome and focuses on it throughout the lesson. • Collect evidence to discuss “teach to an outcome” with the teacher. (Did the activities directly relate to the “target”?) • Help teachers recognize/classify if the objective/lesson activities are congruent.

  37. Today’s Outcomes: • Identify the key attributes of “effective questioning” • Collect evidence of “effective questioning” • Describe multiple ways for collecting evidence of “effective questioning • Classify evidence of “questions” as • Check for understanding • Effective questions • Objectives • Classroom management/procedural

  38. What does it look like and sound like when a teacher uses effective questioning strategies?

  39. Rubric Language (“Proficient”): Marzano: Teacher engages student with explicit decision making, problem solving, experimental inquiry or investigation task that requires them to generate and test hypotheses. Teacher uses wait time. NYSUT: Most of teacher’s questions are open in nature and engage students in deeper thinking and further discussion. Teacher responds to students’ questions/comments. Responses challenge student thinking. • 2011 Danielson: • While the teacher may use some low-level questions, he/she poses questions to promote student thinking and understanding. • Teacher creates a genuine discussion among students, providing adequate time for students to respond, and stepping aside when appropriate. • Teacher successfully engages most students in the discussion, employing a range of strategies to ensure that most students are heard. • Critical Attributes: • Open ended questions • Effective use of wait time

  40. Criteria for Effective Questioning • Congruent (relevant) to the learning • Invitation for ALL students to think • A range of questions are used to extend thinking from a base of knowledge to higher order thinking that is more critical and creative

  41. Continuum of Questioning High Consensus Low Consensus Yes/No - Fact Closed Open

  42. WAIT TIMEWhat is it?Why do it?

  43. Video: 5th Grade Math Lesson Goal: “Have them (the students) have a conceptual idea about division of fractions.” -Bonnie Bushaw

  44. Sample Evidence Collected: “How can I get 1/3 of a muffin? Oh-I saw someone draw a picture. That’ll work. Take a minute to do what you need to do to figure this out.” “Ok. Who can tell me how many muffins with a third muffin serving? What do we have for a 1/3 muffin serving?” S “72” T “Can you prove it?” S “Yes because if you get 1/3 of a muffin, that’s 3 out of one muffin. 24 X 3 is 72.”

  45. Sample Evidence Collected: T “Figure out my 24 muffins and divide them into ¼ muffin servings.” S “You just add 24 to 72 and get 96.” T “She added 24 to 72, the last answer, is that ok?”

  46. Classifying Question Types • What kinds of questions are used for check for understanding? • What kinds of questions are used for effective questions (that lead to the outcome)? • What kinds of questions are used for classroom management/procedural?

  47. Video: Tammy Mendoza, 6th Grade Science “When I heard the city was considering pulling out the sewer line, I thought wouldn’t it be fun to build a model of that and have the kids understand erosion and deposition, but also how it might affect themselves as well as the community.”

  48. Evidence Sample: