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Internment Camps

Internment Camps

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Internment Camps

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  1. Internment Camps By: Rachel Walker, Marc Missera, Emily Goldberg, and Seth Dixon

  2. Time Line • December 7, 1941: Japanese Attack Pearl Harbor. • February 19, 1942:FDR signs Executive Order 9066, which states that Japanese should be interned. • April 1, 1942: The Internment of Japanese begins, mostly on the West Coast.

  3. Going to the Camps • There was little warning before removal. • Forced to sell possessions, land, and homes quickly.

  4. Going to the Camps • Only allowed to bring what they could carry. • Soldiers confiscated any valuables they wanted.

  5. Waiting • While waiting to be sent to the camps, refugees were housed in horse stalls and tents. • Surrounded by guards and barbed wire.

  6. The Camps • Housed in wooden barracks with wood frame and tarpaper as roof. • 20 x 25 feet per family. • Overcrowded.

  7. The Camps • Only furnishings were cots, blankets, and a light bulb. • Communal toilet, bathing, laundry and dining.

  8. Camp Locations • California • Idaho • Utah • Arizona • Wyoming • Colorado • Arkansas • Canada: British Columbia

  9. Civil Rights • 2 Cases: • Hirabayashi v. United States 1943 • Korematsu v. United States 1944

  10. Hirabayashi v. US 1943 • Gordon Kiyoshi Hirabayashi was a University of Washington student. • Convicted of breaking curfew. • Appealed the conviction all the way to the supreme court. • Turning Overruled in U.S. District Court in Seattle.

  11. Korematsu v. US 1944 • Convicted of evading internment camp, but appealed this ruling . • The government submitted false information during the investigation.

  12. Justification for Internment Camps: • The Japanese were a risk to national security. • The Japanese could help signal enemy sabotages.

  13. Justification • The Japanese citizens could become spies. • There was lots of “fifth-column activity” (“enemy in your midst”) amongst the Japanese.

  14. Law Suits • JACL • Wanted each person interned to receive $15,000 and $15 for each day interned. • NCJAR • Wanted individual payments.

  15. Compensation • On April 22, 1988, Congress passed a bill extending a national apology to survivors. • Authorized $687 million dollars of compensation. • Each person got $20,000.

  16. Bibliography • Dudley, William, ed. Japanese American Internment Camps. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven P, Inc., 2002. • World War II History." The National WWII Museum. The National World War II Museum. Web. • http://www.google.com