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Japanese- American Internment Camps during World War II. Vocabulary. Internment-To place in confinement (to shut or keep in), especially in wartime Barracks-A building, or group of buildings used to house military personnel. Map of Internment Camps. How it started.

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Japanese- American Internment Camps during World War II


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Presentation Transcript
vocabulary
Vocabulary
  • Internment-To place in confinement (to shut or keep in), especially in wartime
  • Barracks-A building, or group of buildings used to house military personnel.
how it started
How it started
  • December 7th 1941: Japan attacked Pearl Harbor (a military base in Hawaii). United States was scared of another attack and war hysteria seized the country.
  • February 19th 1942: Executive Order 9066 moved 120,000 Japanese Americans from their homes into internment camps.
  • The US justified their action by claiming there was a danger of Japanese Americans spying for Japan
  • More than 2/3 of those interned were American citizens and 1/2 of them were children.
  • Some family members were separated and put in different camps.
loss of property
Loss of Property
  • Much personal property stored in government warehouses was stolen or lost.
  • Farms and land had to be sold in days at a great loss.
  • Tenant farmers (Issei- so unable to own land) lost farming rights.
what was it like to live there
What was it like to live there?
  • Life in the camps was hard.
  • The families had about 2 days to pack for the camps
  • They were only were allowed to bring what they could carry
  • They were housed in barracks and had to use communal areas for washing, laundry and eating.
how did it end
How did it end?
  • January 1945 : the Public Proclamation 21 became effective in which allowed internees to return to their homes.
  • At the end of the war some remained in the US and rebuilt their lives.
  • Others were unforgiving and returned to Japan.
were the internment camps necessary
Were the internment camps necessary?
  • None of the people interned had ever previously shown disloyalty to the United States.
  • German Americans and Italian Americans were not interned.
  • The 442nd Infantry, comprised primarily of Japanese Americans- most highly decorated.