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Reserve Components - Total Force U.S. Army Civil Affairs U.S. Army Civil Affairs Corps. William R. Berkman 2004 / 2005. William R. Berkman Major General (Retired) Army of the United States. Chief, Army Reserve, DA 1979-1986 Military Executive,

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slide1

Reserve Components - Total ForceU.S. Army Civil AffairsU.S. Army Civil Affairs Corps

William R. Berkman 2004 / 2005

william r berkman major general retired army of the united states
William R. BerkmanMajor General (Retired)Army of the United States
  • Chief,
  • Army Reserve, DA 1979-1986
  • Military Executive,
  • Reserve Forces Policy Board, OSD 1987-1992
  • President EmeritusThe Civil Affairs Association
  • Honorary Chief of Civil Affairs,
  • U.S. Army Civil Affairs Corps (ARS)
military personnel
MILITARY PERSONNEL
  • Active
  • Reserve Components (Selected Reserve Units)
  • Individual Ready Reserve
active components by service thousands
ACTIVE COMPONENTS BY SERVICE(Thousands)
  • Army 480
  • Navy 376
  • Marine Corps 175
  • Air Force 359
  • TOTAL: 1,500(approx.)
selected reserve by service thousands
SELECTED RESERVE BY SERVICE(Thousands)
  • Army National Guard 350 (29%)
  • Army Reserve 206 (17%)Naval Reserve 87 (16%)
  • Marine Reserve 40 (15%)Air National Guard 106 (18%)Air Force Reserve   72 (12%) TOTAL: 870
individual ready reserve irr
INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE (IRR)
  • Consists of vast majority of enlisted members who after completing active or selected reserve enlistment period have a remaining service obligation of 4 years in the IRR (without a training obligation).
  • The IRR represents a manpower pool of previously trained individuals available for recall to active service if needed.
slide8
Memorandum from Secretary of Defenseto Secretaries of the Military Departments, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff et al, August 23, 1973
  • “An integral part of the central purpose of this Department – to build and maintain the necessary forces to deter war and to defend our country – is the Total Force Policy as it pertains to the Guard and Reserve.”

SUBJECT: “READINESS OF THE SELECTED RESERVE”

Total Force Policy – 1

slide9
“It must be clearly understood that implicit in the Total Force Policy… is the fact that the Guard and Reserve forces will be used as the initial and primary augmentation of the Active Forces.”
  •    “Total Force is no longer a ‘concept.’ It is now the Total Force Policy which integrates the Active, Guard and Reserve Forces into a homogeneous whole.”
  • J.R. Schlesinger

Total Force Policy – 2

department of defense policy and guidance the guard and reserve in the total force september 1975
Department of Defense Policy and Guidance: “The Guard and Reserve in the Total Force”September 1975
  • “The ‘Total Force’ includes all the resources available to perform the various national defense missions. It includes U.S. active and reserve (National Guard and Reserve) component forces, civilians, and – in planning for contingency operations – appropriate forces of our allies.”
  • “Total Force planning is not new for the United States; planning to make the reserve components a useful part of the Total Force is as old as the Republic.”

Total Force Policy – 3

slide11
“The Total Force Policy has had significant success in recent years in shaping American military forces. Further progress in the area of the reserves will continue to require that:”
  • “We recognize that the needs of deterrence, peacetime presence, and immediate response demand that major portions of the Force be active.”

Total Force Policy – 4

slide12
   “We identify essential missions within the capabilities of the reserves and within the constraints of the Secretary of Defense planning guidance.”
  • “We assign these missions to the Reserves, and demand good performance. If there is doubt about the Reserves’ capability to perform a mission, that capability should be tested before the mission is assigned.”

Total Force Policy – 5

slide13
   “We continue to provide the reserves with modern equipment, and achieve a reasonable balance between the reserve structure and its equipment so that no forces are maintained for which there is no useful equipment, and no equipment is maintained for which there are no useful forces.”
  • “We place greater responsibility on the active forces for improving training of the reserves.”  

Total Force Policy – 6

slide14
“We integrate the planning and management of active and reserve component forces into a coherent whole.”
  •   “The Total Force Policy was supported in the FY 76-80 five-year Defense program, on which the Defense portion of the FY 76 President’s budget is based. The FY 77-81 Total Force program guidance of the Secretary of Defense will assure further progress toward the Total Force goal.”

Total Force Policy – 7

slide15

Army National Guard and Army Reserve

  •   Army National Guard and Army Reserve units provide essential combat, combat support, and combat service support to the Army.
  • The mission of the Army Guard and Reserve is to provide trained individuals and units that are trained and ready to mobilize and deploy rapidly to assist the Army in projecting land force power.

Source: Reserve Component Programs 2001

Reserve Forces Policy Board, OSD

slide16

Contributions to the ArmyArmy National Guard and Army Reserve

Army National Guard Army Reserve Combined % Unit Type Number UnitsNumber Unitsof Total Army

  • Divisions 0 7 100
  • Chemical Brigades 0 3 100
  • Water Supply Battalions 5 2 100
  • Enemy Prisoner of War Brigades 0 1 100
  • Judge Advocate General Units 0 18 100
  • Public Affairs Units 28 29 82
  • Exercise Divisions 0 5 100
  • Enhanced Separate Brigades 14 0 100
  • Civil Affairs Units 0 36 97
  • Petroleum Support Battalions 20 12 92
  • Medical Brigades 0 6 85
  • Chemical Battalions 1 8 75
  • Transportation Composite Groups 1 4 80
  • Motor Battalions 2 12 78
  • Maintenance Battalions 13 5 71
  • Engineer Battalions (Combat Heavy) 19 14 73
  • Psychological Operations Units 0 31 81
slide17

Contributions to the ArmyArmy National Guard and Army Reserve

Army National Guard Army Reserve Combined % Unit Type Number UnitsNumber Unitsof Total Army

  • Hospitals 0 31 77
  • Medical Groups 0 8 73
  • Engineer Battalions (Combat) 46 25 70
  • Petroleum Groups 0 1 50
  • Corps Support Groups 4 10 75
  • Field Artillery Battalions 100 0 58
  • Air Defense Battalions 19 0 48
  • Terminal Battalions 0 4 50
  • Military Police Battalions 12 19 66
  • Military Police Brigades 2 2 43
  • Medium Helicopter Battalions 3 1 66
  • Infantry Divisions 4 0 80
  • Corps Support Commands 1 1 50
  • Light Infantry Divisions 1 0 20
  • Area Support Groups 8 21 44
  • Attack Helicopter Battalions 13 2 45
  • Aviation Brigades 9 1 24
slide18

Contributions to the ArmyArmy National Guard and Army Reserve

Army National Guard Army Reserve Combined % Unit Type Number UnitsNumber Unitsof Total Army

  • Special Forces Groups 2 0 29
  • Ordinance Battalions 2 2 29
  • Armor Divisions 1 0 33
  • Theater Signal Commands 0 2 66
  • Signal Battalions 26 5 36
  • Army Signal Brigades 3 1 20
  • Infantry Divisions (Mech) 4 0 40
  • Military Intelligence Battalions 16 5 39
  • Armored Cavalry Regiments 1 0 33
  • Air Defense Brigades 1 0 25
  • Engineer Battalions (Topographical) 1 0 25
  • Training Brigades 0 2 25
  • Theatre Army Area Commands 0 2 25
  • Air Traffic Battalions 2 0 40
  • Field Artillery Brigades 17 0 94
  • Infantry Scout Group 1 0 100
  • Aviation Groups 5 0 71
  • Air Traffic Groups 2 0 50
air national guard and air force reserve
Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve
  •   Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve collectively are referred to as the Air Reserve Component.
  • Their units perform a broad range of combat and combat support missions, including air defense of the continental United States, counter-air, interdiction, close air support, strategic and tactical airlift, aerial refueling, space operations, force protection, aero-medical evacuation, aerospace rescue and recovery, and special operations.
air national guard and air force reserve20
Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve
  • The roles and missions of the Air Reserve Component mirror those of the active Air Force, so its members are readily available to augment or supplement the active Air Force when needed.
slide21

Contributions to the Air Force

Air Force National Guard and Air Force Reserve

AIR NATIONAL AIR FORCE COMBINED %

FLYING UNIT GUARDRESERVETOTAL AIR FORCE

  • Weather Reconnaissance 0 10 100
  • Aerial Spraying 0 4 100
  • Fighter Interceptor Force 60 0 100
  • Tactical Airlift 218 104 64
  • Air Rescue/Recovery 25 29 57
  • Aerial Refueling/Strategic Tankers 204 64 55
  • Tactical Air Support 18 33 38
  • Tactical Fighters 477 72 30
  • Strategic Airlift 28 68 27
  • Special Operations 5 12 17
  • Support Aircraft 6 0 4.5
  • Bombers 18 8 21
  • Polar Ski Aircraft 10 0 100
  • Formal Training Unit Fighters 107 0 100

AIRCRAFT

slide22

Contributions to the Air Force

Air Force National Guard and Air Force Reserve

AIR NATIONAL AIR FORCE COMBINED %

FLYING UNIT GUARDRESERVETOTAL AIR FORCE

  • Aeromedical Evacuation 1,293 1,705 83
  • Strategic Airlift (Associate) 0 2,075 44
  • Tanker/Cargo (Associate) 0 474 52
  • Aeromedical Airlift (Associate) 0 36 44
  • AWACS 0 144 8

AIRCREWS

slide23

Contributions to the Air Force

Air Force National Guard and Air Force Reserve

AIR NATIONAL AIR FORCE COMBINED % OFNON - FLYING UNITSGUARDRESERVETOTAL AIR FORCE

  • Space 1 4 5
  • Engineering Installation 19 0 68
  • Aerial Port 27 42 82
  • Combat Communications 45 3 77
  • Aircraft Control & Warning 2 0 100
  • Tactical Control 19 0 68
  • Air Traffic Control 10 0 62
  • Combat Logistics Support Squadrons 0 6 62
  • Civil Engineering 97 43 46
  • Weather 33 0 46
  • Strategic Airlift Maintenance (Associate) 0 7 48
  • Security Forces 85 35 35
  • Medical 89 40 22
  • Communications Flights 88 35 22
  • Intelligence 4 2 4
slide24

The Naval Reserve augments active duty Navy units by providing support to the fleet in day-to-day operations, while simultaneously promoting a flexible crisis-response capability.

The Naval Reserve is integrated into all aspects of naval operations to enhance the Navy’s ability to respond to both peacetime contingencies and major wars.

  • Naval Reserve
contributions to the navy naval reserve
Contributions to the NavyNaval Reserve

NUMBER % OF UNIT TYPE UNITSNAVY

  • Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Units 22 100
  • Logistics Support Squadrons 10 100
  • Naval Embarked Advisory Teams (NEAT) 7 100
  • Mobile Inshore Undersea Warfare Groups 2 100
  • Fighter Composite Squadrons (U.S. Based) 2 100
  • Heavy Logistics Support (C-130) 4 100
  • Mine Countermeasure Support Ship 1 100
  • Expeditionary Support Force 14 93
  • Airborne Mine Countermeasures Helicopters 14 52
  • Mobile Construction Battalions 12 60
  • Intelligence Program 103 48
  • Mobile Diving & Salvage Units 14 60
contributions to the navy naval reserve26
Contributions to the NavyNaval Reserve

NUMBER % OF UNIT TYPE UNITSNAVY

  • Special Boat Units 1 33
  • Fleet Hospitals 4 40
  • Fast Frigates (FFG-7s) 10 27
  • LAMPS MK-1 Anti-Submarine Warfare Squadrons 2 13
  • Naval Special Warfare Units 16 38
  • Mobile Mine Assembly Groups (MOMAG) 11 50
  • Explosive Ordinance Disposal Units 4 33
  • Carrier Air Wings 1 9
  • Maritime Patrol Squadrons 8 35
  • Helicopter Warfare Support Squadrons 2 100
  • Landing Ship, Tank (LST 1179) 2 100
marine corps reserve
Marine Corps Reserve
  •  The mission of the Marine Corps Reserve is to augment and reinforce the United States Marine Corps Active Component by providing qualified units and individuals in time of war or other national emergency.
  • In its augmentation role, the Marine Corps Reserve provides trained and equipped units, detachments, or individuals to the active force to bring force structure to the required level.
  • In its reinforcement role, the Marine Corps Reserve provides assets for additional depth, as combat replacements, and to expand combat structure in the active force.
contributions to the marine corps marine corps reserve
Contributions to the Marine CorpsMarine Corps Reserve

NUMBER % OF UNIT TYPE UNITSMARINE CORPS

  • COMMAND ELEMENT
  • Civil Affairs Groups 2 100
  • Air-Naval Gunfire Liaison Companies 2 100
  • Force Reconnaissance Companies 2 40
  • Communications Battalions 1 25
  • GROUND COMBAT ELEMENT
  • Marine Divisions 1 25
  • Headquarters Battalions 1 25
  • Tank Battalions 2 50
  • Artillery Battalions 5 33
  • Reconnaissance Battalions 1 33
  • Combat Engineer Battalions 1 25
  • Infantry Battalions 9 27
  • Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalions 1 25
  • Assault Amphibian Battalions 1 20
contributions to the marine corps marine corps reserve29
Contributions to the Marine CorpsMarine Corps Reserve

NUMBER % OF UNIT TYPE UNITSMARINE CORP

COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT ELEMENT

Force Service Support Groups 1 25

Engineer Support Battalions 1 25

Transportation Support Battalions 1 25

Headquarters and Service Battalions 1 25

Maintenance Battalions 1 25

Supply Battalions 1 25

Medical Battalions 1 25

Dental Battalions 1 25

slide30

Contributions to the Marine CorpsMarine Corps Reserve

NUMBER % OF UNIT TYPE UNITSMARINE CORP

  • AVIATION COMBAT ELEMENT
  • Marine Aircraft Wings 1 25
  • Marine Aircraft Groups 4 28
  • Adversary Squadrons 1 100
  • Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadrons 2 25
  • Marine Fighter/Attack Squadrons 4 33
  • Marine Medium Helicopter Squadrons 2 10
  • Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadrons 2 14
  • Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons 4 28
  • Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadrons 2 40
  • Marine Air Control Groups 1 25
slide31

Contributions to the Marine CorpsMarine Corps Reserve

NUMBER % OF UNIT TYPE UNITSMARINE CORP

  • AVIATION COMBAT ELEMENT
  • Marine Wing Communications 1 14
  • Marine Air Support Squadrons 1 25
  • Marine Tactical Air Control Squadrons 1 25
  • Low Altitude Air Defense Battalions 1 33
  • MACS TAOC Detachments 2 40
  • MWCS Airfield Detachments 1 17
  • Marine Wing Support Groups 1 25
  • Marine Wing Support Squadrons 4 28
slide33
The Total Army Analysis consists of both qualitative and quantitative analysis to generate tactical support forces and general purpose forces necessary to sustain and support the divisional and nondivisional combat forces.
  • The product of the Total Army Analysis processes is the approved force structure for the Total Army which has been divided for resource management purposes into components:
  • the Active Army (COMPO 1),
  • the Army National Guard (COMPO 2),
  • the United States Army Reserve (COMPO 3), and
  • Unresourced Units (COMPO 4).
slide34
COMPO 4 units, mostly Combat Service Support (CSS) units, are part of the Army’s required force structure, but are deliberately unresourced so that available resources can be applied to higher priority peacetime force structure initiatives and other Army programs.
slide35

Total Army Wartime Structure

Total Army Increments

28 COMBAT

DIVISIONS

Infantry, Mechanized, Armor, Airborne, Air Assault

Armored CAV, Separate Infantry, Armor, Artillery, Engineers, Pathfinders, Special Forces

NON-DIVISIONAL

COMBAT UNITS*

Aviation, Ammunition, Chemical, Civil Affairs, Combat Electronics, Intelligence, Composite Service, Engineers, Finance, Judge Advocate, Logistics, Medical, Military Police, Petroleum, Psychological Operations, Signal and Transportation

TACTIAL

SUPPORT

INCREMENT

SPECIAL THEATER

FORCES

Theater Defense Brigades, Engineer and Support to Other Services

Training Divisions and Brigades, Hospitals, Dental, Intelligence, Military Police, Schools, Reception Stations, Garrisons, Maneuver Area and Training Commands, Transportation, Selective Service and Army Reserve Commands

GENERAL

SUPPORT

* As of 2001: 10 Active Army Divisions,

8 Army National Guard Divisions

slide36

Total Army Wartime Structure

Component Contributions

Percent of

Structure

Roundout

NG USAR

COMBAT

DIVISIONS

434,700

39 1

NON-DIV

COMBAT

249,200

56 13

TACTIAL

SUPPORT

26 39

387,300

SPECIAL

THEATER

18 21

85,600

GENERAL

SUPPORT

349,600

10 23

ACTIVE

ARNG

USAR

UNMANNED

February 85

government performance and results act of 1993
Government Performance and Results Act of 1993

This QDR Report serves as the overall strategic planning document of the Department, as required by Public Law 103-62. Section III, “Defense Strategy,” gives the Department’s comprehensive mission statement. General goals are covered in Section II, under “U.S. Interests and Objectives.”

government performance and results act of 199339
Government Performance and Results Act of 1993

The Department’s general policy objectives are to

(1) Assure allies and friends,

(2) Dissuade future military competition,

(3) Deter threats and coercion against U.S. interests, and

(4) If deterrence fails, decisively defeat any adversary.

These goals are also discussed in Section II.

government performance and results act of 199340
Government Performance and Results Act of 1993

The Department’s risk framework of mitigating

(1) Force Management Risk,

(2) Operational Risks,

(3) Future Challenges Risk, and

(4) Institutional Risks,

are described in Section VII, along with a variety of management initiatives for these areas.

These risk areas will form the basis for the Department’s annual performance goals under the Government Performance and Results Act.

slide41

UNIQUE ARMYCAPABILITIES

TRAINING DIVISIONS / BDE

(238 UNITS)

100%

CIVIL AFFAIRS

(37 UNITS)

97%

PSYCHOLOGICAL OPNS

(38 UNITS)

89%

JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL

(120 UNITS)

98%

ACTIVE

ARNG

USAR

February 85

u s army civil affairs a relevant and responsive force
U.S. Army Civil AffairsA Relevant and Responsive Force
  • October 21, 2003
  • The unique capabilities of Civil Affairs units and soldiers are critically important to the present and potential worldwide missions of our Armed Forces.
  • These capabilities cross the full spectrum of joint military operations from humanitarian assistance through peace operations, up to and into the highest intensity conflict, post conflict termination and return to peace.
slide43
More than 95% of authorized Army Civil Affairs positions are provided by the U.S. Army Reserve Civil Affairs units that vary in size, organization and capability. They consist of commands, brigades, battalions and companies.
  • They are composed of soldiers who are specialists in Civil Affairs functions that include: public administration, public education, public safety, international and domestic law, food and agriculture, economic development, civilian supply, public transportation, public works and utilities, public communications, emergency services, environmental management, cultural relations, civil information and dislocated civilians.
slide44
The functional qualifications of soldiers in Army Reserve Civil Affairs units are based primarily on their civilian education, training, professions, vocations, experience, and backgrounds. Civil Affairs is one of the core competencies of the Army Reserve. It is neither feasible nor practical to train or maintain this kind of functional expertise in the Active Army.
  • The Army’s Civil Affairs capabilities and early responsiveness in both the Active Army and Army Reserve units are being enhanced by decisions and actions begun in 1999. Of the 37 Army Reserve units, 21 are battalions. That number is being increased to 25. The Active Army battalion is also being increased.
slide45

National Guard and Reserve Units Called to Active Duty

(July 21, 2004)

Individual Mobilization

Augmentees

Grand Total

with Units

Military Service

AIR FORCE

ARMY

COAST GUARD

MARINE CORPS

NAVY

11,509

126,856

1,542

10,929

2,763

153,599

1

1,754

1,542

-

84

the army looks forward
THE ARMY LOOKS FORWARD

“Serving a Nation at War: A CampaignQuality Army with Joint and Expeditionary Qualities”

Acting Secretary of the Army and theChief of Staff of the Army Parameters, Summer 2004

slide47

THREAT

POST - 9/11

PRE - 9/11

  • Symmetrical Adversaries
  • Cold War
  • Korea
  • Location Known (10 Divisions to Europe in 10 days – POMCUS)
  • The Cold War Doctrine reflected the strategic environment dominated by a singular adversary and the opposing army in symmetric contrast to our own.
  • Asymmetrical Adversaries
  • Non-state Actors
  • Networks
  • Adaptive
  • Self-organizing on basis of ideas unconstrained by shared values
  • Little target infrastructure or institutions
slide49

Soldiers organized, trained and equipped to go anywhere in the world, at any time, in any environment, against any adversary to accomplish the assigned mission in short-notice operations, austere theaters of operations with incomplete information.

Interdependence of joint service capabilities working together smoothly – land, air, sea and space.

Changes in reserve component organizations will match those in the active component. Reserve component forces are a vital part of the Army’s deployable combat power.

slide50

The National Guard will continue to provide strategic and operational depth and flexibility; the Army Reserve will still reinforce the Army with skill-rich capabilities across the spectrum of operations.

Adjust the active/reserve mix so that active component forces can execute the first 30 days of any deployment.

For that purpose, some high-demand, low-density capabilities currently found only in the reserve components must be reincorporated in the active force.

slide51

At the same time, while we will not expect reserve component units to deploy in the first 30 days, they will employ forces within hours for security operations within our homeland.

As with the active forces, the need to build predictability into reserve component deployments will require increasing the proportion of high-demand, low-density units in the reserve components.

slide52

(Similar related rethinking about training, personnel policies, professional education, leader development doctrine, material logistics and installations.)

“The best way to anticipate the future is to create it. The Army is moving out, and this is merely the beginning.”

“Our incentive is not change for change’s sake. Our incentive is effectiveness in this protracted conflict. If necessary to defeat our adaptive adversaries, the changes described here are a mere down-payment on changes that will follow.”

“But our challenge is to measure ourselves not against others, but against our own potential. It is not enough that we are changing. The real question is, “Are we changing enough?”

slide53

“Our brave Soldiers and adaptive leaders constitute the best Army in the world, but we can be even better. It is inside of us and it is what the Nation expects.”

“The future as we know it – our lives, the lives of our families, this country, everything we love and cherish – all depend on our success in meeting this challenge.”

“Are you wearing your dog tags?”

Hon. Les BrownleeGen. Peter J. Schoomaker

Acting Secretary of the Army Chief of Staff, United States Army

slide54

The Soldier's Creed

I am an American Soldier.

I am a Warrior and a member of a team.

I serve the people of the United States and live the Army Values.

I will always place the mission first.

I will never accept defeat.

I will never quit.

I will never leave a fallen comrade.

I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and

proficient in my warrior tasks and drills.

I always maintain my arms, my equipment and myself.

I am an expert and I am a professional.

I stand ready to deploy, engage, and destroy the enemies of

the United States of America in close combat.

I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life.

I am an American Soldier.

slide55

WHEN WE WERE NEEDED, WE WERE THERE

It was a feeling started long ago one bleak and wintry morn,

When the call went out for volunteers in a nation being born.

No sunshine patriot speeches,

No summer soldier songs

For the special men who’d pay the price to keep the country strong.

When we were needed, we were there.

If you want to find out who we are just ask us where we’ve been,

From the frozen fields of Valley Forge to the trail called Ho Chi Minh.

To the glory and the sacrifice we do our job each day.

We’re citizens and soldiers, an Army all the way.

When we were needed, we were there.

No, it wasn’t always easy, it wasn’t always fair

But when freedom called, we answered, we were there.

A R M Y

slide58

GO 22

HEADQUARTERS

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

Washington, DC, 1 June 1989

  • General Orders
  • No. 22

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE U.S. ARMY RESERVE CIVIL AFFAIRS

CORPS IN THE U.S. ARMY REGIMENTAL SYSTEM (USARS)

The U.S. Army Reserve Civil Affairs Corps is placed under the U.S. Army Regimental System, effective 16 June 1989. The regimental home of the U. S. Army Reserve Civil Affairs Corps is ESTABLISHED AT Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

[DAMH-HSO-U]

By Order of the Secretary of the Army:

Official:

MILTON H. HAMILTON

Administrative Assistant to the

Secretary of the Army

CARL E. VUONO

General, United States Army

Chief of Staff

DISTRIBUTION:

Active Army, ARNG, USAR: To be distributed in accordance with DA Form 12-4 requirements for Department of the Army General Orders.

slide59

*GO 9

  • General Orders
  • No. 9

HEADQUARTERS

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

Washington, DC, 22 September 2004

RENAMING OF THE U.S. ARMY RESERVE CIVIL AFFAIRS CORPS

Effective 16 June 2004, The U.S. Army Reserve Civil Affairs Corps is renamed to The US. Army Civil Affairs Corps. It will remain under the U.S. Army Regimental system. The regimental home of the U.S. Army Civil Affairs Corps is Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

[AOJK-SP]

By order of the Secretary of the Army:

PETER J. SCHOOMAKER

General, United States Army

Chief of Staff

Official:

JOEL B. HUDSON

Administrative Assistant to the

Secretary of the Army

DISTRIBUTION:

This publication is available in electronic media only and is intended for the Active Army, the Army national Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve

*This General Order supersedes General Order 22, dated 1 June 1989.

slide61

Dedication of the Civil Affairs commemorative stone and its emplacement in the Memorial Plaza of the Headquarters, U.S. Army Special Operations Command “In recognition of all soldiers who serve in Civil Affairs/Military Government assignments… past, present and future.”

Participating, representing sponsors of the stone – The Civil Affairs Association and the Civil Affairs Corps – MG (Ret.) William R. Berkman

slide62

[Civil Affairs Branch Insignia]

CIVIL AFFAIRS

“SECURE THE VICTORY”

In recognition of all soldiers who serve in Civil Affairs/

Military Government assignments… past, present and future.