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SUPER WHY Reading Camps: Strategies and Techniques for Prospective Camp Leaders PowerPoint Presentation
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SUPER WHY Reading Camps: Strategies and Techniques for Prospective Camp Leaders

SUPER WHY Reading Camps: Strategies and Techniques for Prospective Camp Leaders

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SUPER WHY Reading Camps: Strategies and Techniques for Prospective Camp Leaders

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    1. SUPER WHY Reading Camps: Strategies and Techniques for Prospective Camp Leaders

    2. SUPER WHY Reading Camps: Strategies and Techniques for Prospective Camp Leaders Well begin soon! You should hear music coming from your computer speakers. Not hearing it? Send us a message in the Chat box.

    3. SUPER WHY Reading Camps: Strategies and Techniques for Prospective Camp Leaders

    4. About the National Center for Media Engagement (NCME) NCME serves public media stations, producers, and national organizations. We help public media strengthen their ability to engage local communities. Learn more at www.mediaengage.org NCME is funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

    7. Todays Presenters

    8. Polls:

    9. Agenda

    10. Karen Samnick Vice President of Outreach Out of the Blue

    11. SUPER WHY Reading Camp

    12. Camp Execution

    13. Age-Appropriate Program

    14. Elements of Each Camp Session

    15. Reading Camps Format

    16. Lickety Literacy Skills Each day the kids watch the show, then transform into one character and practice his/her skill. Role play is important part of the brand. they play out that characters game and participate in extended learning activities that take that skill and apply it to popular games like Bingo, Charades, Basketball, and Relay - on the last day, parents are invited to watch their children perform the games that they learned during the week children and families get to meet a SW costume character and participate in a photo op Weve developed a lot of material that can be repurposed, its a constantly evolving program, so we can look to develop new games and activities to refresh it Each day the kids watch the show, then transform into one character and practice his/her skill. Role play is important part of the brand. they play out that characters game and participate in extended learning activities that take that skill and apply it to popular games like Bingo, Charades, Basketball, and Relay - on the last day, parents are invited to watch their children perform the games that they learned during the week children and families get to meet a SW costume character and participate in a photo op Weve developed a lot of material that can be repurposed, its a constantly evolving program, so we can look to develop new games and activities to refresh it

    17. Extended Learning Materials

    18. Reading Camps Assessment Results Beth Phillips at the Florida Center for Reading Research analyzed the data from student assessments in 2008. Kids should statistically significant gains across all skills taught. - Not only are kids having fun and interacting with the brand, they are learning, which shows we are satisfying the DOEs objectives.Beth Phillips at the Florida Center for Reading Research analyzed the data from student assessments in 2008. Kids should statistically significant gains across all skills taught. - Not only are kids having fun and interacting with the brand, they are learning, which shows we are satisfying the DOEs objectives.

    19. Camp Feedback

    22. Trista Peitzman PK-12 Coordinator Iowa Public Television

    23. Implementing SUPER WHY Reading Camps Thank you for giving IPTV this opportunity to speak about our experiences with Super Why Camps. We have held 8 camps over the past 3 years in 2 different communities. In this process, we have made modifications and gained a great deal of insight that I am proud to share. Ill start first by talking about why you might want to implement a Super Why camp.Thank you for giving IPTV this opportunity to speak about our experiences with Super Why Camps. We have held 8 camps over the past 3 years in 2 different communities. In this process, we have made modifications and gained a great deal of insight that I am proud to share. Ill start first by talking about why you might want to implement a Super Why camp.

    24. Build from the Broadcast Building educational activities locally from the broadcast programs provides a connection for children and families 1. At IPTV, we often build from the broadcast for our local educational activities. Using this approach provides a connection for children and families.1. At IPTV, we often build from the broadcast for our local educational activities. Using this approach provides a connection for children and families.

    25. Kids Desire to improve the literacy skills of the children in your community We also have the desire to improve the literacy skills of the children in Iowa. We are part of the Iowa Dept. of Education, and it is truly part of our mission to educate.We also have the desire to improve the literacy skills of the children in Iowa. We are part of the Iowa Dept. of Education, and it is truly part of our mission to educate.

    26. Partnerships Get schools, daycare providers, community partners to see you as active members in your community, and helping to meet their needs. Super Why camps are a great way to develop partnerships in your communities. We worked with schools, daycare centers, Head Start, a church-based preschool program in our recruitment of students and delivery of the camps.Super Why camps are a great way to develop partnerships in your communities. We worked with schools, daycare centers, Head Start, a church-based preschool program in our recruitment of students and delivery of the camps.

    27. Media Attention Get noticed for your local efforts These are photos from our first year. You can see that we went all out with the Super Why character, a Super Why cake, the mayor came, and we had great newspaper coverage. It is really nice to be recognized for all of your efforts.These are photos from our first year. You can see that we went all out with the Super Why character, a Super Why cake, the mayor came, and we had great newspaper coverage. It is really nice to be recognized for all of your efforts.

    28. Research & Experimentation Opportunity to learn what works at the classroom level The camps also gave us the opportunity to work at the classroom level to see how this curriculum works to improve kids literacy skills and if it would work in our state. As a result, we have learned some great lessons about choosing camp leaders and the many tasks involved which I will share today.The camps also gave us the opportunity to work at the classroom level to see how this curriculum works to improve kids literacy skills and if it would work in our state. As a result, we have learned some great lessons about choosing camp leaders and the many tasks involved which I will share today.

    29. Life in the Camp Fun Fast-paced Exciting for the campers It is important to remember that for these preschool campers, Super Why camp probably rates among the top 5 most exciting times they have ever had in their lives. It can be that for them only if the leader makes it so.It is important to remember that for these preschool campers, Super Why camp probably rates among the top 5 most exciting times they have ever had in their lives. It can be that for them only if the leader makes it so.

    30. Finding the Right Leader Work with existing programs Work with the school district We suggest: Certified Educator, PK-1 Personality is EVERYTHING Avoid the rule monger Finding the right leader will depend on how involved you want to be in the camp at your station. You may wish to work with existing preschool or summer camps, in which you may have little control or you may wish to be highly involved and hire your own camp leader. Finding the right leader will depend on how involved you want to be in the camp at your station. You may wish to work with existing preschool or summer camps, in which you may have little control or you may wish to be highly involved and hire your own camp leader.

    31. Camp Duties Coordinator (Station or Partner) Select and/or hire camp leaders Determine camp location and logistics Train the camp leaders Purchase materials Print materials Recruitment, assessment Set policies There are many duties to consider when you set up a camp. Ive divided them into two categories, the coordinator and camp leader duties, but these are not set in stone.There are many duties to consider when you set up a camp. Ive divided them into two categories, the coordinator and camp leader duties, but these are not set in stone.

    32. Camp Duties Camp Leader (Teacher) Receive training Read all curriculum thoroughly Prepare camp craft and print materials Prepare AV equipment Prepare nametags, class list Daily teaching and assessments Family correspondence The camp leader needs to be prepared to teach the camp, which includes the list above.The camp leader needs to be prepared to teach the camp, which includes the list above.

    33. Implementation Teacher As far as implementing the camps, you could implement them at many different levels. At IPTV, we have used 3 different levels for implementation, each for their own reasons as part of the learning process. The first level is what I call the Teacher Level. High involvement and high control. This was the model we used for most of our camps. We purchased the craft materials, snacks, hire the camp leaders, determining the location, bussing, preparing the materials, training the leaders, teaching some of the activities, etc. Very time intensive, but you do have a lot of control. This is where we learned a great deal about how teachers will adapt and modify materials and activities to meet their students needs, and also how teachers expectations are really important. As far as implementing the camps, you could implement them at many different levels. At IPTV, we have used 3 different levels for implementation, each for their own reasons as part of the learning process. The first level is what I call the Teacher Level. High involvement and high control. This was the model we used for most of our camps. We purchased the craft materials, snacks, hire the camp leaders, determining the location, bussing, preparing the materials, training the leaders, teaching some of the activities, etc. Very time intensive, but you do have a lot of control. This is where we learned a great deal about how teachers will adapt and modify materials and activities to meet their students needs, and also how teachers expectations are really important.

    34. Implementation Partner The second level is what I call the Partner Level. Medium involvement and control. We still purchased the craft materials, snacks, hired the camp leaders, prepared some of the materials, and trained the leaders. We left the notes to be sent home up to the partner school. Bussing, lunch duties, etc. left up to the school. The school also completed all of the assessments on their own. The second level is what I call the Partner Level. Medium involvement and control. We still purchased the craft materials, snacks, hired the camp leaders, prepared some of the materials, and trained the leaders. We left the notes to be sent home up to the partner school. Bussing, lunch duties, etc. left up to the school. The school also completed all of the assessments on their own.

    35. Implementation Leader This third level is what I call the Leader Level. We did some of this last year, and this is our plan for camps in the years to come. This level has a much lower time investment for our station staff, but we also have little control over how the curriculum is used. At the Leader Level, we supply the curriculum, training, and best practices information to anyone wishing to hold a camp, or who is wanting to use the Super Why curriculum along with their existing preschool or daycare. We feel that this level is sustainable for us, and that the online tutorial created by WGBH will be a perfect fit for us. This third level is what I call the Leader Level. We did some of this last year, and this is our plan for camps in the years to come. This level has a much lower time investment for our station staff, but we also have little control over how the curriculum is used. At the Leader Level, we supply the curriculum, training, and best practices information to anyone wishing to hold a camp, or who is wanting to use the Super Why curriculum along with their existing preschool or daycare. We feel that this level is sustainable for us, and that the online tutorial created by WGBH will be a perfect fit for us.

    36. This third level is what I call the Leader Level. We did some of this last year, and this is our plan for camps in the years to come. This level has a much lower time investment for our station staff, but we also have little control over how the curriculum is used. At the Leader Level, we supply the curriculum, training, and best practices information to anyone wishing to hold a camp, or who is wanting to use the Super Why curriculum along with their existing preschool or daycare. We feel that this level is scalable and sustainable for us, and that the online tutorial created by WGBH will be a perfect fit for us. This third level is what I call the Leader Level. We did some of this last year, and this is our plan for camps in the years to come. This level has a much lower time investment for our station staff, but we also have little control over how the curriculum is used. At the Leader Level, we supply the curriculum, training, and best practices information to anyone wishing to hold a camp, or who is wanting to use the Super Why curriculum along with their existing preschool or daycare. We feel that this level is scalable and sustainable for us, and that the online tutorial created by WGBH will be a perfect fit for us.

    37. John Craig Vice President, Education & Outreach WNED

    38. WNED SUPER WHY Reading Camps (2007-10)

    39. Objective

    40. Planning Teacher Training Have a Backup Plan Daily Curriculum Children Setting (ages 4-5) Activities Conducted in Small Groups Pre & Post Test Evaluation

    41. Community Partners Read to Succeed Buffalo (Coalition) Bethel Head Start Centers Kiddie Corner Day Care Westminster Community Charter School

    42. Funding & Sustainability Read to Succeed Buffalo Early Reading First Grant WNED RTL Demonstration Site Station Outreach Kit Underwriting Efforts School/Library Partnerships

    43. Next Steps Seek Financial Support of $1,500: Camp Materials (curriculum, handouts, training, etc.): $500 SUPER WHY Character Costume: $350 Supplies for crafts, activities, giveaways: $100 Staff Time (2 weeks (training, support, 5 day camp [.5]): $500 SUPER WHY Celebration: $50

    44. Mary Haggerty Manager, Educational Outreach WGBH

    45. SUPER WHY Reading Camps Section on the Web site Online Tutorial National Partners Staying Connected

    46. Web site

    47. Online Tutorial

    48. National Partners

    49. Staying Connected

    50. Q & A

    51. THANK YOU for attending todays webinar. Well e-mail you soon with links and resources from todays presentation.