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Unit 17: Teaching NAUI Diving Courses and Programs. Enrollment Course Goals Instructor Growth and Privileges Technical Diver Training Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses Concurrent Training Model

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unit 17 teaching naui diving courses and programs
Unit 17:Teaching NAUI Diving Courses and Programs
  • Enrollment
  • Course Goals
  • Instructor Growth and Privileges
  • Technical Diver Training
  • Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance
    • Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses
  • Concurrent Training Model
  • Role Playing
  • Final Examinations
  • Counseling
  • Making Scuba Instruction Fun
student performance by the end of the lesson you will be able to
Student Performance:By the end of the lesson you will be able to:
  • Explain the enrollment process.
  • Describe the goals of various NAUI courses.
  • Describe the prerequisites and privileges associated with leadership and instructor ratings.
  • Tell about NAUI’s Technical Diver Training Division.
  • Evaluate performance in NAUI leadership and instructor level courses.
  • Conduct internship programs utilizing the concurrent training model.
  • Explain how role-playing is used in NAUI courses, its strengths and weaknesses.
  • Explain the requirements for final examinations in NAUI courses and the fundamentals of test construction.
  • Counsel leadership and instructor candidates.
  • Use games and play activities as instructional tools.
enrollment
Enrollment
  • Statement of Understanding and Student Learning Agreement
  • Medical History Form
  • Waiver Release and Indemnity Agreement
  • Student Record Folder
  • Leadership and Instructor Candidate Record Folder
course goals
Course Goals
  • Core Non-Leadership Courses
    • Scuba Diver Course
    • Advanced Scuba Diver Course
    • Rescue Scuba Diver Course
    • Master Scuba Diver Course
course goals continued
Course Goals (continued)
  • Assistant Instructor Course
  • Skin Diving Instructor Course
  • Divemaster Course
  • Instructor Course (ITC/ICC)
  • Staff Training Workshop (STW)
  • Instructor Trainer Workshop (ITW)
  • Course Director Workshop (CDW)
technical diver training

Technical Diving Division

Technical Diver Training
  • Technical Diver Training Division formed in 1997
  • Codify technical diver training standards
  • Assure high level of quality training
  • Develop full range of support materials
evaluating leadership and instructional performance
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance
  • Reasonable
  • Understandable
  • Measurable
  • Behavior oriented
  • Agreed upon
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued1
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Classroom teaching presentation evaluation criteria
    • Introduction
      • [4] Was an attention-gaining step used?
      • [3] Was the importance or value of the presentation well established?
      • [3] Was what students should be able to do at the end of the lesson and how well they should be able to do it (objectives) presented?
      • [3] Were the main points of the lesson outlined?
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued2
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Classroom teaching presentation evaluation criteria (continued)
    • Body
      • [3] Was the lesson organized and did it follow a logical progression?
      • [3] Was the information presented safe and correct?
      • [3] Were training aids used effectively?
      • [3] Did the instructor involve the students in the lesson, hold their attention, and control the class?
      • [3] Was the estimated time of the lesson used effectively to reach the learning objectives?
      • [4] Was the topic presented enthusiastically?
      • [4] Was continuing education promoted?
      • [4] Was all terminology completely correct?
      • [5] Was the presentation innovative?
      • [5] Was the presentation polished and professional?
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued3
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Classroom teaching presentation evaluation criteria (continued)
    • Summary
      • [3] Was there a review of the main points of the lesson?
      • [3] Were the key points of the lesson emphasized?
      • [4] Were the learning objectives tested?
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued4
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Confined water teaching presentation criteria
    • Skill introduction
      • [3] Was the importance or value established?
      • [3] Was a statement of student performance objectives made?
      • [3] Was the general sequence of the activity provided?
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued5
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Confined water teaching presentation criteria (continued)
    • Skill Practice and Evaluation
      • [3] Was the exercise organized, safe, and controlled?
      • [3] Was there a clear and accurate demonstration?
      • [3] Was practice time efficient and observed?
      • [3] Were skill deficiencies and errors identified and prescriptive coaching and remedial practice provided for?
      • [3] Was there adequate student participation vs. passive listening or watching?
      • [4] Was good use made of assistant(s)?
      • [4] Was the exercise conducted enthusiastically?
      • [4] Were appropriate games used effectively?
      • [5] Was the presentation imaginative and innovative?
      • [5] Was the exercise polished, smooth, and professional?
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued6
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Confined water teaching presentation criteria (continued)
    • Skill Transition
      • [3] Were evaluations of student performance communicated to students?
      • [3] Were key points identified?
      • [4] Was good performance praised?
      • [5] Were suggestions for practice and improvement made?
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued7
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Open water teaching presentation criteria
    • Briefing
      • [3] Was a statement of training objectives provided?
      • [3] Were clear, concise instructions and a general sequence of activity provided?
      • [3] Were safety precautions and signals covered
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued8
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Open water teaching presentation criteria (continued)
    • Activity
      • [3] Was the activity organized, safe, and controlled?
      • [3] Were NAUI standards met?
      • [3] Was the activity time efficient and observed?
      • [3] Were skill deficiencies and errors identified, corrected, and remedial practice provided for?
      • [3] Were communications effective?
      • [4] Was good use made of assistants?
      • [4] Was the dive enjoyable?
      • [5] Was the conduct of the activity smooth and professional?
evaluating leadership and instructional performance continued9
Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance (continued)
  • Open water teaching presentation criteria (continued)
    • Debriefing
      • [3] Was the debriefing organized and effective?
      • [3] Were evaluations of student performance communicated to students?
      • [3] Were the key points identified?
      • [3] Was good performance praised?
      • [3] Were problems identified and suggestions for practice and improvement made?
      • [4] Was there enthusiasm throughout the presentation?
conducting performance reviews in leadership and instructor courses
Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses
  • Review elements
    • Score
    • Survey
    • Suggestions to improve
conducting performance reviews in leadership and instructor courses continued
Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses (continued)
  • Survey
    • Mechanics
    • Substance
    • Style
conducting performance reviews in leadership and instructor courses continued1
Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses (continued)
  • Suggestions to improve
  • Additional Methods of Critique
    • Training Team
    • Training Team with Staff
    • Audio and/or video recording
concurrent training model
Concurrent Training Model
  • Benefits
  • Setup
  • Results
role playing problem solving

Regulator free flow

Cylinder valve turned off

Mask will not seal

Regulator breathes hard

Air in BC preventing descent

Incorrect ballast

Poor surface dive performance

Ear squeeze/pain

Sinus squeeze/pain

Quick release of weights compromised

Inattentive

e

Over anxious

Bothering fellow students, “horseplay”

Cold, pre

-

hypothermic

nd

Incorrect surfacing technique

Failing to exhale while recovering 2

stage

Straps and buckles undone

Distracted by extraneous activity

Exhaustion

Incorrect fin kick

Unprepared

for class

Unsecured, dangling equipment

Difficulty clearing mask

Difficulty clearing regulator

Difficulty sharing air

Difficulty reading dive computer

Difficulty calculating air consumption

Fearful of aquatic life encountered

Role Playing: Problem Solving
role playing anticipating and preventing problems
Lack of planning.

Students facing the sun.

Ineffective voice, i.e., volume not adequate for conditions.

Ignoring safety violations.

Placing students near distractions.

Chewing gum, smoking cigarettes, wearing dark glasses, poor grooming and dress.

Lacking enthusiasm.

Turning one’s back to students while talking.

Failing to ensure that all can see a demonstration.

Failing to maintain control.

Playing favorites.

Ignoring questions or failing to ask for questions.

Continuing to speak through distractions.

Keeping hands in pockets.

Nervously pacing or fidgeting.

Using crutch words and phrases like “um,” “eh,” and “you know.”

Using profanity.

Failing to introduce one’s self.

Failing to establish rapport, being unapproachable.

Using sarcasm or belittling a student.

Chastising a student in front of peers.

Using slang or failing to explain terms.

Talking too much, too little student participation.

Role Playing:Anticipating and Preventing Problems
final examinations
Final Examinations
  • NAUI testing and evaluation program
    • Content Validity and Reliability
  • Examination administration
  • Statistical analysis and item/exam revision
final examinations continued
Final Examinations (continued)
  • Writing test questions
    • Multiple-choice
    • True-false
    • Matching type
    • Fill-in-the-blank
    • Essays
counseling
Counseling
  • Assists students to cope with obstacles and challenges
  • When and where
  • Effective Counseling
    • Empathy
    • The art of listening
    • Tune in to the student
    • Ask positive, open-ended questions
  • Counseling skills can be improved and perfected with practice
making scuba instruction fun
Making Scuba Instruction Fun
  • Classroom training aids
    • Training aids make learning interesting
    • Realia
    • Models
    • Demonstrating principles
  • Pool training aids and activities
    • Using games to teach and reinforce skills
    • Presenting skills as challenges
    • Using activities to divert attention from anxieties.
end of unit 17 teaching naui diving courses and programs
End of Unit 17Teaching NAUI Diving Courses and Programs
  • Enrollment
  • Course Goals
  • Instructor Growth and Privileges
  • Technical Diver Training
  • Evaluating Leadership and Instructional Performance
    • Conducting Performance Reviews in Leadership and Instructor Courses
  • Concurrent Training Model
  • Role Playing
  • Final Examinations
  • Counseling
  • Making Scuba Instruction Fun
student performance by the end of the lesson students will be able to
Student Performance:By the end of the lesson students will be able to:
  • Explain the enrollment process.
  • Describe the goals of various NAUI courses.
  • Describe the prerequisites and privileges associated with leadership and instructor ratings.
  • Tell about NAUI’s Technical Diver Training Division.
  • Evaluate performance in NAUI leadership and instructor level courses.
  • Conduct internship programs utilizing the concurrent training model.
  • Explain how role-playing is used in NAUI courses, its strengths and weaknesses.
  • Explain the requirements for final examinations in NAUI courses and the fundamentals of test construction.
  • Counsel leadership and instructor candidates
  • Use games and play activities as instructional tools.