classifying locating natural hazards n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Classifying & Locating Natural Hazards PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Classifying & Locating Natural Hazards

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 34

Classifying & Locating Natural Hazards - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 235 Views
  • Uploaded on

Classifying & Locating Natural Hazards. Magnitude ( vs ) Intensity. Magnitude An assessment of the size of an event But what characteristic property is measured? Wind speed? Barometric Pressure? Eye diameter? What unit? m/s, km/ h Intensity An assessment of the impact of a disaster

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Classifying & Locating Natural Hazards' - talisa


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
magnitude vs intensity
Magnitude (vs) Intensity
  • Magnitude
    • An assessment of the size of an event
    • But what characteristic property is measured?
      • Wind speed? Barometric Pressure? Eye diameter?
    • What unit?
      • m/s, km/h
  • Intensity
    • An assessment of the impact of a disaster
    • But what aspects of damage are considered?
      • Was it observed by people?
      • Property damage?
      • Death?
    • Unitless…a ranking
      • Category
slide5

http://www.weather.com/video/hurricane-categories-make-a-difference-38272http://www.weather.com/video/hurricane-categories-make-a-difference-38272

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eW3W1on9vjM

Hurricane Katrina

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-zczJXSxnw

Tacoma Bridge

slide6

Earthquakes – Moment Magnitude

http://allanawheeler.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/mms.jpg

volcanoes vei volcanic e xplosivity index
Volcanoes (VEI)Volcanic explosivity index

Blast duration

(hours)

< 1

<1

<1

<6

<12

>12

>12

>12

>12

Blast duration

(hours)

< 1

<1

<1

<6

<12

>12

>12

>12

>12

papadapoulos imamura scale tsunami
Papadapoulos-Imamura Scale (Tsunami)

Not felt

Scarcely felt

Weak

Largely observed

Strong

Slightly damaging

Damaging

Heavily damaging

Destructive

Very destructive

Devastating

Completely devastating

slide14

Wind Speed

km/hr

64 to 116

117 to 180

181 to 252

Fujita Scale

Tornadoes

253 to 330

331 to 417

418 to 509

510 to sonic

current impact risks
Current Impact Risks

http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/risks/

slide19

Mars

Mercury

Ida-243

Impact craters are found on any planetary body with a solid surface

Moon

earth s known impact structures
Earth’s Known Impact Structures

Earth retains the poorest record of impact craters amongst terrestrial planets

Plate tectonics - Erosion – Sedimentation - Life

Oceans are relatively young and hard to explore

Atmosphere

Why?

slide21

Roter Kamm, Namibia (1.6 mi)

Spider, Australia (8.1 mi)

Brent, Canada (2.4 mi)

Meteor Crater, AZ (0.75 mi)

Wabar, Saudi Arabia (0.072 mi)

Wolfe Creek, Australia (0.55 mi)

Manicouagan, Canada (62 mi)

Popigai, Russia (62 mi)

Vredefort, South Africa (125-185 mi)

slide23

Tunguska Event, Siberia

Aerial explosion of a stony asteroid, 25-50 m diameter

7:00 am June 30, 1908

Blue-white fireball wih glowing tail descended

Exploded above Tunguska Valley forest

10 Mt of TNT, 10 H-bombs

Sound heard over area of 1 million km2

Flattened and burned 2000 km2

Once every 300 years!

tunguska event russia
Tunguska Event, (Russia)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EiXpp-i442s

slide26

Odds of dying:

Motor vehicle accident 1 in 100

Asteroid impact (optimal chance) 1 in 3000

Flood 1 in 30,000

Tornado 1 in 60,000

Asteroid impact (worse chance) 1 in 250,000

http www cnet com news odds of dying from an asteroid strike 1 in 74817414
http://www.cnet.com/news/odds-of-dying-from-an-asteroid-strike-1-in-74817414/http://www.cnet.com/news/odds-of-dying-from-an-asteroid-strike-1-in-74817414/
http news nationalgeographic com news 2014 05 140512 asteroid impact winter science
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/05/140512-asteroid-impact-winter-science/http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/05/140512-asteroid-impact-winter-science/
blizzard
Blizzard

A severe winter storm lasting four or more hours. It is characterized by significant wind chill, strong winds and poor visibility due to blowing snow.

visibility < 1 km

wind speeds of >40 km/h

wind chill of -25ºC or colder

Duration 4+ hours

Environment Canada

http://www.mb.ec.gc.ca/air/wintersevere/blizzards.en.html

blizzards in canada
Blizzards in Canada:
  • 1 Alberta Clipper
  • 2 Maritimes Nor’easter
  • 3 Colorado Low
slide31

http://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/remembering-white-juan-10-years-later/21728/http://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/articles/remembering-white-juan-10-years-later/21728/

slide32

World Map of Natural Hazards. Earthquake hazard is shown in yellow–brownish colours and has been classified into five grades according to the minimum intensity (Modified Mercalli scale) to be reached or exceeded once in 475 years. Darkest colour means highest hazard. The hazard of tropical windstorms is presented in green colours, again darkest colour corresponds to highest hazard. Classification is according to the five degree Saffir–Simpson scale. Green arrows represent the main cyclone tracks. Other hazards shown are extratropical storms (grey shading) and active volcanoes (small black symbols).

Add to CiteULike

http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/364/1845/2147/F2.large.jpg

in summary
In Summary…
  • Hurricanes – Saffir Simpson Scale
  • Earthquakes – Moment Magnitude Scale
  • Volcanoes – VEI index
  • Tsunamis - Papadapoulos-Imamura Scale
  • Tornadoes – Fujita Scale
  • Impacts (NEOs) – Torino Scale
  • Severe Snowstorms - Blizzards