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Rad Fatties and 'The Obese': Activism, Fat Studies and Paradigm Shifts in the UK. Charlotte Cooper. What I'm going to do today. How I got into fat What I mean by fat activism How straight obesity research cannot recognise the richness of (my) fat experience

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Rad fatties and the obese activism fat studies and paradigm shifts in the uk l.jpg

Rad Fatties and 'The Obese':Activism, Fat Studies and Paradigm Shifts in the UK

Charlotte Cooper


What i m going to do today l.jpg
What I'm going to do today

  • How I got into fat

  • What I mean by fat activism

  • How straight obesity research cannot recognise the richness of (my) fat experience

  • How Fat Studies and HAES offer a different paradigm that can

  • Possible challenges

  • Some comments about the seminar series



What fat activism means to me l.jpg
What fat activism means to me

  • Interpretive framework

  • Citizenship

  • Structural change great, but not essential

  • Survival

  • Wellbeing

  • Radical potential of hope

  • Fun


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Dominant obesity discourse

  • Out of touch

  • Reductionist

  • Methodologically suspect

  • Stale model

  • Abstracts, absents and abjects 'the obese'

  • Stifles dissent

  • Utterly ill-equipped to understand me and my kind

  • Does not contribute to my quality of life as a fat person, it diminishes it


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Shifting the paradigm

  • Fat people are central as protagonists and producers of the discourse

  • Fat people are people with agency, context, community, resources, etc

  • Fat people are less likely to be abjected

  • There is a relationship between activism and scholarship

  • Fat people are more likely to be regarded as people rather than objects for intervention

  • Multi-disciplinary: includes health and medicalisation but also moves far beyond it

  • Values fat experience

  • Critical, celebratory, questioning


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Possible challenges

  • Needs broader/international research networks

  • Managing criticism

  • Bunker mentality, bullying and demonising

  • Same old same old

  • Recognising broader historical and cultural contexts


Thanks l.jpg
Thanks

[email protected]

www.obesitytimebomb.blogspot.com


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Bovey, S. (1989) Being Fat is Not a Sin, London: Pandora.

Butland, B., Jebb, S., Kopelman, P., McPherson, K., Thomas, S., Mardell, J. and Parry, V. (2005) 'Foresight Tackling Obesities: Future Choices – Project Report', Government Office for Science, London.

Cooper, C. (2009a) 'Fat Activism in Ten Astonishing, Beguiling, Inspiring and Beautiful Episodes', in Tomrley, C. & Kaloski Naylor, A. (Eds.) Fat Studies In The UK, York: Raw Nerve Books

— (2009b) 'Fat Lib: How Activism Expands The Obesity Debate', in Aphramor, L., Monaghan, L. & Emma, R. (Eds.) Expanding The Obesity Debate, Basingstoke: Palgrave

— (2009c) 'Maybe it should be called Fat American Studies?', in Rothblum, E. & Solovay, S. (Eds.) The Fat Studies Reader, New York: New York University Press forthcoming.

Evans, J. R., E.; Davies, B; Allwood, R. (2008) Education, Disordered Eating and Obesity Discourse: Fat Fabrications, Abingdon: Routledge.

Gard, M. (2008) 'Friends, Enemies and the Cultural Politics of Critical Obesity Research', in Wright, J. H., V. (Ed.) Biopolitics and the Obesity Epidemic: Governing Bodies, London: Taylor & Francis 31-34.

Guthman, J. (2009) 'Teaching the Politics of Obesity: Insights into Neoliberal Embodiment and Contemporary Biopolitics', Antipode, 41:5, 1110–1133.

Harvey, D. (2007) A Brief History of Neoliberalism, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hill, A. (2009) Living with Obesity: A Psychological Perspective. Size Matters? Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England, Bristol.

Kirkland, A. (2008) Fat Rights: Dilemmas of Difference and Personhood, New York: New York University Press.

Murray, S. (2005) 'Doing Politics or Selling Out? Living the Fat Body', Women's Studies International Forum, 34:3-4, 265-277.

Rothblum, E. & Solovay, S. (2009) The Fat Studies Reader, New York: New York University Press.

Schoenfielder, L. & Wieser, B. (1983) Shadow On A Tightrope: Writings By Women on Fat Oppression, San Francisco: Aunt Lute.

Spencer, A. (2005) DIY: The Rise of Lo-Fi Culture, London: Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd.

Stasko, C. (2008) '(r)Evolutionary Healing: Jamming with Culture and Shifting the Power', in Harris, A. (Ed.) Next Wave Cultures: Feminism, Subcultures, Activism, New York: Routledge 193-220.

Wright, J. & Harwood, V. (2008) Biopolitics and the Obesity Epidemic: Governing Bodies, London: Taylor & Francis.


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