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Transition: It’s Not Just for Kids – Parents Need a Transition Plan Too!. The GPS of Secondary Transition. April 4, 2009 - 9:00 AM – 12:10 PM Brown Bag Lunch Discussion – 12:10 PM – 1:00 PM. 9:00 - 9:10 a.m. Introduction and Overview 9:10 - 9:30 a.m. Why Focus on Transition

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slide1

Transition: It’s Not Just for Kids – Parents Need a Transition Plan Too!

The GPS of Secondary Transition

April 4, 2009 - 9:00 AM – 12:10 PM

Brown Bag Lunch Discussion –

12:10 PM – 1:00 PM

agenda
9:00 - 9:10 a.m. Introduction and Overview

9:10 - 9:30 a.m. Why Focus on Transition

Family Engagement and the Importance of Self Determination

9:30 - 9:45 a.m. A Personal Perspective

9:45 - 9:55 a.m. Participant Activity

9:55 - 10:00 a.m. Transition and the Law

10:00 - 10:15 a.m. The Transition Process – Post School Goals

10:15 - 10:25 a.m. Participant Activity

10:25 - 10:35 a.m. Break

10:35 - 10:45 a.m. The Transition Process – Present Education Levels

10:45 - 10:55 a.m. Participant Activity

Agenda
slide3
10:55 - 11:05 a.m. The Transition Process - Agency Involvement

11:05 - 11:15 a.m. The Transition Process – “The Grid”

11:15 - 11:30 a.m. The Transition Process – Measurable Annual Goals

11:30 - 11:40 a.m. Participant Activity

11:40 - 11:50 a.m. Alignment of Assessment to Goals

11:50 - 12: 00 p.m. Participant Activity

12:00 - 12:10 p.m. Wrap-up and Upcoming Events

12:10 - 1:00 p.m. Brown Bag Lunch Discussion

Agenda

on site q a and follow along checks
On Site Q & A and Follow Along Checks

We will be utilizing an email system for all questions and remote site location monitoring

Please use the following website to correspond with PaTTAN Pittsburgh:

vc@pattanpgh.net

slide5

Electronic copies of the Power Points and handouts from this session along with a recording of today’s session will be posted on:

  • the PaTTAN website
  • the PEAL website and
  • the Pennsylvania site on sharedwork.org
  • Aligning Accommodations & Supports
  • in the Repository section
  • in the folder entitled:

April 4, 2009 – The GPS of Secondary Transition

www.sharedwork.org/patransition

why focus on transition1
Why Focus on Transition?

Getting a high school diploma is not enough

The challenge is not only to ensure all students achieve high academic standards, but also gain skills needed to achieve their desired post-school goals and assume adult responsibilities in their communities

Storms, J., O’Leary, E., Williams, J (2000). Transition requirements: A guide for states, districts, schools, universities and families, p. 6

what is transition
What is Transition?

Is focused on your child’s preferences and interests

Address your child’s individual needs

Plans for a successful outcome for your child

Is a coordinated set of activities,

services and goals

Promotes the movement of your child from high school to adulthood

steps to a successful transition
Steps to a Successful Transition

Your child will begin to explore their goals for life after high school and develop a plan to achieve

these goals.

Step One

step two
Step Two

Design a program, at school and in the community, beginning at age 14, to help your child gain the skills necessary to achieve his/her goals.

This should include information on:

step three
Step Three

Develop a team of people who will help your child reach his/her goals. This may be people in the family, in the school and in the community.

step four
Step Four

Your child will graduate with skills and knowledge to help him/her:

dr seuss tells us
Dr. Seuss tells us

“You have brains in your head.

You have feet in your shoes.

You can steer yourself in any

Direction you choose.

You’re on your own

And you know what you know.

And YOU are the guy/girl

Who’ll decide where to go.”

family caregiver engagement in the secondary transition process

Family/Caregiver Engagement in the Secondary Transition Process

The Highest Stake…Of Great Value

families
Families
  • Families are essential to the transition process for any youth.
  • Parents and families are often the most helpful historians, providing the transition team partners with an essential level of detail about the background, experiences, and functional needs of the young person
slide16

Families

  • Family input early in the transition process establishes a solid foundation for planning and builds a critical connections and relationships with the transition partners
  • It is vital that educators and agency staff:
    • Build a trustworthy relationship with the young person and family
    • Appreciate the fact that families have a long history of working with multiple professionals with mixed results
    • Provide support to families to plan for change during the transition process
work backwards
Work backwards
  • Start now to build for the future!
  • Parents make the difference
  • Your child’s self-perception as a capable person is influenced by you and their experiences
  • Expectations make a difference
  • Develop a transition plan for yourself to move from primary care taker to secondary support person
universal truths
Universal Truths!
  • Learned Helplessness or Independence come from you
  • There is true dignity in risk
  • The development of self-determination is a learned behavior, based on experiences, attitudes and opportunities
why let go
Why Let Go?
  • Self-determined students twice as likely to be employed after high school

(Wehmeyer & Schwartz, 1997)

  • Greater post secondary enrollment (Mason, McGahee, Kovac, Johnson & Stillerman, 2002)
  • You won’t be there forever
what the research says
What the research says…
  • “Students who are more involved in setting educational goals are more likely to reach their goals.”
  • Wehmeyer found that “students with disabilities who are more self-determined are more likely to be employed and living independently in the community after completing high school than students who are less self-determined.”
national dissemination center for children with disabilities
National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities

According to transition information from NICHY, it is suggested that four of the most fundamental skills students can have that serve them well in a wide variety of adult situations are:

slide23

National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities

The ability to assess yourself, including your skills and abilities, and the needs associated with your disabilities

Awareness of the academic adjustments/accommodations you need

Knowledge of your civil rights to accommodations through legislation such as the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 (http://www.ed.gov/ocr )

The self-advocacy skills necessary to express your needs in the workplace, in educational institutions, and in community settings

slide24

Barriers to

Self-Determination

how to begin
How to begin
  • Timeline: When to begin
  • Sky is limit
  • Regardless of the extent of your son’s or daughter’s disabilities you can still begin the process of letting go
a personal perspective on self advocacy and secondary transition
A Personal Perspective on Self Advocacy and Secondary Transition

Presented by:

Rachel Kallem, Youth Advocate

The Pennsylvania Youth Leadership Network

transition services historical perspective

Education for Handicapped Act (P.L. 94-142 ) 1975:

Free Appropriate Public Education

Due Process Rights

Individual Education Plans

Least Restrictive Environment

Individual with Disabilities Education Act, 1990, 1997, 2000:

Driven and strengthens role of parent/guardian

Addresses free and appropriate public education

Considers graduation and improving results for ALL

Transition Services involves planning as part of IEP

Transition Services planning process is long term

Transition Services planning process involves agencies

Transition ServicesHistorical Perspective

slide31

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

IDEA 2004

Primary Purpose

  • To ensure that all children with disabilities have available to them a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent livingH.R.1350 (IDEA 2004)
age requirement
Age Requirement

Transition services must be addressed in the IEP of the student in the year in which the student turns 14 years of age

The IEP team does not have to wait until the student’s approaching 14th birthday year to consider the student’s transition needs

Pennsylvania Chapter 14 Regulations 7/2008

chapter 14 special education services programs
Chapter 14: Special Education Services & Programs

14.131. Individualized Education Program

(b) In addition to the requirements incorporated by reference in 34 CRF 300.29, 300.344(b) and 300.347(b) (relating to transition services; IEP team: and content of IEP), each school district shall designate person(s) responsible to coordinate transition activities.

33

a process for addressing transition
A Process for Addressing Transition

Step One: Identify the student’s post-school desired goals or vision. (Assessment)

Step Two: Describe the student’s Present Levels of Academic Achievement / Functional Performance (Assessment)

Step Three: Determine Agency Linkages and Supports

Step Four: Design a Transition Plan that includes courses of study and activities/services (transition grid)

Step Five: Determine Measurable Annual Goals that lead to post-school goals (academic, transition, etc)

Step Six: Monitor the progress of the Measurable Annual Goals

assessment is
Assessment is

A process of gathering relevant information to plan, evaluate, or make decisions (academic assessment, transition assessment, career assessment, vocational assessment).

Information can be gathered from multiple people and places over a period of time.

40

assessment test
Assessment ≠ test

Assessment= gathering information

assessment data from families it is real
Assessment Data from Families: It is Real!
  • On an ongoing basis, gather and synthesize all assessment information gathered from families
  • Families observe the young person within the context of genuine environments (home, community, etc.)
  • Behavioral observations provided by those who know the young person the best (family) can provide valuable insight into the transition planning process
process of career development
Process of Career Development

Career development is a continuous life process through which individuals explore activities, make decisions, and assume a variety of roles. Careers are formulated by the continuous evaluation of personal goals and the perception, assessment, and decisions regarding opportunities to achieve those goals. Career development occurs as educational and vocational pursuits interact with personal goals. It continues over the life span.

SOURCE: National Career Development Association, A Division of the American Counseling Association, Policy & Procedure Manual, 2007-08, http://www.ncda.org/pdf/policy_and_procedures2007-08.pdf

career assessment within the context of career development
Career Assessment within the Context of Career Development

The on-going process of collecting information for career development and career planning.

  • Lifelong process
  • Addresses all aspects of life within career contexts
  • People come to understand themselves
  • Cyclical process and content:
types of assessment
Types of Assessment
  • Transition Assessmentrelates to all life roles and the supports needed before, during, and after transition to adult life; it serves as an umbrella for career and vocational assessment and evaluation.
  • Career Assessmentrelates to life-long career development, which affects life roles, and is ongoing throughout one’s life.
  • Vocational Assessment and Evaluationrelate to the role of the potential worker (and employment).
what is transition assessment
What is Transition Assessment?

“Transition assessment is an ongoing process of collecting information on the student’s strengths, needs, preferences, and interests as they relate to the demands of current and future living, learning and working environments”

All stakeholders participate in the process of information-gathering and decision-making

2007 Corwin Press. Assess for Success: A Practitioner’s Handbook on Transition Assessment, 2nd ed., by Stillingtion, Neubert, Begun, Lombard, and Leconte

post school goals characteristics
Post-School GoalsCharacteristics

Measurable statements:

    • Based on Individual’s Assessment Data
  • Identifies where student will be AFTER high school
  • NOT intended to describe events that occur IN high school
  • NOT the same thing as IEP measurable annual goal
  • Addresses
    • Post-Secondary Education/Training
    • Employment
    • Independent Living
post school goals characteristics1
Post-School GoalsCharacteristics
  • Each post-school area must be addressed by the IEP team
  • Used for planning course(s) of study
  • Lead to measurable annual goal(s)
  • Link to agencies/community to support outcome
slide53

Post Secondary Education and Training

  • The I.E.P. team must discuss each goal area.
  • Possible goals:

The IEP team has determined that this goal area is not needed for the student at this time

Going to training school after high school and list the area of interest

Going to a 2-4 year college and area of interest

meet phillip
Meet Phillip
  • Grade 11
  • Fully included
  • Enrolled in a CTC Auto Body Repair Program
  • Reading and writing needs
employment
Employment
  • The I.E.P. team must discuss each goal area
  • Possible goals:
    • has a goal of working in an auto repair shop after high school
    • has a goal of working in a retail store after high school
    • The IEP team has determined that this goal area is not needed for the student at this time
sample post secondary goal independent living
Sample Post Secondary GoalIndependent Living
  • Possible goals:
  • a goal of living independently
  • a goal of living with friends in a supervised community setting
  • a goal of living with her/his family
    • The IEP team has determined that this goal area is not needed for the student at this time
more assessments
More Assessments……..

Aptitudes

combination of characteristics that helps us know if the student might learn or become proficient in a particular area

Gathering information to help us know if the student can reach these goals

Abilities talents or acquired skills

who provides assessment data
Who Provides Assessment Data?

Transition specialists, guidance counselors, teachers

Therapists (e.g. speech, occupational, physical)

Psychiatrists & psychologists

Behavioral Specialist

Rehabilitation counselors

Community service providers

Employers

Employment specialists

Vocational Evaluators or Assessment Specialists

Parents and family members

The young person

Others who have relevant experience, vested interest in the individual

for example therapy evaluations interdisciplinary collaboration
For example…Therapy Evaluations: Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Therapeutic evaluations can help determine if therapy is required to help an individual fulfill their potential

  • Center for Autism & Related Disabilities
career development as a context for assessment
Career Development as a Context for Assessment

Let’s review the Career Development Checklist.

Handout: 2007 Corwin Press. Assess for Success: A Practitioner’s

Handbook on Transition Assessment, 2nd ed., by Patricia L. Stillingtion,

Debra A. Neubert, Wynne H. Begun, Richard C. Lombard, and Pamela J. Leconte.

The Career Development Checklist may assist you with providing a starting point for ascertaining what phase individuals are in the career development process. The Relevant Assessment Questions for Career Development may assist in gathering data.

67

slide69

Domains/Content of Transition Assessment & Adulthood

Self Determination

Cronin, M. E. & Patton, J.R. (1993). Life skills instruction for all students with special needs:

A practice guide for integrating real-life content into the curriculum. P. 13. Austin TX: PRO-ED.

slide70

Step Two:

Describe the student’s Present Levels of Academic Achievement / Functional Performance

(Based on Assessment)

present levels must
Present Levels Must:
  • Identify strengths and prioritize needs
  • Describe effect of disability on performance
  • Provide a starting point for development of annual goals
  • Guide development of other areas of the IEP
  • Be data driven (measurable and observable)
  • Reference post-school transition goals.
example
Example:

Not measurable:

“Diane is doing better in math.”

example1
Example:

Measurable:

“Diane adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides multiple-digit computation problems with fewer than 3 errors on a mixed-skill math probe……”

sample present levels of academic achievement and functional performance phillip
Sample PRESENT LEVELS OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE: Phillip

Phillip is an 11th grade student, with a learning disability in reading and written language. He is currently enrolled in the career and technology (CTE) program for Auto Body Repair, with a half day at the High School where he is fully included in general education classes. He is on track for graduation with a regular diploma based on credits in his high school and career and technology programs

sample present levels of academic achievement and functional performance phillip1
Sample PRESENT LEVELS OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE: Phillip

At the beginning of 8th grade, Phillip had an assistive technology evaluation for assistance with reading in the content areas. Based on the evaluation, the district purchased “scan and read” software for use in his general education classes. He used it for reading assignments in 8th and 9th grade in science, health, and social studies. When textbook or other print materials were scanned into a digital format which Philip could then read with text-to-speech supports, he maintained grades in the 75% - 85% (C-B range) However, sincethe middle of 9th grade, while Phillip willingly accesses his tech manuals in digital format at the CTC, he has resisted using the software during his half day at the high school. He has stated that he is doing well enough without it, doesn’t need it for his classes, and doesn’t want to call attention to himself. Since he stopped using his scan and read software, his grade averages declined to average of 65% - 78% (D-C range), with the exception of English, in which he typically earns grades in the 60% - 70% (D range).

sample present levels of academic achievement and functional performance phillip2
Sample PRESENT LEVELS OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE: Phillip

While Phillip acknowledges that he struggles with reading, he also states that he is able to “get by” in classes by listening, making his own study guides for tests, and making his own graphic organizers for vocabulary. He states that the best strategy for him to understand difficult text is to re-read the material, and he also uses pencil marks and highlighters to mark what he considers to be important. He points out that he already comes in early to work on his reading three days a week.

sample present levels of academic achievement and functional performance phillip3
Sample PRESENT LEVELS OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE: Phillip

Phillip’s parents are supportive of his current career path, but report that they want him to keep his options open because he is so young to choose a career. They express concern that his reading skills will be an obstacle to success in the adult world. They are very supportive of the steps being taken by Phillip and his team to expand his use of digital materials in his general education classes this year. They would also like Phillip to explore whether this type of adaptation would be acceptable at a postsecondary program, and to find out what other accommodations are allowable. An informal parent survey, as well as the Comprehensive Informal Inventory of Knowledge and Skills for Transition, were given by the district, and indicate that Phillip is self sufficient and age appropriate in all areas of independent living.

sample present levels of academic achievement and functional performance phillip writing
Sample PRESENT LEVELS OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE: Phillip: Writing
  • Phillip’s English teacher describes his writing as “functional.” He uses word processing for longer writing assignments, and with use of the spelling and grammar check, produces short, concise sentences, although without a great deal of variety. Analysis of assignments completed on word processor indicates that his average sentence length is 7.5 words, with 2 or fewer errors of grammar or omission of words per 100 words. He met last year’s goal of improving his writing using word processing.
  • Analysis of shorter, pencil and paper writing tasks, from three different classes, indicates the following: Phillip typically writes 5-10 word sentences, with average length of 6.6 words. On a typical sequence of four sentences (approximately 26 words) , he makes on average 1-2 errors of capitalization, end punctuation, grammatical errors of tense or case, or omitting words without realizing it. On the same passage he averages 1-2 spelling errors (usually of longer words rather than sight words). When he is reminded to read his passage aloud or to himself, or to use a rubric or spelling guide, he is able to correct about 50% of these errors.
  • Phillip needs to improve the quality and accuracy of his writing in order to meet the expectations of a career in auto body or in a post-secondary program.
sample present levels of academic achievement and functional performance phillip4
Sample PRESENT LEVELS OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AND FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE: Phillip

Needs:

In order to meet his post-school goals, Phillip has the following specific needs:

  • Develop/improve reading comprehension skills in summarizing and identifying supporting details.
  • Improve written language by working on proofreading and self-correcting of errors.
  • Develop self management skills related to speed of task completion, and to more effectively discriminate when a particular task is complete while working on projects in the Auto Repair Shop.
  • Understand, and be able to articulate his needs for accommodations in current and post-secondary settings.
  • Integrate the use of assistive technology into his career preparation, by continuing to use digital formats and text-to-speech tools for reading, in the career and technology school as well as in content area classes.
  • Investigate local community college and technical schools to explore post-secondary options as well as allowable accommodations.
slide81

Step Three:

Determine Agency Linkages and Supports

slide82

For transition services that are likely

to be provided or paid for by other agencies, is there evidence that representatives of the agency(ies)

were invited with parent consent

to the IEP meeting?

§300.321(b)(3)

successful collaboration does not happen by accident
Successful Collaboration Does Not Happen by Accident

Seven essential factors to consider for

successful interagency collaborations:

Stakeholders' views of factors that impact successful interagency collaboration Exceptional Children; Reston; Winter 2003; Lawrence J Johnson; Debbie Zorn; Brian Kai Yung Tam; Maggie LaMontagne; Susan A Johnson

elements of successful collaboration
Elements of Successful Collaboration
  • Identify all potential transition partners and develop a strategy to build relationships with each of them individually and collectively
  • Bring key partners to the table, and be sure to address how they can benefit from the partnership
  • Always ask yourself, who is missing from the table that could contribute?
iep team participants for transition planning
IEP Team Participants for Transition Planning

Required Members

  • student
  • parents/guardians
  • local education agency representative (LEA)
  • regular education teacher
  • special education teacher
  • vocational-technical education representative

(if being considered)

Other Members

  • SD transition coordinator
  • psychologist
  • guidance counselor
  • instructional support staff
  • job coach (if considered)
  • employer representative
  • community/agency representatives
  • relatives/friends/advocate
word of caution
Word of Caution!

Never commit an agency or

an individual for a service or

activity without their full

knowledge and participation!

slide89

Step Four:

Design a Transition Plan that includes courses of study and activities/services (transition grid)

courses of study
Courses of Study

Do the transition services include courses of study that focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child to facilitate their movement from school to post-school?

§300.320(b)(2)

courses of study1
Courses of Study

Characteristics:

  • Supports post school outcomes
  • A coordinated set of activities
  • Focus on improving academic and functional achievement
  • Facilitate movement from school to post school by aligning curriculum with identified transition outcomes
  • Should promote graduation by meeting district standards
transition service activity
Transition Service / Activity
  • Action steps – both activities and services
  • Include instructional services to address skill deficits, supported by Measurable Annual Goals
  • Slated to occur during current IEP
  • Leading to achievement of post-school goal
  • Put all together from 1st year to final year of transition planning = coordinated set of activities
transition services
Transition Services

For each post-school outcome there needs to be at least one of the following:

(a) instruction,

(b) related service(s),

(c) community experience,

  • development of employment and other post-school adult living objective,
  • if appropriate, acquisition of daily living skill(s), or

(f) if appropriate, provision of a functional vocational evaluation listed in association with meeting the post-school outcome

continuum of instruction
Effective instruction is not limited to the classroom; it needs to occur in a variety of settings, including the workplaceContinuum of Instruction
  • The environment for effective instruction will be flexible, to meet the needs of youth.
sample service activity phillip
Sample Service / Activity: Phillip

* Denotes measurable annual goal

slide99

Step Five:

Determine Annual Goals that lead to post-school outcomes (academic, transition, etc)

measurable annual goal
Measurable Annual Goal
  • IEP goal, covers one year
  • Addresses skill deficits (identified in needs)
  • Begins from baseline of skill (present levels)
  • Describes skill attainment level (endpoint)
  • NOT curriculum
  • Contains measurable, countable data
  • Leads to visual, countable monitoring
  • Not more than 3-5 goals
does this goal measure up
Does this goal measure up?

Does this goal measure up?

John will learn and apply sorting skills at his job.

  • Condition:
  • Student Name: John
  • Clearly Defined Behavior:
  • Performance Criteria:
does this goal measure up1
Does this goal measure up?

Given mail slots with initial letters enlarged and underlined, John will sort mail by name of staff member at work with 100% accuracy for 10 consecutive daily sorting assignments.

  • Condition:
  • Student Name:
  • Clearly Defined Behavior:
  • Performance Criteria:
does this goal measure up2
Does this goal measure up?

Given mail slots with initial letters enlarged

And underlined, John will sort mail by name

of staff member at work with 100% accuracy

for 10 consecutive daily sorting assignments.

  • Condition: Given mail slots with

initial letters enlarged and underlined

  • Student Name: John
  • Clearly Defined Behavior: sort mail by name of staff member at work
  • Performance Criteria: 100% accuracy for 10 consecutive daily sorting assignments.
caroline
Caroline
  • 15 year old 10th grader
  • Recent behavioral concerns
  • Now has Positive Behavioral Support Plan
  • Interested in cosmetology and going to Career Technical Education Program next year
  • Writing skill deficits
  • Math skill deficits
  • Strengths in art and sports
caroline s current math
Caroline’s Current Math
  • Caroline is included for Algebra I class, with the support of a special education co-teacher in the classroom. She is cooperative in class, although she has three missing assignments this year. Accommodations that work for her include breaking assignments into chunks, frequent feedback and encouragement, and use of graphic organizers or drawings. Caroline has scored at the Below Basic Level on the last three 4Sight Math Benchmark assessments (which assess skills on 11th grade standards/anchors). Her Scaled Scores have continually increased since beginning at the Low Below Basic level in fall of 2007. Most frequent errors are in Numbers and Operations, including basic computation with fractions, decimals, and percents, and Algebraic concepts.
  • On AIMSS Algebra Foundations probes, since January 2008, she has improved from 7 correct answers to 13 correct answers on a five minute probe administered biweekly. Areas of difficulty on the probes include manipulating expressions and solving one step equations and simplifying expressions. She states that she enjoys seeing her progress on the math probes. Caroline also uses a math software program, three times a week during one of her support periods to address her specific needs with numbers and operations.
  • Her deficits in basic math and algebra skills will impact her ability to be successful in a cosmetology program or with independent living.
steps to getting the best transition program for your child resources
Steps to Getting the Best Transition Program for Your Child - Resources
  • HUNE-Hispanics United for Exceptional Children- Philadelphia area
  • 215-425-5112
  • Consultline

Information for families and advocates of children with disabilities

Toll free information line - 1-800-879-2301

  • Community Parent Resource Centers
  • Mentoring Parent Project-rural northwestern counties of PA

888-447-1431

steps to getting the best transition program for your child resources1
Steps to Getting the Best Transition Program for Your Child - Resources

Parent Training and Information Centers

Parent Education and Advocacy Leadership Center (PEAL)-West and Central PA –

866-950-1040

Parent Education Network (PEN)-East PA

800-522-5827

upcoming events
Upcoming Events

April 5th - 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

PYLN Webinar

April 14th- 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

COP - Self Determination PaTTAN Harrisburg

May 3rd -

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

PYLN Webinar

July 22-24, 2009

Transition Conference-

there will be NO pre-conference

slide120

Q & A

time