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Double Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

Double Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

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Double Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

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  1. Double Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Julie Paone Period 3 http://www.engr.psu.edu/ce/enve/logan/bioenergy/mfc_make_cell.htm

  2. Need • Alternate energy • Efficiency and economically priced • Wastewater has 9.3 more energy in it than what’s being used to treat it. • Microbial Fuel Cell http://www.engr.psu.edu/ce/enve/logan/web_presentations/MFC-MECs-Bruce-Logan-1-2-08.pdf

  3. Knowledge BaseAny organic material can create electricity • Organic matter  useful energy • Oxidation sends electrons to the anode • The electrons flow to cathode and join with protons • Voltage or Hydrogen Logan, 2009 http://www.engr.psu.edu/ce/enve/logan/publications/2009-Logan-NatRevMicrobiol.pdf

  4. Electrogenesis • Process of converting food into energy • Respiratory enzymes  ATP • Terminal electron acceptor (TEA) • Exogenously

  5. Construction Efficiency Cost Materials http://www.engr.psu.edu/ce/enve/logan/bioenergy/mfc_make_cell.htm

  6. Literature Review • A suggested experiment is measuring the power with different amounts of glucose. • In one equation, 1 molecule of glucose provides a maximum of 24 electrons. Bennetto, 1990 http://www.engr.psu.edu/ce/enve/logan/bioenergy/mfc_photos.htm

  7. Literature Review • Green algae can easily produce hydrogen, but can it directly produce electricity. • Light is their food source and they grow photo synthetically. • Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Melis, Berkeley

  8. Literature Review • Still many improvements needed to enhance the performance. • The construction is a main part in the efficiency. • The larger the anode and cathode, the greater the outcome. Logan, 2007

  9. Literature Review • Rhodopseudomonas palustris DX-1 • Cell voltage and current were used to calculate the power density (P=I/V). • Increase in anode surface increased performance. Xing, 2008 http://www.engr.psu.edu/ce/enve/logan/publications/2008-Xing-etal-ES&T.pdf

  10. Purpose Hypothesis • To determine whether the amount of food source significantly affects the amount of voltage produced by e. coli and algae in a Microbial Fuel Cell. • The null hypothesis states that the amount of food source will not significantly affect the voltage produced by bacteria and algae. • The alternate hypothesis states that the food source has a significant affect on the amount of voltage produced.

  11. Methodology

  12. Budget Provided • Two plastic bottles • Agar (used last year) • E. coli (used last year) • Glucose • Light bulbs • Fish tank air pump with plastic tubing • Resistors • Copper wire (plastic coated) • Wires with alligator clips • GLX Pasco Probe • Buy from Outside Stores • Short plastic pipe (PVC) • Plastic flanges, end caps with holes drilled • Carbon cloth (http://www.etek-inc.com/) • Sealing materials (epoxy) (Home Depot)

  13. Do ability • Experiment was done last year • Most materials are familiar • Background in culturing • Data collection was previously done • Materials are accessible http://www.engr.psu.edu/ce/enve/logan/bioenergy/mfc_make_cell.htm

  14. Bibliography • Bennetto, H. P., Electricity generation by microorganisms, National Centre for Biotechnology Education. Vol. 1, No.4, 1990 Pp. 163-168 • Liu, Hong, Grot, Stephen, Logan, Bruce E., Electrochemically Assisted Microbial Production of Hydrogen from Acetate, Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 39, 2005 Pp. 4317-4320 • Logan, Bruce E. Exoelectrogenic bacteria that power microbial fuel cells. Nature Reviews, Microbiology, Vol. 7, May 2009 Pp. 375-381 • Logan, Bruce E., Call, Douglas, Cheng, Shaoan, Hamelers, Hubertus V. M., Sleutels, Tom H. J. A., Jeremiasse, Adriaan W., Rozendal, Rene A. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter. Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 42, No. 23, 2008 Pp. 8630-8640 • Logan, B.E., Microbial Fuel Cells, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hobeken, New Jersey, 2008. • Macdonald, Averil and Berry, Martyn, Science through Hydrogen: Clean Energy for the Future,Heliocentris energiesysteme, 2004. Pp. 74, 80 • Melis, Anastasios, Green Alga Hydrogen production: progress, challenges and prospects. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. • Xing, Defeng, Zuo, Yi, Cheng, Shaoan, Regan, John M., Logan, Bruce E. Electricity Generation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris DX-1, Environmental Science and Technology Vol. 42, No. 11, 2008 Pp. 4146-4145