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  1. Seams Steering Group – Western InterconnectionPlanning Work Group - July 31, 2002 Western Utility Group – Western Regional Corridor Study Presenters: Gayle Gordon – BLM – (303) 239-3783 Bud Andersen – WUG - (775) 829-9931 • Carl Barnett – Saddle Mountain Consulting - (503) 755-2913 Bil Weigand – BLM – (208) 373-3862

  2. PRIORITY CORRIDOR PLANNING DISCUSSION OUTLINE • Western Utility Group – Background Information • BLM/FS - Background Information • ROW & Special Use Programs • National Energy Policy • BLM ROW Implementation Steps • Corridor Planning Review • Priority Corridor Project • Public Availability & Security Concerns • Questions - Answers

  3. Acreage Comparison by Agency Agency mm Acres BLM Surface acres 262 Mineral Estate 700 Forest Service 191 Fish & Wildlife Service 93 National Park Service 84 Army Corps of Engineers 12 Bureau of Reclamation 9 Totals 651

  4. BLM - The Agency • General Land Office - 1812 • DOI - 1849 • Grazing Service - 1934 • BLM - 1946 • Federal Land Policy & Mgmt Act - 1976 U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management

  5. USDA - Forest Service • Forest Reserves - 1891 • Organic Administration Act – 1897 • Transfer Act - 1905 • Multiple Use – Sustained Yield Act - 1960 • Federal Land Policy & Mgmt Act – 1976 • Title V -- Specifically • National Forest Management Act -- 1976 U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service

  6. Agency Missions BLM Mission: To sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. FS Mission: Caring for the Land & Serving People

  7. STATUTORY AUTHORITIES FOR SPECIAL USES AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY • Authorities for Forest Service Special Uses: • Title V of the Federal Land Policy & Management Act (FLPMA) • Section 28 of the Mineral Leasing Act (MLA) **PLUS 16 OTHER statutory authorities for the use and occupancy of NFS lands • Authorities for BLM’s Right-of-Way Administration: • Title V of FLPMA • Section 28 of the MLA

  8. Federal Land Policy & Management Act • Multiple Use Management - Sec. 103(c) • MUM is whatever the land use plan says it is, i.e., the mix of principal uses that maintains the health of the land • Public Involvement - Sec. 103(d) • means the opportunity for the participation by affected citizens in: • decision-making • rule-making • land use planning • Public Involvement is critical in development of all LUPs U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management

  9. Federal Land Policy & Management Act • Principal Uses (Sec. 103(l)) • livestock grazing • fish & wildlife development & utilization • mineral exploration and production • timber production • outdoor recreation • rights-of-way • Title V - Rights-of-Way U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management

  10. Right-of-Way AuthorizationsAre Either: • Linear Rights-of-Way • Site or Non-Linear Rights-of-Way The term “right-of-way” includes an easement, lease, permit, or license to occupy, use, or traverse public lands for purposes listed in Title V of the Federal Land Policy & Management Act.

  11. BLM ROW Program Data(ALL DATA AS OF 9/30/2001) • 86,845 Total Existing Authorizations & Acres • FLPMA/other: 62,985 -5.7million acres • MLA: 23,860 -0.25million acres • Type of ROW - No. – Acreage - Length (miles) • Power Lines: 12,655 - 490,500 acres - 40,466 miles • Oil and Gas: 22,665 - 233,000 acres - 38,446 miles • Telephone: 4,423 - 51,000 acres - 4,200 miles • Fiber Optic: 452 - 17,454 acres - 10,500 miles • Other Linear: 45,485 - 4.9 million acres

  12. BLM ROW Program Data(ALL DATA AS OF 9/30/2001) • Applications Processed and Grants Issued • FY 1999- 5,080 • FY 2000- 5,769 • FY 2001- 6,441 • FY 2001 Cost Recovery Fees • $6.9 Million • FY 2001 Rental Receipts • $9.4 Million • 42,909 ROW Grants Waived/Exempt from Rent

  13. Forest Service Special Uses Program Data • 45,000 Existing Authorizations (Non Recreation) • Power Lines: 2,750 • Telephone lines 1,400 • Comm. Sites: 4,225 • Other: 36,375 • ENCUMBERING MORE THAN 9 MM ACRES OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS • PRIVATE SECTOR INVESTMENTS OF MORE THAN $ 150 BILLION • Rent Collected- FY 2001 - $12,648,000+ • Power Lines: $1,690,000

  14. *Screening Criteria

  15. National Energy Policy • Release of the National Energy Policy – 5/17/01 • Executive Order 13211 - May 18, 2001 • (Regulations-Statement of Energy Effects) • Executive Order 13212 - May 18, 2001 • (Expedite Energy Projects) • (White House Task Force on Energy Siting) • Role for “Renewable” Energy Facilities in meeting nation’s energy needs

  16. Contains more than 100 recommendations for addressing the energy needs of the United States. THE NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY Energy Policy Implementation Tasks The FS has identified more than 25 tasks, while…. The BLM has identified more than 40 specific tasks.

  17. Implementing theNational Energy Policy BLM/FS Actions: NEP Implementation Steps • Establish ROW Project Manager positions • Provide for additional ROW training courses • Develop Policy for siting renewable energy facilities • Identify/remove administrative impediments • Finalize ROW cost recovery regulations • Give priority to energy ROW applications • Emphasize ROW planning and corridor designations

  18. 1. Establish ROW Project Manager Positions • Two national level Project Manager positions were established in November 2000 to manage major ROW projects on a bureauwide basis. • In response to recommendations in the National Energy Policy, BLM established two additional positions in May 2002.

  19. ROW PROJECT MANAGERS • LaVerne Steah – located in Utah State Office, Salt Lake City Phone: (801) 539-4114 Email: LaVerne_steah@blm.gov • Jerry Crockford – located in the Farmington NM, Field Office Phone: (505) 599-6333 Email: Jerry_Crockford@blm.gov

  20. ROW PROJECT MANAGERS • Tom Hurshman – located in Montrose, CO Field Office Phone: (970) 240-5345 Email: Tom_Hurshman@blm.gov • Scott Powers – located in the Montana State Office - Billings, Montana Phone: (406) 896-5319 Email: Scott_Powers@blm.gov

  21. 2. Provide for additional ROW training courses • During FY 2002/FY 2003, and in conjunction with industry, the FS/BLM will double the frequency of offerings of technical training courses to agency/industry personnel • Managing Major Rights-of-Way • Electric Systems Shortcourse • Pipeline Systems Shortcourse

  22. 3. Develop Policy for Siting Renewable Energy Facilities - BLM has worked with Wind Energy Industry in development of new policy and siting procedures for renewable energy facilities; • Interim policy was issued on July 29, 2002.

  23. 4. Identify/Remove Administrative Barriers to Energy Exploration, Development, & Siting of Energy Related Facilities • Work with the FERC and other agencies to minimize duplication in permitting oil and gas pipeline projects • Streamlining Environmental Processes • Interagency Working Group

  24. 5. Finalize Cost Recovery Rule (43 CFR 2800/2880) • BLM & the FS proposed new regulations in 1999 to: • Revise Cost Recovery Fees & Procedures • Adjusts cost recovery fees to reflect cost increases since 1987 • Federal Agencies subject to processing/monitoring fees • Add Inflation Adjustment Mechanism (IPD) • Clarify Category Definitions • Improve customer service by: • Establishing a customer service standard for timely processing of ROW applications; • Adding a “Master Agreement” provision to streamline processing and administrative procedures with a specific company; • Adding new provisions to improve the billing & collection of rent.

  25. ROLLOUT & IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FINAL REGULATIONS • Publish Final Rule - 2002 • Complete Development of New Agency Directives (Manuals/Handbooks) • Train Field Personnel • Educate Public (applicants and holders)

  26. 6. Prioritizing Energy ROW Applications • Sections 1 & 2 of Executive Order 13212 direct agencies to expedite review & completion of energy related projects; • Section 3 of the Order establishes the White House Task Force on Siting Energy Projects to assist agencies in their efforts to expedite the processing of energy-related ROW applications.

  27. 6. Prioritizing Energy ROW Applications • Executive Order 13211 directs agencies to prepare a Statement of Energy Effects when undertaking certain (rule-making) agency actions; • WO IM 2002 – 053 directs the preparation of a Statement of Energy Effects for any decision that is inconsistent with the National Energy Policy. For such a decision, the Authorized Officer must: • Provide rationale why energy-related use cannot co-exit with other uses; • Identify Alternatives considered; • Identify impacts of decision in regards to production lost, missed exploration opportunities, etc., & steps taken to offset losses. Statement of Adverse Energy Impact

  28. Implementing theNational Energy Policy BLM/FS Actions: NEP Implementation Steps • Establish ROW Project Manager positions • Provide for additional ROW training courses • Develop Policy for siting renewable energy facilities • Identify/remove administrative impediments • Finalize ROW cost recovery regulations • Give priority to energy ROW applications • Emphasize ROW planning and corridor designations

  29. National Forest Management Act 1976 • Directed Each National Forest to Develop Land and Resource Management Plans (LRMP’s) • Principles of Public Involvement and Public Disclosure in Decision-Making Similar to BLM • 2000/2001 - Forest Service Revised Its Planning Regulations • 85 of 127 Forest LRMP’s are Scheduled for Revision within the next 5 years U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service

  30. Resource Management Planning • 81 Planning/NEPA Efforts; 47 new starts – FY01; • 9 new starts in FY02 (plus 24 new plan revisions) • 21 – Time Sensitive Plans • New Land-Use Planning Guidance • H-1601-1/Manual 1601 • WO IM 2002-196 • LUP Decisions for ROWs will: • Identify “Closed” areas • Identify “Avoidance” areas • Identify “Open” areas • Make site designations • Make corridor designations

  31. Land Use Planning:A Management Tool • Management Plans Allocate Lands and Resources By: • Establishing Management Objectives, Standards, Guidelines, and Prescriptions • Designating Lands and and Resources for Specific Management Purposes • Examples: Wilderness, WSA’s, Recreation Sites • Designating Lands for Specific Land Uses • Examples: • COMMUNICATION SITES • UTILITY CORRIDORS

  32. 7. Emphasize ROW planning and corridor designations - Energy Land Use Plans • Action:Accelerate the completion of land-use plans with major energy-related components. • Status:Incorporating Presidential directives (National Energy Policy, EO 13212) into the planning process. (ongoing) • Status:Removing organizational constraints to ensure the timely completion of the plans - (ongoing) • Status:Revise/Supplement each agency’s directive’s system to emphasize the importance of identifying and designating utility and energy corridors in land management planning – (completed–WO IM 2002-196) • Status:Placed energy-related land use plans on a 2-3 year time schedule. (Time-sensitive Plans)(completed)

  33. High priority planning efforts that must be completed by 2004 to reflect congressional & administration priorities. Plans are driven by: Wildfire Management T/E Species Special Designations National Landscape Conservation System Recreation/OHV Need for Open Space Energy Development Corridor Planning Time Sensitive Plans

  34. Why Digitize the Corridor Study? • Supply/Demand • Few hard copies remain • Congressional Requests • Public Availability • Historical Use • Murkowski Request • New Spatial Technologies for Displaying Information • Can Become An Effective Planning Tool and/or • Decision Tool Why Update the Corridor Study?

  35. DIGITAL CORRIDOR STUDY OUTLINEhttp://ncarc.blm.gov/website/wug2 BLM Intranet Site • Corridor Study Text – By Chapter • Regional Map – Western U.S. • Layers: Visible or Active • Existing Corridors • Agency Designated Corridors • Proposed Corridors • Energy Sources • Constraints • State Boundaries • Water Features • Shaded Relief • View Features • Legend; Zoom; Identify; Pan; Find; Measurement; Set Units; Details

  36. DIGITAL CORRIDOR STUDY OUTLINE • State Maps – Western States • Layers: Visible or Active • Existing Corridors • Proposed Corridors • Agency Designated Corridors • Energy Sources • Constraints • Wild & Scenic Rivers • Land Status • BLM Planning Units • County Boundaries • State Boundaries • Congressional Districts • Cities • Roads • Major Water Features • Shaded Relief

  37. http://ncarc.blm.gov/website/wug2 1

  38. State Map 1

  39. Corridor Study Enhancement Opportunities “Old” Corridor Data Needs • Holder Information • NEPA Documentation/Environmental Constraints • Corridor and/or ROW Information • Location • Type of Authorized Uses • Width of Corridor or ROW • Compatible Uses within Corridor and/or ROW • Digital Maps “New” Priority Corridors • Western Utility Group Has Identified Several New “Priority Corridors” • Public Availability & Security Concerns

  40. Priority Corridor Criteria Priority Corridors are those that address: • Existing transmission constraints • Active requests (IPPs; current and future demand) • Existing and future land use constraints • Physical/Geographical • Socio/Political • Potential Energy Development • Supply to Market Priority Corridors have been categorized as follows: • Level 1 - Potential routes to be utilized in next 1-2 yrs. • Level 2 - Potential routes to be utilized in next 3-5 yrs. • Level 3 - Potential routes to be utilized in next 6-10 yrs.

  41. Level 1 Corridors – Potential routes to be utilized in next 1-2 yrs.

  42. Level 2 Corridors – Potential routes to be utilized in next 3-5 yrs.

  43. Level 3 Corridors – Potential routes to be utilized in next 6-10 yrs.

  44. Issues To Be Addressed Within Land Use Planning Process • Priority Corridor Attributes • Construction/Operating/Maintenance Standards • Scope of Designated Corridor • Existing Uses • Width • Proposed Uses • Compatiable Uses • New Uses • Resource Management Objectives (T&E) • Vegetative Management Objectives within corridor

  45. Bureau-wide Vegetation Management EIS Start – Oct. 2001 Finish – July 2003 19 Scoping Meetings – January 22 – March 12, 2002 - Scoping Comment Period ended March 29, 2002 ROW Contact – John Styduhar OR SO – 503-952-6454 Fax: 6422 For further information: www.blm.gov

  46. Other Planned Actions • Briefings/Coordination/Consultation • Broad Industry Review – IRWA • Western Electricity Coordinating Council • Western Governor’s Association • Federal Agencies • White House Energy Task Force/Chairman of CEQ • USDI/BLM Leadership – Field Personnel • USDA/USFS Leadership – Field Personnel • Department of Energy (Solicit Funding) • Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Solicit Funding) • Tribal Governments • Address “Security” Issue(s) • Solicit “Renewable” Energy Participation

  47. Corridors can only be designated within the Land Use Planning Process “Designated corridors” will: Allocate Rights-of-Way for Utility Corridor Purposes Help to Streamline the Evaluation and Analysis of Site-Specific Utility Proposals and Applications Provide Industry with Certainty for Infrastructure Planning Purposes Mitigate Existing and Prevent Future Transmission Bottlenecks Streamline/Expedite the Processing of Permits/Projects Serve as a Tool for Land Managers to Plan for and Consolidate Utility Rights-of-Way Uses “Designated corridors” must extend for entire length, irregardless of administrative jurisdictions – requires interagency coordination Corridor Planning Summary

  48. End Product: Updated, Digital, & Secure WESTERN REGIONAL CORRIDOR STUDY