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The Sociological Point of View. Unit 1. Why Sociology Matters. Definition of Sociology. Sociology is all around you. Whenever people interact with one another, it becomes an opportunity to study. Sociology is the social science that studies human society and social behavior.

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the sociological point of view

The Sociological Point of View

Unit 1

Why Sociology Matters

definition of sociology
Definition of Sociology

Sociology is all around you. Whenever people interact with one another, it becomes an opportunity to study. Sociology is the social science that studies human society and social behavior.

why study sociology
Why Study Sociology?

Why study sociology?

Most importantly because it can help you gain a new perspective, or view, of yourself and the world around you.

sociological perspective
Sociological Perspective

By adopting a sociological perspective, you can look beyond commonly held beliefs to the hidden meaning behind them.

All people are social beings.

sociological perspective1
Sociological Perspective

By adopting a sociological perspective, you can look beyond commonly held beliefs to the hidden meaning behind them.

Behavior is influenced by social factors.

sociological perspective2
Sociological Perspective

By adopting a sociological perspective, you can look beyond commonly held beliefs to the hidden meaning behind them.

You have learned your behavior from others.

sociological imagination
Sociological Imagination

The ability to see the connection between the larger world and your personal life.

The capacity to range from the most impersonal and remote topics to the most intimate features of the human self – and see the relations between the two.

theoretical perspectives
Theoretical Perspectives

Three Ways to Look at Societies

Functional Perspective

(Functionalism)

  • A society is a relatively integrated whole.
  • A society tends to seek stability.
  • Most aspects of society contribute to a society’s well being and survival.
  • Most people agree on what is best for society and work together to ensure that the social system runs smoothly.
theoretical perspectives1
Theoretical Perspectives

Three Ways to Look at Societies

Conflict Perspective

  • A society experiences inconsistency and conflict everywhere.
  • A society is continuously subjected to change.
  • A society involves the constraint and coercion of some members by others.
theoretical perspectives2
Theoretical Perspectives

Three Ways to Look at Societies

Interactionist Perspective(Symbolic Interactionism)

  • People’s interpretations of symbols are based on what they learn from others.
  • People base their interactions on their interpretations of symbols.
  • People gear their interactions to the behavior they believe others expect of them.
theoretical perspectives3
Theoretical Perspectives

Three Ways to Look at Societies

manifest function
Manifest Function
  • An action that produces an intended and recognized result, generally for the survival of a society.
  • Laws are examples of manifest functions to create order.
  • Schools are manifest functions designed to transmit culture
latent function
Latent Function
  • Latent functions are unintended and unrecognized.
  • A manifest function of schools is to teach math skills.
  • A latent function of schools is developing close friendships.
dysfunction
Dysfunction
  • Elements that have negative contributions to society are called dysfunctions.
  • Bureaucracies are designed to maintain order.
  • A dysfunction of a bureaucracy could be rigidity, impersonality or inefficiency
social darwinism and herbert spencer
Social Darwinism and Herbert Spencer
  • Spencer taught that evolutionary social change led to progress – provided that people don’t interfere.
  • It left alone, natural selection would ensure the survival of the fittest society.
  • Spencer opposed social reform laws because he saw them as interference and therefore harmful.
field study
FIELD STUDY

Become a careful observer of people.

Open your eyes to every day interactions with those around you. Think about what you observe and hear in response to your questions. Draw conclusions. Seek solutions.

Express your

opinions.

HAVE FUN!

field study1
FIELD STUDY

Interview at least 3adults of varying agesin Irving.

  • Ask what they think are some of the most pressing problems facing society in the United States today.
  • What suggestions do they have for solving these problems?
  • Use your sociological imagination to discuss how sociological research can help solve some of these challenges.
  • Remember to use the data sheets provided to record their names, the setting and date of the interviews, as well as their responses.
the sociological point of view1

The Sociological Point of View

Unit 1

Warm Up:

Finish up your student notebook, complete the rubric and turn it in.

Finish up your Field Study pages and complete the rubric.

Prepare for your presentation. You have 30 minutes before the presentations begin!