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McCrindle Research Pty Ltd

McCrindle Research Pty Ltd

McCrindle Research is a reputable research agency committed to conducting world class research and presenting the insights in innovative ways. It is spearheaded by renowned social researcher, demographer and commentator Mark McCrindle, whose expertise has brought McCrindle Research to the forefront when it comes to the latest market research, social trend analysis, generational studies and consumer insights.

By johnarthur101
(426 views)

Equity: Population Diversity 4 demographic & social trends redefining Australian society.

Equity: Population Diversity 4 demographic & social trends redefining Australian society.

Tuesday 31 May 2011 DiverseCity : Landcom 2011 Sustainability Conference. Equity: Population Diversity 4 demographic & social trends redefining Australian society. Mark McCrindle. Trend #1. Changing Population. Population growth and diversity Population older and younger.

By brina
(199 views)

Career, Job, or Personal Fulfillment? Understanding the New Generations at Work.

Career, Job, or Personal Fulfillment? Understanding the New Generations at Work.

Career, Job, or Personal Fulfillment? Understanding the New Generations at Work. 4C-able Future Seminar Friday 23 April 2004 Presented by Mark McCrindle. New Generations Who comprise today’s generations?. Description Birth Age _ (%) Builders Before 1945 59+ 17%

By arawn
(196 views)

Public Speaking for New Leaders [session 2]

Public Speaking for New Leaders [session 2]

Slideshow about Public Speaking for New Leaders [session 2] by markmccrindle

By markmccrindle
(967 views)

Managing Generation Y: Top 5 Attraction and Retention Factors, McCrindle Research

Managing Generation Y: Top 5 Attraction and Retention Factors, McCrindle Research

To attract and retain Gen Y in this high-turnover era we must meet their top 5 \nworkplace needs. This comes straight from our research of Australian Gen Y workers and in order of importance they look for:\n1. Work/Life Balance:\nFor Generation Y their job matters however it is not their life – but rather it provides \nfunds that fuel their life. In addition to their job they may also be juggling study, \nfriends, family, sport, other work and community involvements. So when it comes \nto their work schedule and overtime think: flexibility. \nRemember: if there’s a clash in the work-life balance, life wins!\n\n2. Workplace Culture:\nThis has to do with the relationships with others at work. For Generation Y social \nconnection with peers is one of the top retention factors. Not all of them have \nsupport from home so they are looking for a place to belong. \nRemember: they want community, not a workplace. Friends not just colleagues.\n\n3. Varied Job Role:\nGen Y like change - it’s all they’ve ever known. So offer variety in their job \ndescription and combine it with responsibility and promotions where possible.\nRemember: Many quit jobs not because there is a compelling reason to leave, \nbut because there is no compelling reason to stay.\n\n4. Management Style:\nThe ideal supervisor is one who values communication not just authority. One who \nleads by example and involvement and not just by command and control. Gen \nY’s are just beginning their careers so offer support, mentoring, positive feedback \nand public recognition. \nAs John Maxwell says “If you’re leading, and no one’s following – then you’re just out for a walk”.\n\n5. Training:\nGeneration Y know that in the 21st Century it is essential to keep their skills up \nto date. In fact 90% of Generation Y’s who receive regular training from their \nemployer are motivated to stay with their employer. \nSo today training is more than a tool for productivity – it is a tool for retention.

By markmccrindle
(1536 views)

A Look Ahead to 2020: 6 Key Trends Impacting Business and Society

A Look Ahead to 2020: 6 Key Trends Impacting Business and Society

A key part of the environmental scans we conduct for organisations and industries, and the research analysis that we are commissioned to conduct involves identifying and tracking emerging trends.\n\nHere we’ve compiled the Top 6 Trends which will have an impact as we approach 2020. It’s no longer enough to just observe the changing times, business leaders have to understand the shifts and be prepared ahead of times to respond to the changes.\nMcCrindle Research: Know the Times www.mccrindle.com.au

By markmccrindle
(1513 views)

Australia at 23,000,000: Our Population Demographically Defined

Australia at 23,000,000: Our Population Demographically Defined

23 Million on 23 April 2013\nAustralia’s population growth has accelerated in recent months and will reach the population milestone of 23 million earlier than expected.\nWith twice as many births as deaths, and with overseas migration arrivals having increased by 13.8% in a year, Australia is now growing by 1,048 people per day.\nBased on these current growth trends, Australia will hit 23 million at 9.57pm (AEST) on Tuesday 23 April 2013.\n\nDoubling the Population\nAustralia’s population reached 11.5 million in 1966 and so it has taken less than 47 years to double to 23 million. The global population doubled at a slightly faster rate, hitting 3.5 billion in 1968 and reaching 7 billion in late 2011, a period of just over 43 years.\n\nIncreasing Growth Rate:\nThe latest demographic data from the ABS shows that Australia’s national population growth rate has increased from 1.6% to 1.7% per year. This is above that of the world (1.1%), well above China (0.5%), UK (0.6%), USA (0.9%) and even above countries that traditionally had high birth rates such as Vietnam (1.1%), India (1.4%) and Malaysia (1.6%).\n\nBig Numbers\nWhile an annual population growth rate of 1.7% doesn’t sound huge, it is well above the forecast of a decade ago (around 1%) and equates to a population increase equivalent to one new Canberra or three new Darwin’s per year.\n\nRecord Births:\nAustralia’s total fertility rate has risen each year over the last 3 years and is now 1.9. The total number of births continues to set new records and in the last 12 months has exceeded 300,000 for the first time ever (303,600).\n\nTwice as many Births as Deaths.\nWhile the birth rate has been growing, the death rate has been declining. The Standardised Death Rate (deaths per 1,000 population) has fallen to 5.59 (although the Individualised Death Rate is still 100%!)\n\nWhile total annual births exceed 300,000, annual deaths number 149,100.\nPopulation Growth from Migration exceeds that from Natural Increase.\nPermanent overseas arrivals are expected to break the half-million mark this year, falling just short of this at 488,100 in the last 12 months. Permanent departures rose slightly to 260,100 giving a Net Overseas Migration figure of 228,000, an increase of almost one-third (32.2%) on the previous year.\nThe proportion of population growth contributed by migration has increased in a year from 54% to 60% and the proportion from natural increase has declined from 46% to 40%.\n\nAustralia’s Ageing Continues:\nIn just two decades Australia’s median age has increased nearly 5 years (from 32.7 to 37.5 today).\nIn the last 5 years the proportion of our population aged under 20 has declined by a percentage point to be just 1 in 4 Australians (25%) while the proportion aged over 60 has increased by a similar amount to be 1 in 5 (20%). Based on these current demographic trends, by 2028, for the first time in Australia’s history there will be more people aged over 60 than aged under 20.

By markmccrindle
(999 views)

Social Biz 2014 Understanding 21st Century Consumers 18 February 2014 Mark McCrindle

Social Biz 2014 Understanding 21st Century Consumers 18 February 2014 Mark McCrindle

The 21st century consumer; The times are changing faster than ever – technologically, demographically, socially, and economically. We need to understand what influences the 21st Century Consumer. What is the real value of Social Media? What are the trends? What are the consumption patterns? What are the generational differences? What are the emerging segment opportunities?

By markmccrindle
(1048 views)

National Medicines Symposium 2014 Mark McCrindle

National Medicines Symposium 2014 Mark McCrindle

THE HEALTH LANDSCAPE IN 2025\nWhile the last decade has brought massive change to Australia, the confluence of the mega trends currently impacting our nation and the region will be transformative. The health landscape as we move towards 2025 will be impacted by these changes demographically, socially, technologically and generationally. \nDemographic Change \nWithin a decade, life expectancy at birth will be 10 years greater than it was in 1984, and the population aged over 85 will be five times larger than it was three decades ago.\nAlong with Australia’s population growth which is numerically at an all-time high, this ageing will place strains on the health and aged care system at a time when the workforce is also ageing. In 1970 there were 15 people in the working age population relative to each couple of retirement age while today this ratio has shrunk to less than 10 per retired couple and the labour shortfalls are even more acute in the health sector with its workforce age profile. \nSocial trends\nThe global connectivity, cultural diversity, ongoing urbanisation and densification and population mobility which marks Australia will all continue to raise the role and influence Australia’s health sector has in the region. Emerging expectations and attitudes that coincide with these transformative social shifts will have a significant impact on the demand and delivery of health services and research. \nGenerational Transitions\nThe future of the health landscape is shaped not just by demographic and social change but generational changes. The health sector is experiencing the biggest generational change since the birth of the post-war Baby Boomers – increasingly Baby Boomers are downshifting, Generation X and Y re the emerging managers, and Generation Z are today’s new health workforce. The need to train, recruit and retain the emerging generations is a key challenge facing the health sector and the next decade will see the biggest intergenerational leadership transfer the workforce has ever experienced. \nTechnology Innovations\nOver the coming decades, the impact of technology in the research of the advancement of medical screening, diagnostics and treatment will see the potential for thousands of Australians to attain health measures never before achievable. The way in which patient information is stored, processed, and accessed will be a transformative shifts. Communication in these times of rapid technological transformation and message saturation will require new and engaging communication strategies.\nWhile we cannot predict the future, we can identify the trends and respond to the emerging shifts taking place all around us. In so doing we can all implement strategic changes that will collectively shape the future of Australia’s health landscape.

By markmccrindle
(1991 views)

Parenting the i generation mark mccrindle

Parenting the i generation mark mccrindle

Gen Zeds are the most formally educated generation in Australian history – not only have they started their schooling younger, they are also projected to stay in it for longer. Whilst 1 in 10 of the Builders generation have a university degree, 1 in 5 Baby Boomers, 1 in 4 Generation Xers and 1 in 3 Gen Ys, it is projected that 1 in 2 Gen Zeds will be university educated. With the increased focus on formal education and the increased time spent behind screens and on digital devices, it is unsurprising that they live largely indoors; after all, their parents place priority on homework, coaching and extra-curricular activities over a carefree childhood. These sedentary lifestyles are having an impact on our Gen Zeds – based on the current trends, it is projected that in 2027, when all Gen Z have reached adulthood, 77.9% of males and 61.2% of females will be overweight or obese.\n\nHowever when it comes to getting outdoors and getting active, Gen Zeds have their favourite sports – with Gen Z males top sports being soccer (17%), AFL (15%) and Basketball (10%), and for Gen Z females, their top sports are netball (21%), dance (15%) followed by swimming (9%).\n\nThe Zeds are up-ageing because they are growing up faster. In less than a century, the onset of puberty in girls has gone from 14.6 years (1920) to 10.5 years today, with the trend similar for boys, with puberty on setting before the age of 12. They are also in education earlier and are exposed to marketing younger. Despite the environmentally conscientious times, the Zeds are the most marketed-to children of all time and the biggest consumers of any generation of children.\n\nThis Internet-savvy, technologically literate generation has been shaped to multitask. They move quickly from one task to another, often placing more value on speed than accuracy. They have only known a wireless, hyperlinked, user-generated world where they are only ever a few clicks away from any piece of knowledge. The world is an open book to Gen Z.\n\nOver the lifetime of a Gen Zed, technology has transformed our society. When the oldest Gen Zeds were 2 years of age in 1997, Google.com was registered as a domain, and when they turned 5, USB flash drives and Nokia 3310 mobile phones were on the market.\n\nHere’s a summary technology timeline in the life of a Gen Z:\n\nTECHNOLOGY TIMELINE 1995 TO 2014\n1997: Google.com is registered as a domain\n1998: Portable MP3 players enter the market\n2000: USB flash drives become available, Nokia 3310 launched\n2001: Wikipedia is launched\n2003: MySpace is launched\n2005: YouTube is launched\n2006: Facebook opens to the public\n2006: Twitter is launched\n2007: Dropbox founded\n2007: First iPhone released\n2009: Whatsapp founded\n2010: iPad is launched\n2010: Instagram launched\n2012: Facebook has 1 billion active users\n2014: Google Glass launched

By markmccrindle
(1137 views)

Top 5 Characteristics Defining the Changing Times & New Generations 7 November 2014

Top 5 Characteristics Defining the Changing Times & New Generations 7 November 2014

Slideshow about Top 5 Characteristics Defining the Changing Times & New Generations 7 November 2014 by markmccrindle

By markmccrindle
(2347 views)

The future of supermarket shopping in australia mark mccrindle

The future of supermarket shopping in australia mark mccrindle

A snapshot of the future of retail, the emerging generations, ever changing consumers and technology.

By markmccrindle
(1923 views)

California transit association workshop slideshare 13 november 2014

California transit association workshop slideshare 13 november 2014

Leading times in changing times: Recruiting, retaining & motivating diverse generations\nIn a world of flat structures and consultative practices, coaching and mentoring has replaced commanding and controlling. This session delivers the latest findings on how to effectively motivate and lead teams in these 21st Century times. It provides an overview of the world’s best HR practices for today: from attracting and engaging with the globally-minded millennials to management practices that connect with an intergenerational workforce.

By markmccrindle
(1147 views)

Unlocking the power of data through visualisation

Unlocking the power of data through visualisation

Unlocking the power of data through research visualisation:
In a world of big data- there is a need for visual data. Research is at its best when it is not just in a report but on an infographic, in an interactive app, or on a wall. Here\'s the what, why and how of data visualisation.

By markmccrindle
(2074 views)

Leading teams in changing times slideshare

Leading teams in changing times slideshare

Leadership\nFor Gen Z, a shift in leadership has occurred where influencing Gen Z’s has changed from experts who were older and authoritarian to leaders who inspire and engage.\n\nAn effective leader is someone who can communicate rationally, connect relationally, manage practically and lead directionally and strategically. Effective leaders demonstrate not just IQ but EQ – they share knowledge and information yet understand emotion and connection.\n\nA recent McCrindle Research study surveyed over 580 Australian on their desired leadership styles and the characteristic values they would like to see in their ideal leader.\n\nLeadership: Most important factors in growth or decline\n\nWhen asked to comment on the factor which has the largest impact on determining whether a business grows and flourishes or struggles and declines, the number 1 response of Australians, given by 38% of respondents, was that leadership and management determine these outcomes.\n\nThe tasks of direction setting, leading the team, and managing business movements that determine the success or failure of the business are primarily dependant on the leadership and management team, Australians noted. 34% of Australians stated that employees – particularly their attitudes and work ethics – have the largest impact on determining business growth or decline, followed by products and services (17%), suppliers and clients (7%), and systems and procedures (5%).\n\n\n\n \n\nLeader authority versus team participation and ownership\n\nAustralians prefer greater levels of team participation and ownership over leadership authority. 57% of Australians surveyed indicated that they prefer a high level of team participation and ownership, compared with 45% who prefer a high level of leader authority.\n\nThe ideal Australian leadership is an environment in which team participation is encouraged and direction is given by strong leadership – only 3% of Australians indicated a preference for low levels of leadership involvement, and only 2% indicated a low level of team participation. In fact, when asked about flexible working options in the workplace, 96% of Australians deemed it necessary to gather and collaborate in order to achieve maximum output and develop cultural cohesion.\n\nIdeal leadership values\n\nWhen Australians were asked to rank the leadership values of their ideal leader, competence was ranked as the highest priority. Australians prefer a leader who is driven towards outcomes and objectives, with ambitious being the second-ranked ideal leadership value. Broad-mindedness was next on the list, with Australians desiring to be led by individuals who are open to new ideas, innovation, and change. Australians ranked caring as fourth, showing a desire for empathy in their working environment. Cooperation also made it into the Top 5 ideal leadership values, showing the Aussie desire for mutual teamwork.

By markmccrindle
(329 views)


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