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GEOMORPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE LUCKIAMUTE WATERSHED, CENTRAL COAST RANGE, OREGON: INTEGRATING APPLIED WATERSHED SCIENCE WITH UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH. Steve Taylor Earth and Physical Sciences Department Western Oregon University Monmouth, Oregon 97361. Introduction

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slide1

GEOMORPHIC ANALYSIS OF THE LUCKIAMUTE WATERSHED, CENTRAL COAST RANGE, OREGON:

INTEGRATING APPLIED WATERSHED SCIENCE WITH UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Steve Taylor

Earth and Physical Sciences Department Western Oregon University

Monmouth, Oregon 97361

slide2

Introduction

    • Watersheds as Undergraduate Service Learning Laboratories
    • Geomorphic Significance of the central Oregon Coast Range
  • Luckiamute River Study Area
  • Results of Geomorphic Analyses
  • Summary and Conclusion
slide4

WATERSHEDS AS SERVICE LEARNING LABORATORIES:

Natural outdoor science laboratories with defined boundaries

Local, place-based contextual learning facilities

Promote university-community linkages

Complex multivariate systems w/ process-response feedbacks

Amenable to quantitative techniques and geospatial technology

slide5

SIGNIFICANCE OF THE LUCKIAMUTE WATERSHED TO WOU:

“THE” local WOU watershed, socially relevant

Close proximity to campus, logistically accessible

Amenable to long-term studies in fluvial geomorphology,

environmental geology, conservation biology, and hydrology

Opportunities for cross-collaboration and community outreach

slide6

SUMMARY OF LONG-TERM RESEARCH AND COMMUNITY

SERVICE INITIATIVES IN THE LUCKIAMUTE BASIN

1999-Present WOU Earth Science-Biology-Chemistry Class Field Trips and Contextual Learning Modules (Fluvial Geomorphology, Geologic Mapping, Hydrogeology, Environmental Geology, Botany, Aquatic Invertebrates, Environmental Chemistry, Water Quality, Geographic Information Systems)

2001 Environmental Science Institute Course

(Geomorphology, Env. Chemistry, Botany, Climatology)

2002 Proposal Development (Watershed Learning Model)

2003-2004 Watershed Assessment with Luckiamute Watershed Council

2003-Present Community Support of Luckiamute Watershed Council

2004-Present Funded Research: Hydrogeomorphic Analysis (USGS / CWest)

2004-Present Funded Research: Spatial Distribution of Invasive Plants (OCF)

slide7

Geomorphic Significance of the Oregon Coast ange

Oregon Coast Range

Unglaciated, forested landscape

Paleogene-Neogene marine volcanic and sedimentary rocks (Walker and MacLeod, 1991)

Long history of oblique convergence and tectonic accretion (Wells et al., 1984)

Active mountain building during the past 10-15 Ma (Snavely et al., 1993)

Pleistocene uplift rates = 0.1-0.3 mm/yr (Kelsey et al., 1996)

Historic uplift rates = 1-3 mm/yr (Mitchell et al., 1994)

Eastward tilting = 1 x 10-8 rad/yr (Adams, 1984)

Holocene erosion rates = 0.05-0.33 mm/yr (Roering et al., 2005)

Study

Area

slide8

SAMPLINIG OF PREVIOUS WORK IN TYEE LANDSCAPES OF “THE OCR”

University of Washington – UC Berkeley Geomorphic Offspring and Related Cousins

Pierson (1977) Debris flow processes

Dietrich and Dunne (1978) Sediment budgets

Jackson and Beschta (1982) Bedload transport

Burroughs (1985) Landslide modeling

Dietrich and others (1986) Hillslope processes

Montgomery and Dietrich (1988) Landscape evolution

Benda (1990) Debris flow processes

Benda and Cundy (1990) Debris flow processes

Reneau and Dietrich (1990) Debris flow processes

Reneau and Dietrich (1991) Landscape evolution

Personius and others (1993) Terrace chronologies

Montgomery and Dietrich (1994) Landslide modeling

Benda and Dunne (1997) Debris flow processes

Montgomery and others (1997) Hillslope process experiments

Roering and others (1999) Hillslope process experiments

Montgomery and others (2000) Landslide modeling

Heimsath and others (2001) Weathering processes

Schmidt and others (2001) Slope stability

Anderson and others (2002) Weathering processes

May (2002) Debris flow processes

Casebeer (2003) Sediment budgets

Lancaster and Hayes (2003) Debris flow processes

May and Gresswell (2003) Sediment production

Roering and others (2003) Slope stability

Schmidt and others (2003) Slope Stability

Kobor and Roering (2004) Bedrock-channel processes

Roering and others (2005) Slope processes / Landscape Evolution

slide9

Study Area

Salem

Oregon

Luckiamute

Study Area

Focus of Existing

Coast Range

Studies (27+ yrs)

Eugene

Coos Bay

Tyee Fm

Outcrop Belt

(Eocene, arkosic ss,

delta-submarine fan)

0 50 km

slide13

Yamhill

Domain

(23%)

Spencer

Domain (29%)

Tyee

Domain (29%)

Siletz Domain (19%)

0 5 km

Hillslope-

Colluvial

Valley Floor-

Alluvial

Hillslope-

Colluvial

Hillslope-

Colluvial

slide15

Luckiamute River at Helmick State Park

Bankfull Stage 3/27/05 3800 cfs

slide16

Spencer-Valley Fill Domain

Ts

el 470 ft

Max Missoula Flood El. = 400 ft)

el 220 ft

Qtm (Bela, 1981)

Qff2 (O’Connor et al., 2001)

Willamette Silt

slide17

Siletz Domain

Spencer Domain

slide18

Willamette Valley

Yamhill-Intrusive Domain

slide22

Total Luckiamute

Ad = 815 km2

Avg Subbasin

Ad = 10-20 km2

methodology
Methodology
  • GIS analysis of USGS 10-m DEMs
  • Software: ArcGIS and Terrain Analysis System (TAS v1.5; Lindsay, 2002)
  • Subbasin boundaries and channel network derived by the Coastal Landscape Analysis and Modeling (CLAMS) group at PNW Forest Research Lab (Miller et al., 2001)
slide24

Average

Median

slide25

Average

Median

slide26

Summary of Slope Parameters for the Luckiamute Watershed

Valley Fill- Siletz Yamhill- Tyee

Spencer Intrusive

Max Slope 56.8o 61.9o 59.0o 62.0o

Avg Slope 3.2o 12.7o 11.9o 14.5o

Std Dev 3.98o 7.90o 7.97o 9.18o

Variance 15.84o 62.49o 63.51o 84.25o

90th 9o 24o 24o 28o

Percentile

% Cells >20o 0.7 18.3 15.4 25.9

% Cells >25o 0.2 7.7 7.9 14.3

No. Cells 2290702 1510287 1926899 2409140

slide28

Little Luckiamute

Tyee Domain

Luckiamute

Yamhill Domain

slide30

Tyee Domain in the Luckiamute Basin:

  • Steeper, rugged hillslopes
  • More finely dissected by low-order channels
  • Tendency to spawn debris flow
  • Lower stream-power index compared to Yamhill Domain
  • Higher average valley widths, increased sediment accommodation space
  • Working Hypotheses for Tyee Domain:
  • Hillslope transport rates are greater
  • than the ability of the channel
  • system to export sediment
  • Steep hillslopes and increased
  • valley widths result in comparative
  • decrease of net sediment-transport
  • efficiency
slide31

Concluding Statements

(1)

The Luckiamute Watershed represents a model outdoor laboratory for contextual and service learning opportunities in the Natural Sciences at Western Oregon University

Geomorphic analysis suggests that spatial variation of bedrock lithology is a primary factor controlling slope gradients, hillslope delivery rates, and resulting sediment-transport efficiency of the channel system.

The Luckiamute Watershed is uniquely positioned at the northern terminus of the Tyee outcrop belt, thus providing an opportunity for comparative geomorphic analysis.

The rich body of work from other Tyee landscapes in the OCR will serve as the platform from which to extend future research into other bedrock domains.

(2)

(3)

(4)

slide32

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Funding Sources:

OSU Institute for Water and Watersheds (IWW)

USGS Water Resources Small-Grants Program

Oregon Community Foundation

Western Oregon University Faculty Development Fund

WOU Student Research Assistants:

Diane Hale, Jeff Budnick, Jamie Fisher, Chandra Drury,

Katie Knoll, Rachel Pirot, Jeff Kent

WOU Faculty Colleagues

2001 Environmental Science Institute: Bryan Dutton (Biology), Pete Poston (Chemistry), Jeff Myers (Earth Science), Adele Schepige (Education)

Ongoing Research Collaboration: Bryan Dutton (Biology)