slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Standard 3.8 Interpret and evaluate the impact of ambiguities, subtleties, contradictions, ironies, and incongruities. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Standard 3.8 Interpret and evaluate the impact of ambiguities, subtleties, contradictions, ironies, and incongruities.

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 12

Standard 3.8 Interpret and evaluate the impact of ambiguities, subtleties, contradictions, ironies, and incongruities. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 149 Views
  • Uploaded on

Standard 3.8 Interpret and evaluate the impact of ambiguities, subtleties, contradictions, ironies, and incongruities. Irony. Number of Questions.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Standard 3.8 Interpret and evaluate the impact of ambiguities, subtleties, contradictions, ironies, and incongruities.' - ryo


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1
Standard 3.8 Interpret and evaluate the impact of ambiguities, subtleties, contradictions, ironies, and incongruities.

Irony

number of questions
Number of Questions

The literary response and analysis section of the CAHSEE contains 20 multiple choice questions.There are two questions on the CAHSEE that ask questions regarding your understanding of standard 3.8

purpose
Purpose

Understanding irony within the text allows you to better understand the deeper meaning--the humor, the tragedy--of the piece

what is irony
What is Irony?

Irony-a contradictory

statement or situation.

types of irony
Types of Irony

There are 3 different types of irony:

  • Verbal irony
  • Situational irony
  • Dramatic irony
verbal irony
Verbal Irony

Verbal irony happens when a character says one thing but means the opposite.

Tips: Usually verbal irony also has an ironic tone.

verbal irony example
Verbal Irony - Example

For example, in Julius Caesar, Mark Antony repeats the words "and Brutus is an honorable man" in the famous “Friends, Romans, countrymen” speech. Mark Antony’s meaning, however, is that Brutus is completely dishonorable because Brutus, Caesar’s best friend, joined the other conspirators and plunged a knife into Caesar’s chest.

Note: Verbal irony may be confused with sarcasm, but sarcasm is harsh and direct, while verbal irony is implied.

situational irony
Situational Irony

Situational irony- when what happens in the story is the opposite of what is expected to occur.

situational irony1
Situational Irony

In Guy de Maupassant’s story “The Necklace” the main character works for years to replace an expensive necklace she borrowed and lost only to learn years later that the necklace was a fake.

What makes this situation ironic?

dramatic irony
Dramatic Irony

Dramatic irony- happens when the reader has information that one or more of the characters does not have.

Tip: Dramatic irony involves more than just spoken words.

dramatic irony example
Dramatic Irony Example

In Othello, dramatic irony occurs when Othello refers to Iago as “honest Iago.” Unknown to Othello, Iago is a villain who deceives him into thinking that Desdemona (Othello’s wife) has been unfaithful. For this, Othello unjustly kills his wife, believing the whole time in Iago’s honesty.

(The audience knows the situation better than the character in the play--and feels the agony as an onlooker.)

situational dramatic ironies
Situational/Dramatic Ironies

Note the difference in examples for verbal and dramatic irony:

Antony calls Brutus “honorable” and knows he is not honorable, while Othello calls Iago “honest” and does not know of Iago’s deceit, his dishonesty.