hans christian andersen and the discourse of the dominated jack zipes n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
“Hans Christian Andersen and the Discourse of the Dominated” Jack Zipes PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
“Hans Christian Andersen and the Discourse of the Dominated” Jack Zipes

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 6

“Hans Christian Andersen and the Discourse of the Dominated” Jack Zipes - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 94 Views
  • Uploaded on

“Hans Christian Andersen and the Discourse of the Dominated” Jack Zipes. Jessica Brumley, Alliah Davis, & Alexandra Wolfe. Thesis.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about '“Hans Christian Andersen and the Discourse of the Dominated” Jack Zipes' - roger


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
hans christian andersen and the discourse of the dominated jack zipes

“Hans Christian Andersen and the Discourse of the Dominated”Jack Zipes

Jessica Brumley, Alliah Davis, & Alexandra Wolfe

thesis
Thesis
  • Jack Zipes discusses how Hans Christian Andersen’s desire and struggle to ascend his social position in 19th century Europe significantly influenced the synthesis of his literature.
hans christian anderson struggled with his integration into the upper class
Hans Christian Anderson struggled with his integration into the upper class
  • Hans Christian Anderson strongly desired to be completely accepted by upper class nobility
  • Despite Hans Christian Anderson’s great success as a writer, his proletarian family background restrained his efforts to rise from the dominated class and into the dominating circle. This inspired his belief in natural nobility.
  • “…he devoutly believed that certain biologically determined people were chosen by divine providence to rise above others.” Zipes, 248.
  • Andersen rationalized his need for recognition by the upper classes by asserting his own artistry as God given gifts that merited his progression in social hierarchy
slide4
Hans Christian Andersen infused his own dominated life into his tales by demonstrating a common thread
  • Andersen was born in a ‘Lumpenproletariat” society
  • “In almost all of Andersen’s early tales, he focuses on lower-class or disenfranchised protagonists, who work their way up and into society.” Zipes, 279
  • His tales are essential because they exposed similar motifs such as ““significance of providence, the essence of geniality, the role of the artist, the treatment of women, and the system of patronage.” Zipes, 271
slide5
Hans Christian Anderson appealed to the lower class because he spoke from his own experience and struggles
      • “Everything In It’s Right Place” Zipes, 293.
  • “The Gardener and His Master” Zipes, 298.
      • “Andersen’s genius, despite his servility, rested in his inability to prevent himself from loathing all that he admired.” Zipes, 303.
evaluation
evaluation
  • Jack Zipes makes an excellent argument establishing Hans Christian Andersen’s conflict with social order and how it translated into his literary tales. The evidence he uses, including excerpts from the works of NoëlleBisseret, Finn Hauberg Mortensen, and Hans Christian Andersen himself enhance his argument by giving the reader a stronger insight into 19th century Europe and motive behind Andersen’s work. In addition, Zipes’ use of Andersen’s actual literary fairy tales into his argument to connect his assertions could probably convince the most skeptical readers. Jack Zipes' argument relates to other scholarship's such as "Hansel and Gretel" and "Molly Whoopie" because hidden within these other fairy tales is a symbolic struggle with being lower class.