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F. Scott Fitzgerald’s

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  1. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

  2. F. Scott Fitzgerald • We will watch the A&E Biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald during chapter 4. • 1896-1940 • Born in Minnesota • Major writer of the Jazz Age in the 1920’s

  3. Long Island Map – Also see page 206 in our novel

  4. Nick Carraway – the narrator • Appearance- • Actions- • Thoughts- • carraway seeds- Often found in rye bread, carraway seeds are long, narrow, and have hard, brown shells. A&E’s The Great Gatsby

  5. Daisy Buchanan • Appearance- • Actions- • Thoughts- • daisies – flowers, usually white considered simple but beautiful Mia Farrow as Daisy

  6. Tom Buchanan • Appearance- • Actions- • Thoughts- A&E’s The Great Gatsby

  7. Jay Gatsby • Appearance- • Actions- • Thoughts- • gaspiller (v.) French word meaning “to waste.” Robert Redford as Gatsby

  8. Jordan Baker • Appearance- • Actions- • Thoughts- A&E’s The Great Gatsby

  9. Myrtle Wilson • Appearance- • Actions- • Thoughts- • myrtle- an evergreen shrub with black berries. Sacred to Aphrodite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrtle)

  10. George Wilson • Appearance- • Actions- • Thoughts-

  11. Cooperative Groups • Cooperative Grouping Rubric – • Yes, this is being graded.

  12. Chapter 1 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look the many ways our narrator is characterized. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text.

  13. What Nick says Chapter 1 Character Study - Nick Nick’s Feelings What Nick thinks Who Nick likes Professional Information Father’s Advice Who he dislikes What he does

  14. Chapter 2 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look at how eyes are an important symbol throughout this novel and track causes and effects in this chapter. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text. I spy…

  15. Ch 2 – Eyes Point of View Dr. T.J. Eckleburg For each set of eyes, 1.) how are they described and 2.) what do they see (what is their point of view) Which character’s eyes are not described at all? What do you think of that? Tom Daisy George Wilson

  16. Ch 2 – Cause and Effect Tom’s party

  17. Chapter 3 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look at Gatsby’s characterization and at the extended metaphor of careless drivers. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text. Authentic 1920’s Flappers

  18. Chapter 3- Gatsby Character Study Things he says Predictions about him Likes Secrets Goals Dislikes Rumors Actions

  19. Chapter 3- Careless Drivers • A metaphor is a __________________. • How are careless drivers mentioned and shown in this chapter? • - • - • - • - • What does this metaphor foreshadow? What hint should characters take from these events and conversations?

  20. Chapter 4 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look at the role of criminal activities in this novel and compare Nick and Gatsby to our author. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text. Al Capone at the game.

  21. Ch 4 – Compare/Contrast Gatsby Nick F. Scott Fitzgerald

  22. Chapter 4 Gangster Background • Details of how in 1913 gangster Rosy Rosenthal was killed in a hail of machinegun bullets as he stepped outside the dining room of the old Metropol Hotel, now the Casablanca, to become the nation's first "drive-by shooting." http://bearmanormedia.bizland.com/id88.html • Web site about Beansie Rosenthal murdered like Rosy in chapter 4 http://crimemagazine.com/killercop.htm

  23. More Background Info • The 1919 World Series resulted in the most famous scandal in baseball history. Eight players from the Chicago White Sox (later nicknamed the Black Sox) were accused of throwing the series against the Cincinnati Reds. Details of the scandal and the extent to which each man was involved have always been unclear. It was, however, front-page news across the country and, despite being acquitted of criminal charges, the players were banned from professional baseball for life. The eight men included the great "Shoeless" Joe Jackson; pitchers Eddie Cicotte and Claude "Lefty" Williams; infielders Buck Weaver, Arnold "Chick" Gandil, Fred McMullin, and Charles "Swede" Risberg; and outfielder Oscar "Happy" Felsch. http://www.chicagohistory.org/history/blacksox.html

  24. There are few excuses for the behavior of Jewish gangsters in the 1920s and 1930s. The best known Jewish gangsters – Meyer Lansky, Bugsy Siegel, Longy Zwillman, Moe Dalitz — were involved in the numbers rackets, illegal drug dealing, prostitution, gambling and loan sharking. They were not nice men. During the rise of American Nazism in the 1930s and when Israel was being founded between 1945 and 1948, however, they proved staunch defenders of the Jewish people. The roots of Jewish gangsterism lay in the ethnic neighborhoods of the Lower East Side; Brownsville, Brooklyn; Maxwell Street in Chicago; and Boyle Heights in Los Angeles. Like other newly arrived groups in American history, a few Jews who considered themselves blocked from respectable professions used crime as a means to "make good" economically. The market for vice flourished during Prohibition and Jews joined with others to exploit the artificial market created by the legal bans on alcohol, gambling, paid sex and narcotics. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/US-Israel/gangsters.html

  25. Gangsters Continued • Raising the question about Jewish attitudes toward Jewish criminals, Baumgarten observed that almost no Jewish criminals appear in the serious writing of major American Jewish writers. Yet non-Jewish writers have not been so diffident. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby," he said, Arnold Rothstein, fictionalized as Meyer Wolfsheim, fixes the 1919 World Series. http://www.jewishsf.com/content/2-0-/module/displaystory/story_id/10121/edition_id/193/format/html/displaystory.html

  26. Now, what’s the point?Quick Writes-Pair-Share • What is the author’s purpose (LT08) for including historically accurate information about Gatsby’s criminal dealings? • What is the point of making Gatsby a criminal? • How many heroes can you think of who are the “bad guy?”

  27. Chapter 5 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look at the role of wealth in this novel: who has it, who wants it, and what people will do to get it. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text.

  28. Chapter 5 – Signs of Wealth Nouveau Riche: Old Money: Conspicuous Consumption:

  29. Chapter 6 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look at the similarities and differences between Tom and Jay. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text.

  30. Chapter 6 Compare/Contrast Tom Gatsby

  31. Chapter 7 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look at cause and effect in this pivotal chapter. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text. Broadway in 1920’s – see the eyes?

  32. Chapter 7 Flow Chart – Cause & Effect Tom!

  33. Chapter 8 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look at the plot sequence of this dramatic chapter. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text. Toby Stephens played Gatsby in the A&E movie

  34. Chapter 8- Cliffhanger How does chapter 8 begin? What happens during chapter 8? How does chapter 8 end?

  35. Ch 8 – Wheel of GuiltTake a Spin! Myrtle Daisy Gatsby Wilson Jordan Tom Nick

  36. Chapter 9 Goals • Content Goal – We’ll take a look at how our opinions of characters have changed and why. • Language Goal – We will read, write, listen, and speak in cooperative groups to understand the text.

  37. Ch 9 –Opinions in Decline: Why do we learn to dislike each character? Tom Nick Meyer Wolfsheim Jordan Daisy Why do we learn to like Gatsby more than ever?

  38. COE LC01- unattainable goals LC02- summarize steps Gatz took to become Gatsby LC03- predict would Gatsby be happy with Daisy LA05- How do illegal activities contribute to the conflict? LA06- c/c Tom and Gatsby LA07- c/e Who kills Gatsby and why? Chain of events LT08- author’s purpose LT09- Is Gatsby’s decision to obsess about Daisy all his life a good idea? LT10- What conclusion can a reader draw about Daisy and Tom?