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DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY I
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  1. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY I CREATIVE CONTROLS : SHUTTER SPEED & MOTION

  2. SHUTTER SPEED & MOTION SHUTTER SPEED : the facts SHUTTER SPEED: creative control FORM & CONTENT

  3. Shutter Speed in a digital camera refers to the length of time that light is permitted to enter the camera and strike the sensor. Your shutter speed is one of two controls your camera has over the amount of light that reaches the sensor. _________________________________  shutter speed settings are recorded in seconds or fractions of a second : 1/500, 1/250, 1/125, 1/60, 1/30, 1/15, 1/8 etc  shutter speeds available to you on your camera will double (approximately) the amount of light coming into the camera with each setting (example: 1/250 lets in twice as much light as 1/500)  the bigger the dominator the faster the speed (example: 1/1000 is much faster than 1/30)

  4. In addition to controlling exposure, the shutter speed is the most important control you have over how motion is captured in a photograph. faster shutter speed = shorter duration of exposure = less light reaches the sensor = FREEZING MOTION

  5. In addition to controlling exposure, the shutter speed is the most important control you have over how motion is captured in a photograph. slow shutter speed = longer duration of exposure = more light reaches the sensor = THE MORE A MOVING SUBJECT WILL BE BLURRED

  6. slow shutter speed fast shutter speed

  7. SHUTTER SPEED & MOTION SHUTTER SPEED : the facts SHUTTER SPEED : creative control FORM & CONTENT

  8. Motion that goes horizontally across the camera’s frame blurs more quickly than motion that is coming towards or away from the camera. SLOW SHUTTER SPEEDS

  9. Zooming a lens during a slow shutter speed and create strange effects. SLOW SHUTTER SPEEDS Patricia Ridenour

  10. Moving the body of you camera during long exposures can create strange effects. SLOW SHUTTER SPEEDS

  11. With slower shutter speeds you can……. SLOW SHUTTER SPEEDS LIGHT PAINT Using any handheld light source: sparklers, cell phones, flashlights, Christmas lights, laser lights, or glow sticks.

  12. With slower shutter speeds you can……. SLOW SHUTTER SPEEDS CREATE STARRING When you are photographing a radiant light source (such as a street lamp) you can create a starring effect. This starring effect changes when you use different lens.

  13. With slower shutter speeds you can……. SLOW SHUTTER SPEEDS PANNING During the exposure, the photographer moved the camera in the same direction that the diver was moving, hence the streaky background and the in focus diver.

  14. With slower shutter speeds you can……. SLOW SHUTTER SPEEDS MAKE GHOST FIGURES During the exposure a figure walked in front of the camera, creating the effect of a “ghost’ figure.

  15. FASTSHUTTER SPEEDS 1/8000: The fastest speed available in full frame DSLR cameras and is used to take sharp photographs of very fast subjects under good lighting conditions.

  16. FORM = CONTENT refers to the work’s physical characteristics and how the elements of design are implemented refers to the work’s essence- what the artist is trying to communicate to the viewer

  17. FORM = CONTENTMotion creates meaning.Motion accentuates meaning.

  18. Hiroshi Sugimoto, Canton Palace, Ohio, 1980

  19. Hiroshi Sugimoto, Paramount Theatre, Los Angeles, 1997

  20. Hiroshi Sugimoto, Civic Theatre, New Zealand, 1991

  21. Hiroshi Sugimoto, Radio City Music Hall, 1978

  22. Hiroshi Sugimoto, Tri City Drive-In, 1993

  23. Harold Edgerton, Shooting the Apple, 1964

  24. Harold Edgerton, Milk Drop Coronet, 1957

  25. Harold Edgerton, Bullet Through Balloons, 1959

  26. Harold Edgerton, Cutting the Card, 1964, 1/1,000,000 exposure

  27. Duane Michals, The Young Girl’s Dream, 1969,

  28. Duane Michals, The Anunciation, 1980

  29. Duane Michals, What are Dreams?

  30. Duane Michals

  31. Bruce Nauman, Self Portrait as a Fountain, 1966-67, from Eleven Color Photographs

  32. Bruce Nauman, Eating My Words, 1967, from Eleven Color Photographs

  33. Bruce Nauman, Waxing Hot, 1967, from Eleven Color Photographs

  34. Bruce Nauman, Eleven Color Photographs, 1966-67/70

  35. Roni Horn, Cabinet of 2001, 36 C-prints

  36. Roni Horn, Cabinet of 2001, 36 C-prints

  37. Roni Horn, Cabinet of 2001

  38. Roni Horn, Puff (1), 2002

  39. RoniHornYou are the Weather, 1994-1995

  40. Roni Horn, You are the Weather, 1994-1995

  41. RoniHorn,Youare the Weather, 1994-1995

  42. Philippe Halsman, Jumpology, Audrey Hepburn, 1955

  43. Philippe Halsman, Jumpology, Duke and Duchess of Windsor, 1956

  44. Philippe Halsman, Jumpology, Jean Seberg with Cat, 1959

  45. Philippe Halsman in collaboration with Salvador Dali, Dali Atomicus, 1948 approximately 1/500th of a second

  46. HIROSHI SUGIMOTO “The question-and-answer session that led up to this vision went something like this: Suppose you shoot a whole movie in a single frame? And the answer: You get a shining screen. Immediately Isprang into action, experimenting toward realizing this vision. Dressed up as a tourist, I walked into a cheap cinema in the East Village with a large-format camera. As soon asthe movie started, I fixed the shutter at a wide-open aperture, and two hours later when the movie finished, I clicked the shutter closed. That evening, I developed the film, and the vision exploded behind my eyes. “

  47. Nicole.Tschampel@sunywcc.edu DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY I ART 129 Westchester Community College :: Center for the Arts